1997 United Kingdom general election

1997 general election19971997 electiongeneral election1997 UK general election1 May 1997general election of 1997May 19971997 elections1997 general election campaign
The 1997 United Kingdom general election was held on Thursday 1 May 1997, five years after the previous general election on 9 April 1992, to elect 659 members to the British House of Commons.wikipedia
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List of MPs elected in the 1997 United Kingdom general election

52nd52nd Parliament1997–2001 Parliament
The 1997 United Kingdom general election was held on Thursday 1 May 1997, five years after the previous general election on 9 April 1992, to elect 659 members to the British House of Commons.
This is a list of Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the House of Commons of the 52nd Parliament of the United Kingdom at the 1997 general election, held on 1 May 1997.

1931 United Kingdom general election

19311931 general election1931 election
For the first time since 1931, the outgoing government lost more than half its parliamentary seats in an election, and over 100 sitting Conservative MPs lost their seats.
It is the most recent election where one party (the Conservatives) received an absolute majority of the votes cast and the last UK general election not to take place on a Thursday, and would be the last election until 1997 in which a party won over 400 seats in the House of Commons.

Tony Blair

BlairTonyPrime Minister Tony Blair
Under the leadership of Tony Blair, the Labour Party ended its eighteen-year spell in opposition and won the general election with a landslide victory, winning 418 seats, a landslide majority of 179 seats, the most seats the party has ever held to date, and the highest proportion of seats held by any party in the post-war period. Labour had elected John Smith as its party leader in 1992, but his death from a heart attack in 1994 led the way for Tony Blair to become Labour leader. Labour's victory was largely credited to the charisma of Tony Blair and a Labour public relations machine managed by Alastair Campbell and Peter Mandelson.
In 1997, the Labour Party won a landslide general election victory, the largest in its history.

2017 United Kingdom general election

2017 general election20172017 UK general election
However, 1997 was the last general election in which Labour had a net gain of seats until the snap 2017 general election 20 years later.
In a surprising result, the Conservative Party made a net loss of 13 seats with 42.4% of the vote (its highest share of the vote since 1983), whereas Labour made a net gain of 30 seats with 40.0% (its highest vote share since 2001 and the first time the party had gained seats since 1997).

National Minimum Wage Act 1998

national minimum wageminimum wageNMWA 1998
Labour made several campaign pledges such as the creation of a National Minimum Wage, devolution referendums for Scotland and Wales and promised greater economic competence than the Conservatives, who were unpopular following the events of Black Wednesday in 1992; from then until 1997, the party consistently trailed behind Labour in the opinion polls.
It was a flagship policy of the Labour Party in the UK during their successful 1997 general election campaign.

Theresa May

MayPrime Ministernew Prime Minister
However, future Prime Minister Theresa May was elected to the safe Conservative seat of Maidenhead, and future Speakers John Bercow at Buckingham and Lindsay Hoyle at Chorley.
May served as Home Secretary from 2010 to 2016 and has been member of Parliament (MP) for Maidenhead since 1997.

John Major

Sir John MajorMajorPrime Minister
The Conservative Party was led by incumbent Prime Minister John Major and ran their campaign emphasising falling unemployment and a strong economic recovery following the early 1990s recession.
Major went on to lose the 1997 general election five months later, in one of the largest electoral defeats since the Great Reform Act of 1832.

Malcolm Rifkind

Sir Malcolm RifkindRifkind The Right Honourable '''Malcolm Rifkind''' QC
The party was left with no seats whatsoever in Scotland or Wales, and many key Conservative politicians, including Defence Secretary Michael Portillo, Foreign Secretary Malcolm Rifkind, Trade Secretary Ian Lang, Scottish Secretary Michael Forsyth and former ministers Edwina Currie, Norman Lamont, David Mellor and Neil Hamilton lost their parliamentary seats.
Rifkind was the MP for Edinburgh Pentlands from 1974 to 1997.

Landslide victory

landslidelandslide electionlandslide victories
Under the leadership of Tony Blair, the Labour Party ended its eighteen-year spell in opposition and won the general election with a landslide victory, winning 418 seats, a landslide majority of 179 seats, the most seats the party has ever held to date, and the highest proportion of seats held by any party in the post-war period.

Michael Portillo

Portillo The Right Honourable '''Michael PortilloMichael Denzil Xavier Portillo
The party was left with no seats whatsoever in Scotland or Wales, and many key Conservative politicians, including Defence Secretary Michael Portillo, Foreign Secretary Malcolm Rifkind, Trade Secretary Ian Lang, Scottish Secretary Michael Forsyth and former ministers Edwina Currie, Norman Lamont, David Mellor and Neil Hamilton lost their parliamentary seats.
Portillo unexpectedly lost the hitherto safely Conservative Enfield Southgate seat at the 1997 general election.

Neil Hamilton (politician)

Neil HamiltonNeilalong with the BBC
The party was left with no seats whatsoever in Scotland or Wales, and many key Conservative politicians, including Defence Secretary Michael Portillo, Foreign Secretary Malcolm Rifkind, Trade Secretary Ian Lang, Scottish Secretary Michael Forsyth and former ministers Edwina Currie, Norman Lamont, David Mellor and Neil Hamilton lost their parliamentary seats.
He was previously a Conservative MP for the Tatton constituency from 1983 to 1997.

