2001 United Kingdom census

Form used to poll English households during the 2001 Census.

Conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday, 29 April 2001.

- 2001 United Kingdom census

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Members of the Asian community with the then prime minister David Cameron in 2014

British Asian

Asians in the United Kingdom (also referred to as Asian Britons and British Asians) are a multi-ethnic group of UK residents who, regardless of citizenship status, identify as and are perceived to be Asian people.

Asians in the United Kingdom (also referred to as Asian Britons and British Asians) are a multi-ethnic group of UK residents who, regardless of citizenship status, identify as and are perceived to be Asian people.

Members of the Asian community with the then prime minister David Cameron in 2014
British Asian professionals at a networking event in the City of London
The East London Mosque, is one of the largest mosques in Europe, and the biggest in the UK
Munshi I'tisam-ud-Din was the first South Asian to travel and live in Europe, and write about his experiences
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi who studied in England played a pivotal role in leading the Indian independence movement
Shahidul Alam was one of the persons of the year selected by Time magazine in 2018
ArcelorMittal Orbit, London Olympic Park, designated by the Indian Anish Kapoor
Mohammed Salim, the first South Asian footballer to play for a foreign club. Due to playing in bare feet, he is having them bandaged by Jimmy McMenemy in 1936.
Amir Khan (left), with American boxer Paulie Malignaggi (right)
Hammad Miah is a professional snooker player of Bengali origin.
Shazia Mirza is a popular British comedian
The award-winning dance act Signature involved a British Pakistani and a British Indian
An Asian business leader showcasing his awards at the Grange Hotel in London
British Asian musicians combining Eastern and Western musical traditions
The Asian Professional Awards from left to right: Onkardeep Singh MBE; Jasvir Singh OBE; Sunny & Shay Grewal; Harry Virdee; Param Singh MBE
A Shaheed Minar in Altab Ali Park, Whitechapel renamed in honour of the Bangladeshi racial victim Altab Ali

Since the 2001 census, British people of general Asian descent have been included in the "Asian/Asian British" grouping ("Asian, Asian Scottish or Asian British" grouping in Scotland) of the UK census questionnaires.

Form used to poll English households during the 2001 Census.

Census in the United Kingdom

Coincident full censuses have taken place in the different jurisdictions of the United Kingdom every ten years since 1801, with the exceptions of 1941 (during the Second World War), Ireland in 1921/Northern Ireland in 1931, and Scotland in 2021 (because of the COVID-19 pandemic).

Coincident full censuses have taken place in the different jurisdictions of the United Kingdom every ten years since 1801, with the exceptions of 1941 (during the Second World War), Ireland in 1921/Northern Ireland in 1931, and Scotland in 2021 (because of the COVID-19 pandemic).

Form used to poll English households during the 2001 Census.

However, the 2001 census was the first in which the government asked about religion on the main census form.

The ethnic group question used in the 2011 census in England. In Wales, "Welsh" and "English" were listed in the opposite order of the "White" column. The options in Scotland and Northern Ireland were slightly different from those in England and Wales.

Mixed (United Kingdom ethnicity category)

The ethnic group question used in the 2011 census in England. In Wales, "Welsh" and "English" were listed in the opposite order of the "White" column. The options in Scotland and Northern Ireland were slightly different from those in England and Wales.

Mixed is an ethnicity category that has been used by the United Kingdom's Office for National Statistics since the 2001 Census.

Ridley Road Market in Dalston, London, which sells African-Caribbean music, textiles, and food including goat meat, yams, mangos and spices.

British African-Caribbean people

British African-Caribbean people are a cultural group in the United Kingdom.

British African-Caribbean people are a cultural group in the United Kingdom.

