1983 Australian Touring Car Championship

19831983 ATCCATCC1983 Australian Touring Car Champion
The 1983 Australian Touring Car Championship was a CAMS sanctioned motor racing title for drivers of Group C Touring Cars.wikipedia
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Allan Moffat Racing

Allan Moffat EnterprisesPeter Stuyvesant International RacingMoffat Ford Dealers
His race almost ended coming out of the Karrasell on the first lap when the left rear tyre of his Commodore got out into the mud and pitched the car sideways, almost into the path of Gregg Hansford in the second Allan Moffat Racing Mazda RX-7.
The team was highly successful, winning races on three continents including three Australian Touring Car Championships in 1976, 1977 and 1983, four Bathurst 500/1000s including a memorable 1-2 victory in 1977, and the 1987 Monza 500, which was the inaugural race of the World Touring Car Championship.

George Fury

Moffat himself dominated the racing, taking four out of the eight race wins, but a beneficial points structure for smaller capacity cars allowed George Fury (driving a turbocharged version of the Nissan Bluebird) to push Moffat all the way to the title, despite not actually winning a race.
With the benefit of running in the "Up to and including 3000cc" class which gave bonus points for outright placings, Fury narrowly lost the 1983 Australian Touring Car Championship by six points to Allan Moffat after the Nissan team decided not to attend the final round of the series.

Allan Moffat

AllanAllan George MoffatAllan Moffat Enterprises
The championship was won by Allan Moffat, his fourth and final Australian Touring Car Championship and a first for Mazda, who were helping to fund Moffat's team and it was also the first ATCC win for a Japanese manufacturer.
Moffat drove the RX-7 to four consecutive top-six finishes at Bathurst between 1981 and 1984 including a second in 1983 and 3rd in 1984, while winning his fourth and final ATCC title in 1983.

Gregg Hansford

His race almost ended coming out of the Karrasell on the first lap when the left rear tyre of his Commodore got out into the mud and pitched the car sideways, almost into the path of Gregg Hansford in the second Allan Moffat Racing Mazda RX-7.
Hansford then put in some good performances in the Mazda in the 1983 Australian Touring Car Championship.

Holden Commodore (VH)

Holden VH Commodore SSHolden VH CommodoreVH Commodore
Peter Brock in his Marlboro Holden Dealer Team VH Commodore SS finished third in the championship.
The Commodore was still a major force in the 1983 Australian Touring Car Championship with both Grice and Brock each winning two of the eight round series.

Lakeside International Raceway

LakesideLAKLakeside Raceway
The title, which was the 24th Australian Touring Car Championship, was contested over a series which began on 6 February 1983 at Calder Park Raceway and ended on 19 June at Lakeside International Raceway after eight rounds. Brock's win in the final round at Lakeside was easily one of the drives of the series.

Calder Park Raceway

CalderCalder ParkCalder Park Thunderdome
The title, which was the 24th Australian Touring Car Championship, was contested over a series which began on 6 February 1983 at Calder Park Raceway and ended on 19 June at Lakeside International Raceway after eight rounds.

Allan Grice

Allan Maxwell Grice
Moffat, Brock and Allan Grice (who won rounds 2 and 3 at Sandown and Symmons Plains in his new Roadways Racing Commodore before fading later in the series) were the only race winners in the 1983 ATCC.

Oran Park Raceway

Oran ParkORAAUS
Controversially CAMS announced the concessions for the post-ATCC 1 August homologation during the race of Round 7 at Oran Park via the ABC's telecast of the race, with ABC commentators Will Hagon and John Smailes making the announcement mid-race.

Mike Burgmann

After driving mostly in the Amaroo Park based "AMSCAR Series" in 1983, as well as appearing in the Sydney rounds of the ATCC and Australian Endurance Championship, Burgmann made his first Bathurst start in 1983 driving an ex-Kevin Bartlett Chevrolet Camaro with fellow Bathurst rookie (and future dual Great Race winner) Tony Longhurst.

Dick Johnson (racing driver)

Dick JohnsonDickRichard Francis Johnson
Brock recovered still in 3rd place and soon past an ailing Dick Johnson whose Falcon had suffered a power steering pump failure on the grid which would cause his early retirement as he could not steer the car properly.

Lakeside ATCC round

LakesideroundThe Governor's Trophy
Brock's win in the final round at Lakeside was easily one of the drives of the series.

