1988 Summer Olympics

19881988 Seoul Olympics1988 Olympics1988 Olympic Games1988 SeoulSeoul 19881988 Summer Olympic GamesSeoulSeoul OlympicsSummer Olympics
The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad (Korean: ; ), was an international multi-sport event celebrated from 17 September to 2 October 1988 in Seoul, South Korea.wikipedia
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Nagoya bid for the 1988 Summer Olympics

Nagoya1988 Summer Olympics bidlosing
Nagoya 1988 was one of the two short-listed bids for the 1988 Summer Olympic Games, and was to be held in Nagoya, Japan.

Seoul

Seoul, South KoreaHanseongHanyang
The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad (Korean: ; ), was an international multi-sport event celebrated from 17 September to 2 October 1988 in Seoul, South Korea.
Seoul has hosted the 1986 Asian Games, 1988 Summer Olympics, 2002 FIFA World Cup, and more recently the 2010 G-20 Seoul summit.

Athletics at the 1988 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

men's 100 metres100 m1988
Canadian Ben Johnson won the 100 m final with a new world record, but was disqualified after he tested positive for stanozolol. Johnson has since claimed that his positive test was the result of sabotage.
The Men's 100 Meters at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea – ended in controversy after Canada's Ben Johnson defeated defending champion Carl Lewis of the United States in a world record time of 9.79s, breaking his own record of 9.83s that he had set at the 1987 World Championship in Rome.

Gymnastics at the 1988 Summer Olympics – Women's artistic team all-around

team final19881988 Olympic Games
In the Women's Artistic Gymnastics Team All-Around Competition, the U.S. women's team was penalized with a deduction of five tenths of a point from their team score by the Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique (FIG) after the compulsory round due to their Olympic team alternate Rhonda Faehn appearing on the podium for the uneven bars during the duration of Kelly Garrison-Steve's compulsory uneven bars routine, despite not competing, having been caught by the East German judge, Ellen Berger. The U.S. finished fourth after the completion of the optional rounds with a combined score of 390.575, three tenths of a point behind East Germany. This still remains controversial in the sport of gymnastics, as the U.S. performed better than the East German team and they would have taken the bronze medal in the team competition had they not been penalized or had an inquiry accepted to receive the points back.
These are the results of the women's team all-around competition, one of six events for female competitors in artistic gymnastics at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul.

1986 Asian Games

X19861986 Seoul
After the Olympics were awarded, Seoul also received the opportunity to stage the 10th Asian Games in 1986, using them to test its preparation for the Olympics.
The venues and facilities of the 10th Asiad were the same venues and facilities that would be used in the 1988 Summer Olympics, this was considered a test event.

Ben Johnson (sprinter)

Ben JohnsonDubin Inquiry Ben Johnson
Canadian Ben Johnson won the 100 m final with a new world record, but was disqualified after he tested positive for stanozolol. Johnson has since claimed that his positive test was the result of sabotage.
He set consecutive 100 metres world records at the 1987 World Championships in Athletics and the 1988 Summer Olympics, but he was disqualified for doping, losing the Olympic title and both records.

Greg Louganis

U.S. diver Greg Louganis won back-to-back titles on both diving events despite hitting his head on the springboard in the third round and suffering a concussion.
Gregory Efthimios "Greg" Louganis (born January 29, 1960) is an American Olympic diver, LGBT activist, and author who won gold medals at the 1984 and 1988 Summer Olympics, on both the springboard and platform.

Kelly Garrison

Kelly Garrison-StevesKelly Garrison-Steve
In the Women's Artistic Gymnastics Team All-Around Competition, the U.S. women's team was penalized with a deduction of five tenths of a point from their team score by the Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique (FIG) after the compulsory round due to their Olympic team alternate Rhonda Faehn appearing on the podium for the uneven bars during the duration of Kelly Garrison-Steve's compulsory uneven bars routine, despite not competing, having been caught by the East German judge, Ellen Berger. The U.S. finished fourth after the completion of the optional rounds with a combined score of 390.575, three tenths of a point behind East Germany. This still remains controversial in the sport of gymnastics, as the U.S. performed better than the East German team and they would have taken the bronze medal in the team competition had they not been penalized or had an inquiry accepted to receive the points back.
An elite gymnast for eight years, she represented the United States at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea.

Florence Griffith Joyner

Florence GriffithFlorence Griffith-JoynerFlorence "Flo Jo" Griffith-Joyner
After having demolished the world record in the 100 m dash at the Olympic Trials in Indianapolis, U.S. sprinter Florence Griffith Joyner set an Olympic record (10.62) in the 100-metre dash and a still-standing world record (21.34) in the 200-metre dash to capture gold medals in both events. To these medals, she added a gold in the 4×100 relay and a silver in the 4×400.
At the 1988 U.S. Olympic trials, Griffith set a new world record in the 100 m. She went on to win three gold medals at the 1988 Olympics.

Janet Evans

Evans
Swimmer Kristin Otto of East Germany won six gold medals. Other multi-medalists in the pool were Matt Biondi (five) and Janet Evans (three).
Evans was a world champion and world record-holder, and won a total of four gold medals at the 1988 and the 1992 Olympics.

Matt Biondi

Swimmer Kristin Otto of East Germany won six gold medals. Other multi-medalists in the pool were Matt Biondi (five) and Janet Evans (three). Anthony Nesty of Suriname won his country's first Olympic medal by winning the 100 m butterfly, scoring an upset victory over Matt Biondi by .01 of a second (thwarting Biondi's attempt of breaking Mark Spitz' record seven golds in one Olympic event); he was the first black person to win an individual swimming gold.
Biondi competed in the Summer Olympic Games in 1984, 1988 and 1992, winning a total of eleven medals (eight gold, two silver and one bronze).

