2002 Oakland Athletics season

Oakland Athletics20022002 Oakland Athletics2002 seasonAthleticsOakland2002 AthleticsAits 2002 seasonOakland A
The Oakland Athletics' 2002 season was the team's 35th in Oakland, California.wikipedia
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Moneyball (film)

Moneyballfilm adaptation2011 film
A film adaptation of the book, also titled Moneyball, was released in 2011.
The film is based on Michael Lewis's 2003 nonfiction book of the same name, an account of the Oakland Athletics baseball team's 2002 season and their general manager Billy Beane's attempts to assemble a competitive team.

Moneyball

Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Gamebookbook of the same name
The Athletics' season was the subject of Michael Lewis's 2003 book Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game (Lewis was given the opportunity to follow the team around throughout the season).
By re-evaluating their strategy in this way, the 2002 Athletics, with approximately $44 million in salary, were competitive with larger market teams such as the New York Yankees, who spent over $125 million in payroll that season.

2002 Anaheim Angels season

Anaheim Angels2002Angels
The club's late-season surge allowed it to hold off the Anaheim Angels, who finished four games behind them at 99-63. They were defeated in the 2002 American League Division Series three games to two by the American League Central champion Minnesota Twins, who would be defeated in the 2002 American League Championship Series by the eventual World Series champion Anaheim Angels.

2002 Boston Red Sox season

2002Boston Red SoxRed Sox
During the 2001–02 offseason, the team lost three key free agents to larger market teams: 2000 AL MVP Jason Giambi to the New York Yankees, outfielder Johnny Damon to the Boston Red Sox, and closer Jason Isringhausen to the St. Louis Cardinals.

Miguel Tejada

Tejada
The Athletics' 18th and 19th wins came courtesy of game-ending hits by shortstop Miguel Tejada.
Tejada hit .308 with 34 homers and led the A's to their second Western Division title in three years.

Oakland Athletics

Oakland AAthleticsPhiladelphia Athletics
The Oakland Athletics' 2002 season was the team's 35th in Oakland, California.
The 2003 Michael Lewis book Moneyball chronicles the 2002 Oakland Athletics season, with a specific focus on Billy Beane's economic approach to managing the organization under significant financial constraints.

2002 World Series

2002World SeriesWorld Series championship
They were defeated in the 2002 American League Division Series three games to two by the American League Central champion Minnesota Twins, who would be defeated in the 2002 American League Championship Series by the eventual World Series champion Anaheim Angels.
The Angels spent much of the season trailing the first-place Seattle Mariners and on occasion the Oakland Athletics in the AL West standings.

American League West

AL WestWestern DivisionWest Division
The Athletics clinched the American League West with a regular season record of 103–59, advancing to the first round of the postseason.

2002 American League Championship Series

2002ALCSAmerican League Championship Series
They were defeated in the 2002 American League Division Series three games to two by the American League Central champion Minnesota Twins, who would be defeated in the 2002 American League Championship Series by the eventual World Series champion Anaheim Angels.

California

CAState of CaliforniaCalifornia, USA
The Oakland Athletics' 2002 season was the team's 35th in Oakland, California.

Billy Beane

Bill Beane
Billy Beane, the team's general manager, responded with a series of under-the-radar free agent signings. Faced with a number of significant roster holes, general manager Billy Beane sought to replace Damon and Giambi with free agent hitters Scott Hatteberg, David Justice, and Ray Durham (among others).

Winning streak (sports)

winning streakwin streakwinning streaks
The team is most famous, however, for winning 20 consecutive games between August 13 and September 4, 2002.

Michael Lewis

Lewis, MichaelMichael M. LewisAgainst the Rules with Michael Lewis
The Athletics' season was the subject of Michael Lewis's 2003 book Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game (Lewis was given the opportunity to follow the team around throughout the season).

David Justice

Dave Justice
Faced with a number of significant roster holes, general manager Billy Beane sought to replace Damon and Giambi with free agent hitters Scott Hatteberg, David Justice, and Ray Durham (among others).

2002 New York Yankees season

New York Yankees2002Yankees
During the 2001–02 offseason, the team lost three key free agents to larger market teams: 2000 AL MVP Jason Giambi to the New York Yankees, outfielder Johnny Damon to the Boston Red Sox, and closer Jason Isringhausen to the St. Louis Cardinals.