1996 J.League

The fourth season since the establishment of the J.League.

- 1996 J.League

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Avispa Fukuoka

Japanese professional football club, currently play in the J1 League.

After becoming the champions of 1995 Japan Football League as Fukuoka Blux, and being admitted to the J.League since 1996 season, Avispa Fukuoka has the longest history as a J.League club being uncrowned in any nationwide competitions such as J.League Division 1, Division 2, J.League Cup, or Emperor's Cup.

Tokyo Verdy

Japanese professional football club based in Inagi, Tokyo.

Ruy Ramos

The 1996 J.League season saw Verdy Kawasaki finish 7th place overall, the lowest standing in the league's existence at that point, and would fall further in the 1997 season, finishing 16th and 12th, in the 1st stage and 2nd stage, respectively, and 15th overall out of 17 teams.

Shimizu S-Pulse

Professional Japanese football club.

S-Pulse fans make the hundred mile trip to FC Tokyo, September 2007
Mount Fuji as seen from Nihondaira Stadium
The home end before a game in 2013
Shimizu S-Pulse shirts.
Club mascot Palchan and co performing at the 2007 All Star game.
S-Pulse Dream plaza is on the site of a former Shimizukō Line station.
Shizuoka branch of the S-Pulse Dream House chain

Finally, in 1996 the team got their hands on the trophy and also gained revenge on Verdy, beating them 5–4 on penalties in the final.

Kashima Antlers

The Kashima Antlers (鹿島アントラーズ) are a football club in Kashima, Ibaraki, currently playing in the J1 League, top tier of Japanese professional football leagues.

Leonardo Araújo, played for Kashima from 1994 to 1996
Outside the Kashima Soccer Stadium
Kashima players training at Azadi Stadium
Kashima Antlers celebrate after winning the 2018 AFC Champions League.

Champions (8): 1996, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2016

J1 League

Top level of the Japan Professional Football League (日本プロサッカーリーグ) system.

Also, until 2004 (with the exception of 1996 season), the J1 season was divided into two.

Takayuki Suzuki

Japanese former professional footballer who played as a forward.

The attacking player (No. 10) attempts to kick the ball beyond the opposing team's goalkeeper, between the goalposts, and beneath the crossbar (not shown) to score a goal.

Suzuki played 87 games in the J1 League for Kashima, scoring 17 goals, and helping the team win the J1 Championship in 1996, 1998, 2000 and 2001.

Edílson

Brazilian football pundit and retired footballer who played as a forward.

The attacking player (No. 10) attempts to kick the ball beyond the opposing team's goalkeeper, between the goalposts, and beneath the crossbar (not shown) to score a goal.

In the two seasons in Japan, Edílson finished both as runner-up in Golden Boot ranking, scoring 21 goals in 1996, and 23 in 1997.

Hiroshi Nanami

Japanese former professional football player and manager.

The attacking player (No. 10) attempts to kick the ball beyond the opposing team's goalkeeper, between the goalposts, and beneath the crossbar (not shown) to score a goal.

He was also selected Best Eleven for three years in a row (1996-1998).

J.League

Japan's professional football league including the first division J1 League, second division J2 League and third division J3 League of the Japanese association football league system.

Former logo
This logo was used from 2015 to 2018

Also, until 2004 (with the exception of 1996 season), the J1 season was divided into two.

Leonardo Araújo

Brazilian football manager, executive, and former player.

Leonardo in 2013
Leonardo

J1 League: 1996