2003 invasion of Iraqwikipedia
The 2003 invasion of Iraq was the first stage of the Iraq War (also called Operation Iraqi Freedom).
2003 invasion of Iraqinvasion of IraqIraq War2003 Iraq WarIraqinvasion2003 invasionOperation Iraqi Freedomwar in IraqU.S. invasion of Iraq

Multi-National Force – Iraq

Coalitioncoalition forcesmultinational force in Iraq
36 other countries were involved in its aftermath.
The Multi-National Force – Iraq (MNF–I), often referred to as the coalition forces, was a military command during the 2003 invasion of Iraq and much of the ensuing Iraq War, led by the United States of America (Operation Iraqi Freedom), United Kingdom (Operation TELIC), Australia, Spain and Poland, responsible for conducting and handling military operations.

Coalition Provisional Authority

IraqCPACoalition Provisional Authority
This early stage of the war formally ended on 1 May 2003 when U.S. President George W. Bush declared the "end of major combat operations", after which the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) was established as the first of several successive transitional governments leading up to the first Iraqi parliamentary election in January 2005.
The Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA; سلطة الائتلاف المؤقتة) was a transitional government of Iraq established following the invasion of the country on 19 March 2003 by the U.S.-led Multinational Force (or 'the coalition') and the fall of Ba'athist Iraq.

Protests against the Iraq War

protests against the Iraq Waranti-war protestsworldwide popular protests
On 15 February 2003, a month before the invasion, there were worldwide protests against the Iraq War, including a rally of three million people in Rome, which the Guinness Book of Records listed as the largest ever anti-war rally.
Beginning in 2002, and continuing after the 2003 invasion of Iraq, large-scale protests against the Iraq War were held in many cities worldwide, often coordinated to occur simultaneously around the world.

Neoconservatism

neoconservativeneoconservatismneoconservatives
Others place a much greater emphasis on the impact of the September 11 attacks, on the role this played in changing U.S. strategic calculations, and the rise of the freedom agenda.
Many of its adherents became politically famous during the Republican presidential administrations of the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s as neoconservatives peaked in influence during the administration of George W. Bush, when they played a major role in promoting and planning the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

Iraqi Army

Iraqi ArmyArmyIraqi forces
On 26 March, the 173rd Airborne Brigade was airdropped near the northern city of Kirkuk, where they joined forces with Kurdish rebels and fought several actions against the Iraqi Army to secure the northern part of the country.
Following the invasion of Iraq by U.S. forces in 2003, the Iraqi Army was rebuilt along American lines with enormous amounts of U.S. military assistance at every level.

Battle of Nasiriyah

Nasiriyahbattle of Nasiriyahfought through Nasiriyah
While special forces launched an amphibious assault from the Persian Gulf to secure Basra and the surrounding petroleum fields, the main invasion army moved into southern Iraq, occupying the region and engaging in the Battle of Nasiriyah on 23 March.
The Battle of Nasiriyah was fought between the US 2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade and Iraqi forces from the 23rd March to 2nd April 2003 during the US-led invasion of Iraq.

Operation Northern Delay

airdroppeda combat jumpparachute drop
On 26 March, the 173rd Airborne Brigade was airdropped near the northern city of Kirkuk, where they joined forces with Kurdish rebels and fought several actions against the Iraqi Army to secure the northern part of the country.
Operation Northern Delay occurred on 26 March 2003 as part of the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

Iraqi Kurdistan

Kurdistannorthern IraqKurdistan Region
The coalition forces also received support from the Peshmerga in Iraqi Kurdistan.
The 2003 invasion of Iraq and subsequent political changes led to the ratification of a new constitution in 2005.

15 February 2003 anti-war protests

15 February 2003 anti-war protestFebruary 15, 200315 February 2003, anti-war protests
Opposition to the invasion coalesced in the worldwide 15 February 2003 anti-war protest that attracted between six and ten million people in more than 800 cities, the largest such protest in human history according to the Guinness Book of World Records.
On 15 February 2003, there was a coordinated day of protests across the world in which people in more than 600 cities expressed opposition to the imminent Iraq War.

Operation Southern Watch

Southern WatchOperations Southern WatchOperations Southern
The U.S. and its allies tried to keep Saddam in check with military actions such as Operation Southern Watch, which was conducted by Joint Task Force Southwest Asia (JTF-SWA) with the mission of monitoring and controlling airspace south of the 32nd Parallel (extended to the 33rd Parallel in 1996) as well as using economic sanctions.
United States Central Command's Joint Task Force Southwest Asia (JTF-SWA) had the mission of monitoring and controlling the airspace south of the 32nd Parallel (extended to the 33rd Parallel in 1996) in southern and south-central Iraq during the period following the end of the 1991 Gulf War until the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

Ba'athist Iraq

IraqIraqiIraqi Republic
The invasion phase began on 20 March 2003 and lasted just over one month, including 21 days of major combat operations, in which a combined force of troops from the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and Poland invaded Iraq.
In 2003, U.S. and coalition forces invaded Iraq, and the Ba'athist Iraqi regime was deposed less than a month later.

Iraq War

IraqOperation Iraqi Freedomwar in Iraq
The 2003 invasion of Iraq was the first stage of the Iraq War (also called Operation Iraqi Freedom).
The Iraq War was a protracted armed conflict that began in 2003 with the invasion of Iraq by a United States-led coalition that overthrew the government of Saddam Hussein.

