2004–05 NHL lockout

NHL lockoutlockout2004–05 lockout2004–05 NHL lock-out2004 NHL Lockoutlabour dispute2004-05 NHL lockout2004–05NHL lock-outlabor dispute
The 2004–05 NHL lockout was a labor lockout that resulted in the cancellation of the National Hockey League (NHL) season, which would have been its 88th season of play.wikipedia
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National Hockey League

NHLhockeyNational Hockey League (NHL)
The 2004–05 NHL lockout was a labor lockout that resulted in the cancellation of the National Hockey League (NHL) season, which would have been its 88th season of play.
After a labour-management dispute that led to the cancellation of the entire 2004–05 season, the league resumed play in 2005–06 under a new collective agreement that included a salary cap.

Stanley Cup

Stanley CupsSt-CupCup
As a result, the Stanley Cup was not awarded, for the first time since 1919.
It was not awarded in 1919 because of a Spanish flu epidemic and in 2005 because of the 2004–05 NHL lockout.

1994–95 Major League Baseball strike

strikeplayers' strike1994 Major League Baseball strike
Among the major professional sports leagues in North America, this was the first (and so far only) time a whole season was canceled because of a labor dispute, and the second time a postseason was canceled (after the 1994–1995 MLB strike).
The strike was suspended on April 2, 1995, after 232 days, making it the longest such stoppage in MLB history and the longest work stoppage in major league professional sports at the time (breaking the record set by the 1981 strike); its length would be surpassed by the 2004–05 NHL lockout, which ran for 310 days and caused the cancellation of that league's entire 2004–05 season.

1994–95 NHL lockout

lockoutlockout-shortened1994-95 NHL lockout
The lockout was initiated on September 16, 2004, one day after the expiration of the existing collective bargaining agreement (CBA), which itself had been the result of the 1994–95 lockout. Most sports commentators saw Bettman's plan as reasonable, but some critics pointed out that a hard salary cap without any revenue sharing was an attempt to gain the support of the big market teams, such as Toronto, Montreal, Detroit, the New York Rangers, Vancouver, and Philadelphia, teams that did not support Bettman during the 1994–95 lockout.
Much like the 2004–05 NHL lockout, the big issue was the implementation of a salary cap.

2004–05 NHL season

2004–052004–05 season2005
The 2004–05 NHL lockout was a labor lockout that resulted in the cancellation of the National Hockey League (NHL) season, which would have been its 88th season of play.
The loss of the 2004–05 season's games made the NHL the second North American professional sports league to lose an entire postseason of games because of a labor dispute, the first being the 1994-95 MLB strike, which occurred 10 years prior.

National Hockey League Players' Association

NHLPANHL Players' AssociationNational Hockey League Players Association
This was opposed by the NHL Players Association (NHLPA), the players' labor union, who proposed an alternative system of revenue sharing.
A decade later, in 2004–05, the owners locked out the players again, becoming the first professional sports league to cancel an entire season.

Gary Bettman

Gary Bettman’s
The NHL, led by Commissioner Gary Bettman, attempted to convince players to accept a salary structure linking player salaries to league revenues, guaranteeing the clubs what the league called cost certainty.
Bettman has also been a central figure of three labor stoppages, including the 2004–05 NHL lockout that saw the entire season canceled.

New York Rangers

NY RangersNYRRangers
Most sports commentators saw Bettman's plan as reasonable, but some critics pointed out that a hard salary cap without any revenue sharing was an attempt to gain the support of the big market teams, such as Toronto, Montreal, Detroit, the New York Rangers, Vancouver, and Philadelphia, teams that did not support Bettman during the 1994–95 lockout.
They endured a franchise-record seven-year postseason drought from 1998 to 2005, and languished for the majority of the 2000s before enjoying another period of prosperity after the 2004–05 NHL Lockout.

Edmonton Oilers

EdmontonEDMAlberta Oilers
Some small-market teams, such as the Pittsburgh Penguins and the remaining small-market Canadian teams, were actually hoping for a lockout, since those teams would make more money by losing a season, with the Edmonton Oilers even publicly announcing that they would fold outright if there wasn't a lockout.
However, the Oilers began to struggle greatly shortly after the 2004–05 NHL lockout, having missed the playoffs every year since 2006, with the exception of 2016–17.

2005 NHL Entry Draft

20052005 Draft2005 NHL Draft
The loss of the 2004–05 season meant that there were no results on which to base the order of the 2005 NHL Entry Draft.
Originally scheduled to be held on 25 June, the 2004–05 NHL lockout led to the draft being postponed to 30 July.

Salary cap

NFL salary capcap spacewage cap
The main dispute was the league's desire to implement a salary cap to limit expenditure on player salaries. These concepts are believed to have ranged from a hard, or inflexible, salary cap similar to the one used in the National Football League, to a soft salary cap with some capped exceptions like the one used in the National Basketball Association, to a centralized salary negotiation system similar to that used in the Arena Football League and Major League Soccer.
Prior to the resolution of the 2004–05 lockout, the NHL was the only major North American professional sports league that had no luxury tax, very limited revenue sharing and no salary cap.

Wayne Gretzky

GretzkyW. GretzkyWayne
Two days after the cancellation announcement, The Hockey News reported that a deal with a $45 million cap had been reached "in principle" with the help of owners and former players Wayne Gretzky and Mario Lemieux.
In 2000, he became part-owner of the Phoenix Coyotes, and following the 2004–05 NHL lock-out, he became the team's head coach.

