1988 Winter Olympics

19881988 Calgary1988 Winter Olympic Games1988 OlympicsWinter OlympicsCalgary 19881988 Calgary OlympicsCalgaryCalgary OlympicsXV Olympic Winter Games
The 1988 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XV Olympic Winter Games (Les XVes Jeux olympiques d'hiver), was a Winter Olympics multi-sport event celebrated in and around Calgary, Alberta, Canada, between February 13 and 28, 1988 and were the first Winter Olympics to be held over a whole two week period.wikipedia
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Calgary

Calgary, AlbertaCalgary, ABCalgary, Alberta, Canada
The 1988 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XV Olympic Winter Games (Les XVes Jeux olympiques d'hiver), was a Winter Olympics multi-sport event celebrated in and around Calgary, Alberta, Canada, between February 13 and 28, 1988 and were the first Winter Olympics to be held over a whole two week period.
In 1988, Calgary became the first Canadian city to host the Winter Olympic Games.

Winter Olympic Games

Winter OlympicsOlympicsOlympic
The 1988 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XV Olympic Winter Games (Les XVes Jeux olympiques d'hiver), was a Winter Olympics multi-sport event celebrated in and around Calgary, Alberta, Canada, between February 13 and 28, 1988 and were the first Winter Olympics to be held over a whole two week period.
The Games have been held four times in the United States (in 1932, 1960, 1980 and 2002); three times in France (in 1924, 1968 and 1992); and twice each in Austria (1964, 1976), Canada (1988, 2010), Japan (1972, 1998), Italy (1956, 2006), Norway (1952, 1994), and Switzerland (1928, 1948).

Matti Nykänen

Matti "The Flying Finn" Nykänen
Finnish ski jumper Matti Nykänen and Dutch speed skater Yvonne van Gennip were individual medal leaders with each winning three gold medals.
Most notably, he won three gold medals at the 1988 Winter Olympics, becoming, along with Yvonne van Gennip of the Netherlands, the most successful athlete at that event.

Yvonne van Gennip

Finnish ski jumper Matti Nykänen and Dutch speed skater Yvonne van Gennip were individual medal leaders with each winning three gold medals.
Her main success dates from the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary, where she unexpectedly won three gold medals.

Jamaica national bobsleigh team

Jamaican bobsled team1988 Jamaican Bobsleigh Teambobsleigh team
The games are also remembered for the "heroic failure" of British ski jumper Eddie "The Eagle" Edwards, and the Winter Olympic début of the Jamaica national bobsled team, both of which would be subjects of major feature films about their participation in the games.
The team first gained fame during their debut in the 1988 Winter Olympic Games four-man bobsled in Calgary, Alberta, where they were seen as underdogs as they represented a tropical nation in a winter sport.

Canmore, Alberta

CanmoreCalgaryCanmore Nordic Centre
Most events took place in Calgary while several skiing events were held in the mountain resorts of Nakiska and Canmore, west of the city.
Canmore's economic future seemed dismal until the announcement in the early 1980s that Calgary would be hosting the 1988 Winter Olympics, and that Canmore would play host to the Nordic events.

Canadian Winter Sport Institute

WinSport CanadaCalgary Olympic Development AssociationWinSport
Previous bids representing Montreal (1956) and Vancouver (1976 and 1980) bookended failed attempts by the Calgary Olympic Development Association (CODA) to host the 1964, 1968 and 1972 games.
The Canadian Winter Sport Institute, also known as WinSport Canada is a non-profit organization based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada whose mandate is to provide training y development to Canada's Olympic athletes, and to maintain the facilities built for the 1988 Winter Olympics.

Eddie the Eagle

Eddie EdwardsEddie "The Eagle" EdwardsMichael Edwards
The games are also remembered for the "heroic failure" of British ski jumper Eddie "The Eagle" Edwards, and the Winter Olympic début of the Jamaica national bobsled team, both of which would be subjects of major feature films about their participation in the games.
During the 1988 Winter Olympics, Edwards competed in and finished last in both the 70 m and 90 m events.

1976 Summer Olympics

19761976 Montreal Olympics1976 Montreal
It was the first Winter Olympics awarded to Canada, and the second games overall, following the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal.
Calgary and Vancouver later hosted the Winter Olympic Games in 1988 and 2010, respectively.

Scotiabank Saddledome

Olympic SaddledomePengrowth SaddledomeSaddledome
Driven by the arrival of the National Hockey League's Calgary Flames, the city had already begun constructing an Olympic coliseum (later named the Olympic Saddledome) prior to the IOC vote, an action that demonstrated Calgary's determination to host the games and positively influenced delegates.
Located in Stampede Park in the southeast end of downtown Calgary, the Saddledome was built in 1983 to replace the Stampede Corral as the home of the Calgary Flames of the National Hockey League, and to host ice hockey and figure skating at the 1988 Winter Olympics.

