1996 Manchester bombing

1996 IRA bombingManchester bombing1996 bombingIRA bombbomb in 1996IRA bombing19961996 bomb1996 Manchester City Centre bombinga powerful truck bomb
The 1996 Manchester bombing was an attack carried out by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) on Saturday 15 June 1996.wikipedia
170 Related Articles

Manchester

Manchester, EnglandManchester, United KingdomCity of Manchester
The IRA detonated a 1500 kg Lorry bomb on Corporation Street in the centre of Manchester, England.
Its fortune declined after the Second World War, owing to deindustrialisation, but the IRA bombing in 1996 led to extensive investment and regeneration.

Manchester city centre

city centreManchestercentral Manchester
The IRA detonated a 1500 kg Lorry bomb on Corporation Street in the centre of Manchester, England.
The 1996 Manchester bombing provided the impetus for the redevelopment of the city centre and an upturn in retail, leisure, offices and urban living.

Corporation Street, Manchester

Corporation Street
The IRA detonated a 1500 kg Lorry bomb on Corporation Street in the centre of Manchester, England.
The street was bombed in 1996 by the Provisional IRA, since then the vicinity has undergone large scale reconstruction.

2002 Commonwealth Games

Commonwealth Games20022002 Manchester
The year before, Manchester had also won its bid to host the 2002 Commonwealth Games, at the time the biggest multi-sport event ever to be staged in Britain. A Thanksgiving service for the "Miracle of Manchester" was held at Manchester Cathedral on 24 July 2002, to coincide with the arrival of the Commonwealth Games baton, attended by Queen Elizabeth II and The Duke of Edinburgh.
The Games were considered a success for the host city, providing an event to display how Manchester had changed following the 1996 bombing.

1996 Docklands bombing

Docklands bombingCanary Wharf bombCanary Wharf bombing
In February 1996, the IRA had ended its seventeen-month ceasefire with a large truck bomb attack on London's Canary Wharf financial district, though the 3,300-pound bomb of Manchester was three times the size of the Canary Wharf bomb.
A few months later, the IRA detonated another, more powerful truck bomb in Manchester.

Manchester Arndale

Arndale CentreManchester Arndale CentreArndale Centre in Manchester
At about 9:20 am on Saturday 15 June 1996, the Ford van was parked on Corporation Street, outside the Marks & Spencer store, near the Arndale Centre.
It was redeveloped after the 1996 Manchester bombing.

Northern Ireland peace process

peace processceasefireJoint Framework Document
The Downing Street Declaration of 1993 allowed Sinn Féin, a political party associated with the IRA, to participate in all-party peace negotiations on condition that the IRA called a ceasefire.

1992 Manchester bombing

1992A bomb went off in Manchester city centrebombings
On 4 December 1992, the IRA detonated two small bombs in Manchester city centre, forcing police to evacuate thousands of shoppers.
They detonated another, much more powerful bomb in Manchester four years later.

Marks & Spencer

Marks and SpencerM&SMarks and Spencers
At about 9:20 am on Saturday 15 June 1996, the Ford van was parked on Corporation Street, outside the Marks & Spencer store, near the Arndale Centre.
In 1999 M&S opened its shop in Manchester's Exchange Square, which was destroyed in the 1996 Manchester bombing and rebuilt.

UEFA Euro 1996

Euro 19961996Euro 96
At the time, England was hosting the Euro '96 football championships and a Russia vs Germany match was to have taken place in Manchester the following day.
A terrorist attack took place in Manchester on 15 June, one day before the group stage match between Germany and Russia was due to take place in the same city.

Greater Manchester Police

Greater ManchesterGreater Manchester Police AuthorityManchester Police
The perpetrators of the attack have not been caught, and Greater Manchester Police have conceded it is unlikely that anyone will be charged in connection with the bombing.

Royal Exchange, Manchester

Royal Exchange TheatreRoyal ExchangeManchester Royal Exchange
The glass domes of the Corn Exchange and the Royal Exchange were blown in.
The Royal Exchange was heavily damaged in the Manchester Blitz and in the 1996 Manchester bombing.

