1983 United Kingdom general election

1983 general election19831983 election1983 UK general electiongeneral electiongeneral election of 19839 June 19831983 Conservative landslidenext general electionUK general election
The 1983 United Kingdom general election was held on Thursday, 9 June 1983.wikipedia
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Margaret Thatcher

ThatcherBaroness ThatcherThatcherite
It gave the Conservative Party under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of the Labour Party in 1945.
Thatcher's popularity in her first years in office waned amid recession and rising unemployment, until victory in the 1982 Falklands War and the recovering economy brought a resurgence of support, resulting in her decisive re-election in 1983.

Falklands War

Falklands ConflictOperation CorporateFalklands
However, the British victory in the Falklands War led to a recovery of her personal popularity; the economy had also returned to growth.
In the United Kingdom, the Conservative government, bolstered by the successful outcome, was re-elected with an increased majority the following year.

Tony Blair

BlairTonyPrime Minister Tony Blair
Three future leaders of the Labour Party (Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and Jeremy Corbyn) were first elected at this election – two went on hold the office of Prime Minister, whilst Corbyn became Labour leader in 2015.
Blair became involved in Labour politics and, in 1983, he was elected member of Parliament for Sedgefield.

Michael Foot

The Right Honourable '''Michael FootFootFoot, Michael
The Labour Party had been led by Michael Foot since the resignation of former Prime Minister James Callaghan in 1980.
Foot led Labour into the 1983 general election, when the party obtained its lowest share of the vote since the 1918 general election and the fewest parliamentary seats it had had at any time since before 1945.

Jeremy Corbyn

CorbynFionn McGorryCorbynist
Three future leaders of the Labour Party (Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and Jeremy Corbyn) were first elected at this election – two went on hold the office of Prime Minister, whilst Corbyn became Labour leader in 2015.
Corbyn has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for Islington North since 1983.

Liberal Party (UK)

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
Several moderate Labour MPs had defected from the party to form the Social Democratic Party (SDP); they then formed the SDP–Liberal Alliance with the existing Liberal Party.
At the 1983 general election, the Alliance won over a quarter of the vote, but only 23 of the 650 seats it contested.

Gordon Brown

BrownJames Gordon BrownMr. Brown
Three future leaders of the Labour Party (Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and Jeremy Corbyn) were first elected at this election – two went on hold the office of Prime Minister, whilst Corbyn became Labour leader in 2015.
Brown was a member of Parliament (MP) from 1983 to 2015, first for Dunfermline East and later for Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath.

SDP–Liberal Alliance

SDP-Liberal AllianceAllianceLiberal-SDP Alliance
Several moderate Labour MPs had defected from the party to form the Social Democratic Party (SDP); they then formed the SDP–Liberal Alliance with the existing Liberal Party.
Formed by the Social Democratic Party (SDP) and the Liberal Party, the Alliance was established in 1981, contesting the 1983 general election, 1984 European election and 1987 general election.

Social Democratic Party (UK)

Social Democratic PartySDPSocial Democrat
Several moderate Labour MPs had defected from the party to form the Social Democratic Party (SDP); they then formed the SDP–Liberal Alliance with the existing Liberal Party. In 1981 a group of senior figures including Roy Jenkins, David Owen, Bill Rodgers and Shirley Williams left Labour to found the Social Democratic Party (SDP).
For the 1983 and 1987 General Elections, the SDP formed a political and electoral alliance with the Liberal Party, the SDP–Liberal Alliance.

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
It gave the Conservative Party under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of the Labour Party in 1945.
Thatcher led the Conservatives to two further electoral victories with landslide majorities in 1983 and 1987.

Charles Kennedy

Charles Kennedy MPCharlie KennedyKennedy
In addition, two future Leaders of the Liberal Democrats were first elected (Paddy Ashdown and Charles Kennedy), and one of the Conservative Party (Michael Howard).
Charles Peter Kennedy (25 November 1959 – 1 June 2015) was a British Liberal Democrat politician who was Leader of the Liberal Democrats from 1999 to 2006, and a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1983 to 2015, latterly for the Ross, Skye and Lochaber constituency.

Roy Jenkins

The Lord Jenkins of HillheadJenkins, RoyRoy Jenkins, Baron Jenkins of Hillhead
In 1981 a group of senior figures including Roy Jenkins, David Owen, Bill Rodgers and Shirley Williams left Labour to found the Social Democratic Party (SDP).
He was formally made Leader of the SDP ahead of the 1983 general election, during the SDP-Liberal Alliance.