Preparations for 2003 invasion of Iraq

preparing for the invasion of IraqAzores summitPPolitical preparations for 2003 invasion of Iraq
In March 2003, the United States, United Kingdom, Poland, Australia, Spain, Denmark, and Italy began preparing for the invasion of Iraq, with a host of public relations and military moves.
The 2003 invasion of Iraq began on March 20. On March 18, US President George W. Bush had set a deadline for the ruler of Iraq, Saddam Hussein, and his two sons, Uday and Qusay, to leave the country or face military action.

Iraqi parliamentary election, January 2005

democratic electionsJanuary 2005 electionsJanuary 2005
This early stage of the war formally ended on 1 May 2003 when U.S. President George W. Bush declared the "end of major combat operations", after which the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) was established as the first of several successive transitional governments leading up to the first Iraqi parliamentary election in January 2005.
The voting represented the first general election since the United States-led 2003 invasion of Iraq, and marked an important step in the transition of turning control of the country over from United States occupation forces to the Iraqis themselves.

Bush Doctrine

policy makersBush doctrine of pre-emptive warGeorge W. Bush's foreign policy
This announcement was accompanied by the doctrine of "pre-emptive" military action, later termed the Bush Doctrine.
The Bush Doctrine became strongly associated with the Bush administration's decision to invade Iraq in 2003.

Kirkuk

Kirkuk, IraqKirkukKerkuk
On 26 March, the 173rd Airborne Brigade was airdropped near the northern city of Kirkuk, where they joined forces with Kurdish rebels and fought several actions against the Iraqi Army to secure the northern part of the country.
The city currently consists mainly of people who self-identify as Kurds, Arabs, Iraqi Turkmens and Assyrians, with changes in population after the fall of Saddam Hussein, the US invasion, and the war against the Islamic State.

Uday Hussein

UdayUday Husseinfound outside the Iraqi Football Association office
In his 17 March 2003 address to the nation, Bush demanded that Saddam and his two sons, Uday and Qusay, surrender and leave Iraq, giving them a 48-hour deadline.
Following the United States-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, he was killed alongside his brother Qusay and nephew Mustapha by Task Force 121 after a three-hour gunfight in Mosul.

United Nations Security Council and the Iraq War

oppositionUnited Nations Spresentation to the UN Security CouncilUN Security Council and the Iraq war
His presentation to the UN Security Council, which contained a computer generated image of a "mobile biological weapons laboratory".
The 2003 invasion of Iraq began a few days later.

Blair ministry

Labour governmentBlair governmentBlair (I–III)
The vote was a key moment in the history of the Blair administration, as the number of government MPs who rebelled against the vote was the greatest since the repeal of the Corn Laws in 1846.
However, the Labour government had attracted controversy by sending British troops to fight in Afghanistan in the aftermath of the 11 September terrorist attacks on the United States in 2001, and even more so when it joined the American-led invasion of Iraq eighteen months later – particularly when it emerged that the ousted Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's alleged weapons of mass destruction were never found, and serious questions were raised about the issue of going to war.

Ansar al-Islam

Ansar al-IslamJund al-IslamAnsar
This joint team (called the Northern Iraq Liaison Element (NILE)) combined to defeat Ansar al-Islam, a group with ties to al-Qaeda, in Iraqi Kurdistan.
Following the 2003 invasion of Iraq, the group became an insurgent group which fought against the Kurdish government, American led forces and their Iraqi allies.

Sanctions against Iraq

sanctions against Iraqsanctionseconomic sanctions
This policy involved numerous economic sanctions by the UN Security Council; the enforcement of Iraqi no-fly zones declared by the U.S. and the UK to protect the Kurds in Iraqi Kurdistan and Shias in the south from aerial attacks by the Iraqi government; and ongoing inspections.
Whereas it was widely believed that the sanctions caused a major rise in child mortality, research following the 2003 invasion of Iraq has shown that commonly cited data were doctored by the Saddam Hussein regime and that "there was no major rise in child mortality in Iraq after 1990 and during the period of the sanctions".

Special Activities Division

SADSAD/SOGSpecial Operations Group
The Central Intelligence Agency's Special Activities Division (SAD) teams, consisting of the paramilitary operations officers and 10th Special Forces Group soldiers, were the first U.S. forces to enter Iraq, in July 2002, before the main invasion.
SAD/SOG units also defeated Ansar al-Islam in Iraqi Kurdistan prior to the invasion of Iraq in 2003 and trained, equipped, organized and led the Kurdish peshmerga forces to defeat the Iraqi Army in northern Iraq.

History of Iraq (2003–2011)

occupation of Iraqoccupationpost-invasion Iraq
Thereafter, the Bush administration briefly used the term Coalition of the Willing to refer to the countries who supported, militarily or verbally, the military action in Iraq and subsequent military presence in post-invasion Iraq since 2003.
The history of Iraq from 2003 to 2011 is characterized by a large United States military deployment on Iraqi territory, beginning with the U.S.-led invasion of the country in March 2003 which overthrew the Ba'ath Party government of Saddam Hussein and ending with the departure of US troops from the country in 2011 (though the Iraq War that commenced in 2003 continued and subsequently intensified during 2013).

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
The invasion phase began on 20 March 2003 and lasted just over one month, including 21 days of major combat operations, in which a combined force of troops from the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and Poland invaded Iraq.
However, controversy surrounds some of Britain's overseas military deployments, particularly in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Operation Telic

IraqOp TELICOperation TELIC
The United Kingdom military operation was named Operation Telic.
Operation Telic (Op TELIC) was the codename under which all of the United Kingdom's military operations in Iraq were conducted between the start of the Invasion of Iraq on 19 March 2003 and the withdrawal of the last remaining British forces on 22 May 2011.