Ridley Road Market in Dalston, London, which sells African-Caribbean music, textiles, and food including goat meat, yams, mangos and spices.
Photograph of Mary Seacole, taken for a carte de visite by Maull & Company in London (c. undefined1873)
Bajan and Trinidadian pilots in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War.
In 1998, an area of public open space in Brixton was renamed Windrush Square to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the arrival of the ship bringing the first large group of West Indian migrants to the United Kingdom.
Dancers at the Notting Hill Carnival
Tate Britain, which houses works by Donald Rodney and Sonia Boyce
Diane Abbott, born to Jamaican parents, became the first black woman elected to the House of Commons in 1987.
Rio Ferdinand, whose father came from St. Lucia to Britain, is a former captain of the English national team.
Fabian Delph, of Guyanese ancestry, won the 2017–18 Premier League with Manchester City and represented England at the 2018 FIFA World Cup
Former Derby County player Michael Johnson, a player who has played for the Jamaica national football team
Scotch bonnet peppers imported from the Caribbean on sale at London's Brixton Market. The peppers are a key ingredient of "Jerk" dishes.
A shop in Electric Avenue, Brixton. In 1999 the street was hit by a nail-bomb planted by neo-nazi David Copeland. Copeland later stated that he was deliberately targeting the local African-Caribbean community.
Former Musical Youth Frontman Dennis Seaton in 2005
Successful DJ and musician Goldie, born to Scottish and Jamaican parents

In the UK Census of 2001, 565,876 people classified themselves in the category 'Black Caribbean', amounting to around 1 per cent of the total population.

The Union and Cornish flags.

Cornish people

Ethnic group native to, or associated with Cornwall and a recognised national minority in the United Kingdom, which can trace its roots to the ancient Britons who inhabited southern and central Great Britain before the Roman conquest.

Ethnic group native to, or associated with Cornwall and a recognised national minority in the United Kingdom, which can trace its roots to the ancient Britons who inhabited southern and central Great Britain before the Roman conquest.

The Union and Cornish flags.
A poster in Cornwall telling people how to describe their ethnicity and national identity as Cornish in the 2011 census
Mên-an-Tol is an ancient lith site in Cornwall
An 18th century map of Great Britain based on accounts from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, showing "Cornweallas"
European nations in AD 998
The Cornish language experienced a shift between 1300 and 1750, with the Cornish people gradually adopting English as their common language.
The National Tartan of Cornwall. Cornish kilts and tartans are emblematic of a resurgent, pan-Celtic Cornish identity developed during Cornwall's Celtic Revival.
Cornish miners in the mid-19th century. A demise in mining in Cornwall prompted an exodus of Cornish miners and families resulting in a displaced Cornish diaspora.
William "Harold" Oliver was the son of Australian Cornish immigrants who lived in the mining town of Waukaringa. Harold Oliver was a three time national champion with the Port Adelaide Football Club in 1910, 1913 and 1914.
A silver mining museum in Mineral del Monte, a remnant of the Cornish migration to Mexico during the early-19th century.
St. Piran's Day is an annual patronal Cornish festival celebrating Cornish culture and history every 5 March.
A welcome sign to Penzance, in the English and Cornish languages
The 'Obby 'Oss festival is a Cornish May Day festival celebrated in Padstow.
A Cornish pasty
Cornish wrestling is a contact sport, a style of folk martial arts, that has its origins in Cornwall
The surviving part of the former Duchy Palace in Lostwithiel, the former administrative seat of the Duke of Cornwall from c.1265 to 1874.
The Old County Hall in Truro, the former seat of Cornwall Council.

In the United Kingdom Census 2001, despite no explicit "Cornish" option being available, approximately 34,000 people in Cornwall and 3,500 people elsewhere in the UK—a combined total equal to nearly 7 per cent of the population of Cornwall—identified themselves as ethnic Cornish by writing this in under the "other" ethnicity option.

Geocode cells of Geohash, with 8 (blue) and 9 (yellow) digits, a typical hierarchical grid, comparing with latitude-longitude (12 or more digits). A museum is a typical location to be pointed by a geocode, its gate need ~20 meters of precision.

ONS coding system

ONS codes are geocodes maintained by the United Kingdom's Office for National Statistics to represent a wide range of geographical areas of the UK, for use in tabulating census and other statistical data.

ONS codes are geocodes maintained by the United Kingdom's Office for National Statistics to represent a wide range of geographical areas of the UK, for use in tabulating census and other statistical data.

Geocode cells of Geohash, with 8 (blue) and 9 (yellow) digits, a typical hierarchical grid, comparing with latitude-longitude (12 or more digits). A museum is a typical location to be pointed by a geocode, its gate need ~20 meters of precision.

Census output areas (OA). These are the smallest unit for which census data are published - they were initially generated to support publication of 2001 Census outputs and contain at least 40 households and 100 persons, the target size being 125 households. They were built up from postcode blocks after the census data were available, with the intention of standardising population sizes, geographical shape and social homogeneity (in terms of dwelling types and housing tenure). The OAs generated in 2001 were retained as far as possible for the publication of outputs from the 2011 Census (less than 3% were changed ). Before 2001, census data were published for larger Enumeration Districts (ED) which were delineated before the census was conducted and were the organisational units for census data collection.