Ralph Klein

Premier Ralph KleinKleinWerner Schmidt
It secured C$270 million in funding from the federal and provincial governments while civic leaders, including Mayor Ralph Klein, crisscrossed the world attempting to woo International Olympic Committee (IOC) delegates.
During his tenure he presided over the 1988 Winter Olympics, the first Canadian city to host the games.

William Pratt (businessman)

Bill Pratt
It was Bill Pratt, the former contractor who took over as Calgary Organizing Committee president in 1983, and who supervised the enormous construction project.
William "Bill" D. Pratt, (8 November 1928 – 27 November 1999), a Canadian businessman who was chair of the Calgary Olympics, co-founder of the Canada Trail, and member of both the Olympic Order and the Order of Canada.

Falun

Falun, Sweden
The host city was selected in 1981 over Falun, Sweden, and Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy.
The city lost out to Calgary, Alberta, Canada, in 1981 for the 1988 Winter Olympics.

Calgary Flames

CalgaryCGYFlames
Driven by the arrival of the National Hockey League's Calgary Flames, the city had already begun constructing an Olympic coliseum (later named the Olympic Saddledome) prior to the IOC vote, an action that demonstrated Calgary's determination to host the games and positively influenced delegates.
Located on the grounds of the Calgary Exhibition and Stampede, the Saddledome was built as a venue for the 1988 Winter Olympics.

University of Calgary

CalgaryMacEwan Hallthe University of Calgary
The Olympic Oval was built on the campus of the University of Calgary.
The University of Calgary played a central role in facilitating and hosting Canada's first winter olympic games, the XV Olympic Winter Games in 1988.

WinSport

CalgaryAlberta Ski JumpMarkin-MacPhail Centre
Canada Olympic Park was built on the western outskirts of Calgary and hosted bobsled, luge, ski jumping and freestyle skiing.
Canada Olympic Park was one of the venues for the 1988 Winter Olympics, being the primary venue for ski jumping, bobsleigh, and luge.

Curling at the Winter Olympics

curlingOlympicOlympic Curling
Three other existing venues served as secondary facilities: The Max Bell Centre hosted the demonstration events of curling and short track speed skating.
Curling was a demonstration sport at the 1932 Games, and then again after a lengthy absence in 1988 and 1992.

Cortina d'Ampezzo

CortinaAmpezzo Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy
The host city was selected in 1981 over Falun, Sweden, and Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy.
The region lost Winter Olympics bids in 1988 (Calgary, Canada) and 1992 (Albertville, France).

Speed skating at the Winter Olympics

Winter OlympicsSpeed skatinglong track speed skating
It was the first fully enclosed 400-metre speed skating venue in the world as it was necessary to protect against the possibility of either bitter cold temperatures or ice-melting chinook winds.
Following the introduction of World Sprint Championships in the early 1970s, the 1000 m for men was added in Innsbruck 1976, while the women's 5000 m, reinstated by the ISU as an official distance in 1981, made its Olympic debut in 1988.

McMahon Stadium

Calgary McMahon Stadium at home
McMahon Stadium, Calgary's primary outdoor facility, was the site of both the opening and closing ceremonies, the first time in 28 years that the same venue hosted both events.
The stadium also was also the location of the 1988 Winter Olympics opening and closing ceremonies, serving as the Olympic Stadium.

Ice hockey at the Olympic Games

OGOlyWinter Olympics
The Father David Bauer Olympic Arena hosted some ice hockey matches, as did the Stampede Corral, which also played host to some figure skating events.
The 1988 Winter Olympics were held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, where the Soviet team captured its seventh and final gold medal.

Olympic Oval

CalgaryCalgary-Olympic OvalOlympic Speedskating Oval
The Olympic Oval was built on the campus of the University of Calgary.
Construction of The Oval began in 1985, nearly four years after Calgary had been designated host of the XV Olympic Winter Games.

List of IOC meetings

IOC SessionIOC meeting1921 Olympic Congress
The vote was held September 30, 1981, at Baden-Baden, West Germany, during the 84th IOC Session and 11th Olympic Congress.

Stampede Corral

Calgary CorralThe Corral
The Father David Bauer Olympic Arena hosted some ice hockey matches, as did the Stampede Corral, which also played host to some figure skating events.
The Stampede Corral has hosted several major events, including the 1972 World Figure Skating Championships, the figure skating and ice hockey events at the 1988 Winter Olympics, as well as rodeo competitions.

Freestyle skiing at the Winter Olympics

Freestyle skiingOLYfreestyle
Canada Olympic Park was built on the western outskirts of Calgary and hosted bobsled, luge, ski jumping and freestyle skiing.
Freestyle skiing was a demonstration sport at the 1988 Winter Olympics, with moguls, aerials, and ballet events.