John Bruton

BrutonJohnBruton Government
Sinn Féin was criticised by Taoiseach John Bruton for being "struck mute" on the attack in the immediate aftermath.
These relations worsened when the IRA killed Jerry McCabe, a member of the Garda Síochána, in a botched post office robbery in County Limerick, and another bomb explosion in Manchester.

Corn Exchange, Manchester

Corn ExchangeThe TriangleThe Triangle, Manchester
The glass domes of the Corn Exchange and the Royal Exchange were blown in.
Following the IRA bomb in 1996 it was renovated and was a modern shopping centre till July 2014.

Richard Leese

Sir Richard LeeseRichard Charles LeeseSir Richard Charles Leese
In an effort to allay fears that Manchester's considerable Irish community might be subjected to reprisal attacks, Councillors Richard Leese and Martin Pagel – leader and deputy leader of Manchester City Council respectively – made a public visit to the Irish World Heritage Centre in Cheetham Hill.
He was knighted in the Queen's Birthday Honours 2006 List after overseeing the 10-year regeneration of the city after the IRA bomb of 1996.

Selfridges

SelfridgeSelfridge & CoSelfridges & Co
The company's fortunes changed during construction, and Selfridges subsequently co-occupied the building; Marks & Spencer leased part of the Lewis's store in the interim.
The Exchange Square store opened in 2002 as Manchester city centre started to return to normal following the 1996 Manchester bombing.

Lewis's

Lewis's Department StoreLewis's Ltd.Lewis's of Liverpool
The company's fortunes changed during construction, and Selfridges subsequently co-occupied the building; Marks & Spencer leased part of the Lewis's store in the interim.
After the 1996 Manchester bombing by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) in Manchester, trading space in Lewis's was rented to Marks & Spencer and other smaller retailers displaced following heavy damage to the Corn Exchange.

The Printworks (Manchester)

The PrintworksPrintworksDaily Dispatch
A large building nearby, now redeveloped as The Printworks and formerly occupied by the Daily Mirror newspaper, had been unoccupied since 1987.
The property was subsequently redeveloped and reopened as a leisure centre as part of the redevelopment of Manchester following the 1996 IRA bombing.

Provisional Irish Republican Army

Provisional IRAIRAPIRA
The 1996 Manchester bombing was an attack carried out by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) on Saturday 15 June 1996.
The renewed bombings caused severe economic damage, with the Manchester bombing and the Docklands bombing causing approximately £800 million in combined damage.

Manchester Cathedral

Manchester Collegiate ChurchManchesterCollegiate Church
A Thanksgiving service for the "Miracle of Manchester" was held at Manchester Cathedral on 24 July 2002, to coincide with the arrival of the Commonwealth Games baton, attended by Queen Elizabeth II and The Duke of Edinburgh.
The cathedral was again damaged in the IRA bombing in June 1996.

Michael Heseltine

Lord HeseltineMichael Heseltine, Baron HeseltineThe Lord Heseltine
On 26 June 1996, Michael Heseltine, the Deputy Prime Minister, announced an international competition for designs of the redevelopment of the bomb-affected area.
Heseltine made several visits to Manchester in the aftermath of the IRA bomb on 15 June 1996 – he won the praise of opposition politicians for cutting red tape to arrange remedial measures.

The Troubles

TroublesNorthern Ireland conflictNorthern Ireland
The attack was followed by several more, most notably the 1996 Manchester bombing, which destroyed a large area of the centre of the city on 15 June.

Car bomb

truck bombcar bombingcar bombs
The IRA detonated a 1500 kg Lorry bomb on Corporation Street in the centre of Manchester, England.

Great Britain

BritishBritainGBR
The biggest bomb detonated in Great Britain since World War II, it targeted the city's infrastructure and economy and caused devastating damage, estimated by insurers at £700 million (equivalent to £ in ) – only surpassed by the 2001 September 11 attacks and the 1993 Bishopsgate bombing in terms of financial cost.