NHL commissioner

CommissionerNHL presidentPresident
The NHL, led by Commissioner Gary Bettman, attempted to convince players to accept a salary structure linking player salaries to league revenues, guaranteeing the clubs what the league called cost certainty.
As a result, on September 15, 2004, Bettman announced that the owners again locked the players out prior to the start of the 2004–05 season.

Trevor Linden

Linden, TrevorLinden''', ''TrevorTrevor
The NHLPA was represented by President Trevor Linden, Senior Director Ted Saskin, and associate counsel Ian Pulver.
As President, he played an instrumental role in the 2004–05 NHL lockout, including negotiations with league owners.

Arena Football League

AFLArena Football 1Arena Football
These concepts are believed to have ranged from a hard, or inflexible, salary cap similar to the one used in the National Football League, to a soft salary cap with some capped exceptions like the one used in the National Basketball Association, to a centralized salary negotiation system similar to that used in the Arena Football League and Major League Soccer.
In doing so, the AFL became the second sports league to cancel an entire season, after the National Hockey League cancelled the 2004–05 season because of a lockout.

Bobby Holík

Bobby HolikHolik, Bobby
One example was the 2002 Bobby Holik contract in which the New York Rangers signed him to five years for $45 million.
In 2005, following the 2004–05 NHL lockout, the Rangers bought-out the remainder of Holík's contract, after which he signed with the Atlanta Thrashers.

Lockout (industry)

lockoutlocked outlock-out
The 2004–05 NHL lockout was a labor lockout that resulted in the cancellation of the National Hockey League (NHL) season, which would have been its 88th season of play.
Recent notable lockout incidents have been reported in professional sports, notably involving Major League Baseball in the 1990 offseason, the National Basketball Association in the 1995 offseason, the 1996 offseason, and the 1998–99 and 2011–12 seasons, the National Hockey League in the 1994–95, 2004–05 and 2012–13 seasons, and the National Football League in the 2011 offseason.

Washington Capitals

WashingtonWSHWAS
Other franchises had held "fire sales" of franchise players, such as the Washington Capitals.
During the NHL labor dispute of 2004–05, which cost the NHL its entire season, Ovechkin stayed in Russia, playing for Dynamo Moscow.

Detroit Red Wings

DetroitDetroit CougarsDET
Most sports commentators saw Bettman's plan as reasonable, but some critics pointed out that a hard salary cap without any revenue sharing was an attempt to gain the support of the big market teams, such as Toronto, Montreal, Detroit, the New York Rangers, Vancouver, and Philadelphia, teams that did not support Bettman during the 1994–95 lockout.
The Red Wings did not play in the 2004–05 season due to the lockout, which cancelled the entire NHL season.

Sidney Crosby

Troy CrosbyCrosbyCrosby, Sidney
The league settled on a lottery system in which all teams had a weighted chance at the first pick, expected to be Sidney Crosby.
Due to the labour lockout that suspended the entire 2004–05 NHL season, positioning for the 2005 draft was conducted via a weighted lottery based on each team's playoff appearances and draft lottery victories in the last four years.

Daniel Sedin

DanielSedinD. Sedin
Also returning to Modo along with Forsberg were Canucks teammates Daniel Sedin, Henrik Sedin, and Markus Näslund, all of whom were originally drafted from Modo, while still others joined other Elitserien sides.
He played four seasons with Modo (including a return in 2004–05 due to the NHL lockout), helping the club to two consecutive appearances in the Le Mat Trophy Finals, in 1999 and 2000, where they lost both times.

SC Bern

BernBern U20
Swiss Nationalliga A had its own NHL stars when Canadians Joe Thornton and Rick Nash signed with HC Davos, Danny Brière and Dany Heatley signed with SC Bern of the Swiss league.
During the 2004–05 NHL lockout, Daniel Brière, Dany Heatley, J. P. Dumont, Marc Savard, Henrik Tallinder, and Chris Clark played for SC Bern.

Toronto Maple Leafs

TorontoTORMaple Leafs
Most sports commentators saw Bettman's plan as reasonable, but some critics pointed out that a hard salary cap without any revenue sharing was an attempt to gain the support of the big market teams, such as Toronto, Montreal, Detroit, the New York Rangers, Vancouver, and Philadelphia, teams that did not support Bettman during the 1994–95 lockout.
Following the 2004–05 NHL lockout, the Maple Leafs experienced their longest playoff drought in the club's history.

Alexei Morozov

Aleksey MorozovAleksei Morozov
Russian Superleague (now KHL) team AK Bars Kazan signed 11 NHL players, including Ilya Kovalchuk, Aleksey Morozov, and Vincent Lecavalier while Pavel Datsyuk played for HC Dynamo Moscow, Patrik Elias played for Czech HC JME Znojemští Orli and Russian Metallurg Magnitogorsk, and Czech superstar Jaromir Jagr played for HC Kladno and then Avangard Omsk.
During the 2004–05 NHL lockout, Morozov went back to Russia to hone his skills and play for the Ak Bars Kazan of the Russian Superleague (RSL), for whom he has played since.

Pittsburgh Penguins

PittsburghPITPenguins
Some small-market teams, such as the Pittsburgh Penguins and the remaining small-market Canadian teams, were actually hoping for a lockout, since those teams would make more money by losing a season, with the Edmonton Oilers even publicly announcing that they would fold outright if there wasn't a lockout.
The 2004–05 NHL season was canceled due to a lockout.