Datsun Bluebird (910)

Nissan Bluebird TurboBluebird TurboNissan Bluebird
Moffat himself dominated the racing, taking four out of the eight race wins, but a beneficial points structure for smaller capacity cars allowed George Fury (driving a turbocharged version of the Nissan Bluebird) to push Moffat all the way to the title, despite not actually winning a race.
Fury had driven the Bluebird to second place in the 1983 Australian Touring Car Championship, and later that year became the first driver to put a turbocharged car on the front row at Bathurst when he qualified second for the 1983 James Hardie 1000.

Roadways Racing

RoadwaysICL RacingSTP Roadways Racing
Moffat, Brock and Allan Grice (who won rounds 2 and 3 at Sandown and Symmons Plains in his new Roadways Racing Commodore before fading later in the series) were the only race winners in the 1983 ATCC.
Grice put in some solid performances in the 1987 Australian Touring Car Championship, his first full championship run since 1983, but could only finish in 8th place.

Peter Brock

PeterAustralian racerenergy polariser
Peter Brock in his Marlboro Holden Dealer Team VH Commodore SS finished third in the championship.

1983 James Hardie 1000

1983James Hardie 1000Report
The fallout from CAMS decision led to both the Nissan and Roadways teams boycotting the final race of the series at Lakeside, though the official reason given by Nissan team manager Howard Marsden was that the Bluebird's needed further development for the upcoming 1983 Australian Endurance Championship which included both blue ribbon events, the Sandown 400 and the James Hardie 1000 at Bathurst.

1983 Castrol 400

1983Castrol 400Report
The fallout from CAMS decision led to both the Nissan and Roadways teams boycotting the final race of the series at Lakeside, though the official reason given by Nissan team manager Howard Marsden was that the Bluebird's needed further development for the upcoming 1983 Australian Endurance Championship which included both blue ribbon events, the Sandown 400 and the James Hardie 1000 at Bathurst.
After a poor ATCC in which he lost his crown to Moffat, Dick Johnson served notice that the Ford XE Falcon would be a force at Bathurst after development work had cured the big Ford's suspension problems.

DJR Team Penske

Dick Johnson RacingPalmer Tube MillsJim Beam Racing
The 1983 Australian Touring Car Championship was a disappointment as the heavy (approximately 1400 kg) XE Falcon was not competitive against the lighter (by around 200 kg) Commodores, the Nissan Bluebird turbo or Allan Moffat's Mazda RX-7 which won the title.

1983 Australian Endurance Championship

1983Australian Endurance Championship1983 Australian Endurance Champion
The fallout from CAMS decision led to both the Nissan and Roadways teams boycotting the final race of the series at Lakeside, though the official reason given by Nissan team manager Howard Marsden was that the Bluebird's needed further development for the upcoming 1983 Australian Endurance Championship which included both blue ribbon events, the Sandown 400 and the James Hardie 1000 at Bathurst.
The other winners were 1983 ATCC winner Allan Moffat who drove his Mazda RX-7 to victory in the Castrol 400, and Allan Grice who drove his Roadways Commodore to victory at Surfers Paradise.

Gibson Motorsport

Gibson Motor SportPeter Jackson Nissan RacingNissan Motorsport Australia
Whilst Nissan driver George Fury, helped by consistent performances, led the series (uncorrected points) going into the final round at Lakeside, Fury was essentially 5 points behind Moffat in the points system corrected for the top 7 races, therefore Fury needed to finish ahead of Moffat or Moffat finish in 6th place or worse to claim the title.
The 1.8 litre Bluebird turbo was fast but fragile, although George Fury did finish second in the 1983 Australian Touring Car Championship (without taking a round win) and took pole position in the 1984 James Hardie 1000 at Bathurst with a lap time that would stand as a record until 1990.

David Parsons (racing driver)

David ParsonsDavid 'Skippy' Parsons
This, and his performances in his self-funded Commodore in the 1983 ATCC, brought him to the attention of Peter Brock and the Holden Dealer Team, and with the help of Janson he was drafted into the HDT for the 1984 Australian Endurance Championship.

Kevin Bartlett (racing driver)

Kevin Bartlett
Kevin Bartlett's final race in the Camaro came in the Oran Park round of the 1983 ATCC, though by this time he was not competitive and he only recorded a 9th-place finish.

Mazda RX-7

RX-7Mazda RX7Mazda RX-7 FD3S
The "3001-6000cc class" consisted of Chevrolet Camaro, Ford Falcon, Holden Commodore and Mazda RX-7.
Over a four-year span beginning in 1981, Moffat took the Mazda RX-7 to victory in the 1983 Australian Touring Car Championship, as well as a trio of Bathurst 1000 podiums, in 1981 (3rd with Derek Bell), 1983 (second with Yoshimi Katayama) and 1984 (third with former motorcycle champion Gregg Hansford).