Roy Jones Jr.

Roy JonesRoy Jones, Jr.Roy Jones Jr
In boxing, Roy Jones Jr. of the U.S. dominated his opponents, never losing a single round en route to the final. In the final, he controversially lost a 3–2 decision to South Korean fighter Park Si-Hun despite pummeling Park for three rounds and landing 86 punches to Park's 32.
As an amateur he represented the United States at the 1988 Summer Olympics, winning a silver medal in the light middleweight division in a highly controversial decision.

Perfect 10 (gymnastics)

perfect 10perfect 10sperfect score
Soviet Vladimir Artemov won four gold medals in gymnastics. Daniela Silivaş of Romania won three and equalled compatriot Nadia Comăneci's record of seven Perfect 10s in one Olympic Games.
Other women who accomplished this feat at the Olympics include Nellie Kim, also in 1976, Mary Lou Retton in 1984, and Daniela Silivaș and Yelena Shushunova in 1988.

Kristin Otto

Otto
Swimmer Kristin Otto of East Germany won six gold medals. Other multi-medalists in the pool were Matt Biondi (five) and Janet Evans (three).
She is most famous for being the first woman to win six gold medals at a single Olympic Games, doing so at the 1988 Seoul Olympic games.

Lennox Lewis

Lewis
In yet another boxing controversy, Riddick Bowe of the US lost a controversial match in the finals to future world heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis. Bowe had a dominant first round, landing 33 of 94 punches thrown (34%) while Lewis landed 14 of 67 (21%). In the first round the referee from East Germany gave Bowe two cautions for headbutts and deducted a point for a third headbutt, although replay clearly showed there was no headbutt. Commentator Ferdie Pacheco disagreed with the deduction, saying they did not hit heads. In the second round, Lewis landed several hard punches. The referee gave Bowe two standing eight counts and waved the fight off after the second one, even though Bowe seemed able to continue. Pacheco disagreed with the stoppage, calling it "very strange."
Holding dual British and Canadian citizenship, Lewis represented Canada as an amateur at the 1988 Summer Olympics, winning a gold medal in the super-heavyweight division after defeating future world champion Riddick Bowe in the final.

Riddick Bowe

Bowe
In yet another boxing controversy, Riddick Bowe of the US lost a controversial match in the finals to future world heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis. Bowe had a dominant first round, landing 33 of 94 punches thrown (34%) while Lewis landed 14 of 67 (21%). In the first round the referee from East Germany gave Bowe two cautions for headbutts and deducted a point for a third headbutt, although replay clearly showed there was no headbutt. Commentator Ferdie Pacheco disagreed with the deduction, saying they did not hit heads. In the second round, Lewis landed several hard punches. The referee gave Bowe two standing eight counts and waved the fight off after the second one, even though Bowe seemed able to continue. Pacheco disagreed with the stoppage, calling it "very strange."
He reigned as the undisputed heavyweight champion in 1992, and as an amateur he won a silver medal in the super heavyweight division at the 1988 Summer Olympics.

South Korea

🇰🇷KoreaKOR
The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad (Korean: ; ), was an international multi-sport event celebrated from 17 September to 2 October 1988 in Seoul, South Korea.
Seoul hosted the Olympic Games in 1988, widely regarded as successful and a significant boost for South Korea's global image and economy.

Seoul Olympic Stadium

Olympic StadiumJamsil Olympic StadiumSeoul
Seoul Olympic Stadium – opening/closing ceremonies, athletics, equestrian (jumping individual final), football (final)
It is the main stadium built for the 1988 Summer Olympics and the 10th Asian Games in 1986.

Gabriela Sabatini

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Tennis returned to the Olympics after a 64-year absence, and Steffi Graf added to her four Grand Slam victories in the year by also winning the Olympic title, beating Sabatini in the final.
Sabatini was selected to represent Argentina in the 1988 Summer Olympics held in Seoul and carried her country's flag in the opening ceremony.

Melvin Stewart

Mel StewartMelvin "Mel" Stewart
Swimmer Mel Stewart of the U.S. was the most anticipated to win the men's 200 m butterfly final but surprisingly, came in 5th.
At the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, Stewart placed fifth in the men's 200-meter butterfly with a time of 1:59.19.

Athletics at the 1988 Summer Olympics

Olympic GamesAthletics1988 Summer Olympics
At the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul a total number of 42 events in athletics were contested: 24 by men and 18 by women.

Archery at the 1988 Summer Olympics – Women's individual

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The women's individual was one of two events for women out of four total events on the archery programme at the 1988 Summer Olympics.

Miracle on the Han River

economic developmentboost in the South Korean economyeconomy has prospered
After President Park's assassination in 1979, Chun Doo-hwan, his successor, submitted Korea's bid to the IOC in September 1981, in hopes that the increased international exposure brought by the Olympics would legitimize his authoritarian regime amidst increasing political pressure for democratization, provide protection from increasing threats from North Korea, and showcase the Korean economic miracle to the world community.
The rapid reconstruction and development of the South Korean economy during the latter half of the 20th century was accompanied by events such as the country's successful hosting of the 1988 Summer Olympics and its co-hosting of the 2002 FIFA World Cup, as well as the ascension of family-owned conglomerates known as chaebols, such as Samsung, LG, and Hyundai.