New Labour

Labour1997–2010 Labour governmentLabour government
Under Blair's leadership, the Labour Party had adopted a more centrist policy platform under the name 'New Labour'.
Following the leadership of Neil Kinnock and John Smith, the party under the New Labour brand attempted to widen its electoral appeal and by the 1997 general election it had made significant gains in the upper and middle-classes, effectively giving the party a landslide victory.

Gordon Brown

BrownJames Gordon BrownMr. Brown
Labour also reversed its policy on unilateral nuclear disarmament and the events of Black Wednesday allowed Labour to promise greater economic management under the Chancellorship of Gordon Brown.
He served as chancellor of the Exchequer from 1997 to 2007.

Maidenhead (UK Parliament constituency)

MaidenheadMaidenhead CCMaidenhead constituency
However, future Prime Minister Theresa May was elected to the safe Conservative seat of Maidenhead, and future Speakers John Bercow at Buckingham and Lindsay Hoyle at Chorley.
Since its creation at the 1997 General Election, the seat has been held by Conservative Member of Parliament Theresa May who served as Home Secretary from 2010-2016 and as Prime Minister from 2016-2019.

Lindsay Hoyle

Sir Lindsay Hoyle1Hon. Lindsay Hoyle
However, future Prime Minister Theresa May was elected to the safe Conservative seat of Maidenhead, and future Speakers John Bercow at Buckingham and Lindsay Hoyle at Chorley.
He has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for Chorley since 1997.

All-women shortlist

all-women shortlistsall women shortlistall-woman shortlist
This was in part thanks to Labour's policy of using all-women shortlists.
Labour used all-women shortlists to select candidates in half of all winnable seats for the 1997 general election, with the aim of reaching 100 female MPs post-election; a goal that was achieved.

Black Wednesday

Black Wednesday UK currency crisisBritain's ejection from the Exchange Rate Mechanismcambial crisis
Labour made several campaign pledges such as the creation of a National Minimum Wage, devolution referendums for Scotland and Wales and promised greater economic competence than the Conservatives, who were unpopular following the events of Black Wednesday in 1992; from then until 1997, the party consistently trailed behind Labour in the opinion polls.
The crisis damaged the credibility of the Second Major ministry in handling of economic matters – the Conservative Party suffered a landslide defeat five years later at the 1997 United Kingdom general election and did not return to power until 2010.

George Gardiner (politician)

George GardinerSir George GardinerGeorge Arthur Gardiner, MP
*Sir George Gardiner (Reigate)
Two months before the 1997 general election he defected to the Referendum Party, becoming the only MP it ever had.

1906 United Kingdom general election

19061906 general election1906 election
However, a series of scandals, party division over the European Union, the events of Black Wednesday and a desire of the electorate for change after 18 years of Conservative rule all contributed to the Conservatives' worst defeat since 1906, with only 165 MPs elected to Westminster, as well as their lowest share of the vote since 1832.
This has resulted in the 1906 general election being dubbed the "Liberal landslide", and is now ranked alongside the 1931, 1945, 1983 and 1997 general elections as one of the largest landslide election victories.

1997 United Kingdom local elections

1997local elections1997 local elections
The election was scheduled for 1 May, to coincide with the local elections on the same day.
The elections were held on the same day as the general election.

John Smith (Labour Party leader)

John SmithJohn Smith MPfuture Labour Party Leader John Smith
Labour had elected John Smith as its party leader in 1992, but his death from a heart attack in 1994 led the way for Tony Blair to become Labour leader.
This frustrated many modernisers like Tony Blair and Gordon Brown and after Smith's sudden death in May 1994, he was succeeded as Leader by Blair, who undertook the subsequent re-branding of Labour as New Labour, winning the 1997 general election in a landslide.

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
The Conservative Party was led by incumbent Prime Minister John Major and ran their campaign emphasising falling unemployment and a strong economic recovery following the early 1990s recession.
But as the 1997 general election loomed, despite their high-profile New Labour, New Danger campaign, it was still looking certain that Labour would win.

Peter Mandelson

Lord MandelsonThe Lord MandelsonMandelson
Labour's victory was largely credited to the charisma of Tony Blair and a Labour public relations machine managed by Alastair Campbell and Peter Mandelson.
Mandelson was one of several key individuals responsible for the rebranding of the Labour Party as New Labour before its subsequent victory in the 1997 election.

Michael Howard

Michael Howard, Baron Howard of LympneThe Lord Howard of LympneLord Howard of Lympne
Meanwhile, there was also division amongst the Conservative cabinet, with Chancellor Kenneth Clarke describing the views of Home Secretary Michael Howard on Europe as "paranoid and xenophobic nonsense".
Following the Conservative Party's landslide defeat at the 1997 general election, he unsuccessfully contested the leadership, and subsequently held the posts of Shadow Foreign Secretary (1997–1999) and Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer (2001–2003).

New Labour, New Life for Britain

1997 Labour Party manifestopledge-card
A manifesto, entitled New Labour, New Life For Britain was released in 1996 and outlined five key pledges:
The manifesto set out the party's new "Third Way" centrist approach to policy, with subsequent success at the 1997 general election.