Map showing the percentage of British people of Pakistani descent by region, and locations of Pakistani communities with more than 20,000 people in the UK.

British Pakistanis

British Pakistanis ( (Bratānia men maqīm pākstānī); also known as Pakistani British people or Pakistani Britons) are citizens or residents of the United Kingdom whose ancestral roots lie in Pakistan.

British Pakistanis ( (Bratānia men maqīm pākstānī); also known as Pakistani British people or Pakistani Britons) are citizens or residents of the United Kingdom whose ancestral roots lie in Pakistan.

Map showing the percentage of British people of Pakistani descent by region, and locations of Pakistani communities with more than 20,000 people in the UK.
A chart showing the location of birth for British Pakistanis in 2001 (by location against percentage born there)
A return of British Airways has been reported as one of Imran Khan's greatest achievements.
Bradford, in the north of England, is considered to be a typical "mill and mosque town" due to its large Pakistani community.
The Curry Mile on Wilmslow Road in Manchester is home to a myriad of Pakistani bakers, delicatessens and handmade jewellery in addition to several halal restaurants and take-aways.
The Balti is an example of British Pakistani cuisine.
British-Pakistani Ash Amin is the Chair of Geography at Cambridge University.
Pakistani mangos, which were until recently only stocked by British Asian retailers, are now sold in prestigious department stores, such as Harrods and Selfridges.
One in seven British Pakistanis works as a taxi driver, cab driver or chauffeur.
Sajid Javid, Conservative MP for Bromsgrove, is the former Chancellor of the Exchequer. He was the Vice-President of Chase Manhattan Bank before working as a Managing Director for Deutsche Bank.

This represented an increase of 427,000 over the 747,285 residents recorded in the 2001 UK Census.

The BAPS Shri Swaminarayan Mandir London is one of the largest Hindu temples in the world outside India

British Indians

British Indians are citizens of the United Kingdom (UK) whose ancestral roots are from India.

British Indians are citizens of the United Kingdom (UK) whose ancestral roots are from India.

The BAPS Shri Swaminarayan Mandir London is one of the largest Hindu temples in the world outside India
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi meets British Indian children in London in 2015
Chicken tikka masala is regarded as a British national dish.
Param Singh at the British Indian Awards in 2019
Singer, Jay Sean
Conservative MP Priti Patel, current UK Home Secretary and first British Indian cabinet minister
Sophia Duleep Singh - British Indian suffragette sells newspapers
Rock Against Racism marches were commonplace in the United Kingdom in response to racist attacks on racial minorities
Tamils protesting against the Sri Lankan Civil War outside India House
A traditional Indian wedding in Nottingham, 2006

According to the 2001 UK Census, 1,053,411 Britons had full Indian ethnicity (representing 1.8% of the UK's population).

Owain Glyndŵr was proclaimed Prince of Wales by his supporters on 16 September 1400. The last native Welsh person to hold the title.

Welsh people

Ethnic group native to Wales.

Ethnic group native to Wales.

Owain Glyndŵr was proclaimed Prince of Wales by his supporters on 16 September 1400. The last native Welsh person to hold the title.
The proportion of respondents in the 2011 census who said they could speak Welsh
Flag of the city of Puerto Madryn, Argentina, inspired by the Flag of Wales, owing to the Welsh immigration
John Adams, the second President of the United States (1797–1801), whose paternal great-grandfather David Adams, born and bred at Fferm Penybanc, Llanboidy, Carmarthenshire, emigrated from Wales in 1675

In 2001, it is uncertain how many people in Wales considered themselves to be of Welsh ethnicity; the 2001 UK census did not offer 'Welsh' as an option; respondents had to use a box marked "Other".

Irish migration from the island of Ireland (green) to Great Britain (red).

Irish migration to Great Britain

Irish migration to Great Britain has occurred from the earliest recorded history to the present.

Irish migration to Great Britain has occurred from the earliest recorded history to the present.

Irish migration from the island of Ireland (green) to Great Britain (red).
Memorial to the "Forgotten Irish" of London, Church of the Sacred Heart, Kilburn.

According to the UK 2001 Census, white Irish-born residents make up 1.2% of those living in England and Wales.