Michael Howard

Michael Howard, Baron Howard of LympneThe Lord Howard of LympneLord Howard of Lympne
In addition, two future Leaders of the Liberal Democrats were first elected (Paddy Ashdown and Charles Kennedy), and one of the Conservative Party (Michael Howard).
He first became a Member of Parliament at the 1983 general election, representing the constituency of Folkestone and Hythe.

List of MPs elected in the 1983 United Kingdom general election

49th49th Parliament1983 MPs
* List of MPs elected in the 1983 United Kingdom general election
This is a list of Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the 49th Parliament of the United Kingdom in the 1983 general election, held on 9 June 1983.

Early 1980s recession

recessionrecession of the early 1980seconomic recession
Unemployment increased during the first three years of her premiership and the economy went through a recession.
However, an economic recovery, combined with the Falklands War, led to the Thatcher-led Conservative Party winning 42.4% of votes for a parliamentary majority in the general election in 1983.

Liberal Democrats (UK)

Liberal DemocratsLiberal DemocratLib Dem
Changing the electoral system had been a long-running Liberal Party campaign plank and would later be adopted by the Liberal Democrats.
At the 1983 general election, the Liberals gained five additional seats although the SDP lost many that they had previously inherited from Labour.

The longest suicide note in history

Labour's 1983 manifestoleft-wing election manifestoThe New Hope for Britain
Labour's campaign manifesto involved leaving the European Economic Community, abolishing the House of Lords, abandoning the United Kingdom's nuclear deterrent by cancelling Trident and removing cruise missiles—a programme dubbed by Labour MP Gerald Kaufman "the longest suicide note in history"; "Although, at barely 37 pages, it only seemed interminable", noted Roy Hattersley.
"The longest suicide note in history" is an epithet originally used by United Kingdom Labour MP Gerald Kaufman to describe his party's 1983 general election manifesto, which emphasised socialist policies in a more profound manner than previous such documents—and which Kaufman felt would ensure that the Labour Party (then in opposition) would fail to win the election.

Tony Benn

Anthony Wedgwood BennBenniteAnthony Wedgewood Benn
Former Labour Prime Minister Harold Wilson, Shirley Williams, Bill Rodgers, Joan Lestor and Tony Benn left Parliament as a result of this election, although Benn would return in a by-election the following year, and Lestor at the following general election. The most significant Labour loss of the night was Tony Benn, who was defeated in the revived Bristol East seat.
His second son Hilary was a councillor in London, stood for Parliament in 1983 and 1987, and becoming Labour MP for Leeds Central in 1999.

Labour Party (UK)

Labour PartyLabourBritish Labour Party
It gave the Conservative Party under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of the Labour Party in 1945.
The Labour Party was defeated heavily in the 1983 general election, winning only 27.6% of the vote, its lowest share since 1918, and receiving only half a million votes more than the SDP-Liberal Alliance who leader Michael Foot condemned for "siphoning" Labour support and enabling the Conservatives to greatly increase their majority of parliamentary seats.

Landslide victory

landslidelandslide electionlandslide victories
The election saw a landslide victory for the Conservatives, achieving their best results since 1935.

Peter Sissons

It was also broadcast on ITV, and presented by Alastair Burnet, Peter Sissons and Martyn Lewis.
He also co-presented ITN's 1983 General Election Night programmes (with Sir Alastair Burnet and Martyn Lewis) and in 1987 (with Burnet and Alastair Stewart).

Gerald Kaufman

Sir Gerald KaufmanGerald Bernard KaufmanGerald Kaufman MP
Labour's campaign manifesto involved leaving the European Economic Community, abolishing the House of Lords, abandoning the United Kingdom's nuclear deterrent by cancelling Trident and removing cruise missiles—a programme dubbed by Labour MP Gerald Kaufman "the longest suicide note in history"; "Although, at barely 37 pages, it only seemed interminable", noted Roy Hattersley.
Kaufman was elected MP for Manchester Ardwick at the 1970 general election; he switched constituency to Manchester Gorton at the 1983 election, following the major changes in parliamentary boundaries in that year.

Bristol East (UK Parliament constituency)

Bristol EastBristol, EastBristol East BC
The most significant Labour loss of the night was Tony Benn, who was defeated in the revived Bristol East seat.
The 1983 election, the first in the recreated East seat, was a landslide victory for Margaret Thatcher's Conservatives following retention of the Falkland Islands in the Falklands War.

2017 United Kingdom general election in Scotland

2017 general election20172017 United Kingdom election
The Scottish Conservatives have been unable to match their 1983 Westminster seat total since, although they did record a slightly larger share of the Scottish vote in 2017.
The Conservatives recorded their best result in Scotland since 1983 (in terms of seats won) or 1979 (in terms of share of the popular vote).