2005 New Zealand general election

2005 election20052005 general election2005 electionsgeneral election17 September 20052005 general elections2005 election result2005 Labour Party list2005 New Zealand election
The 2005 New Zealand general election on Saturday 17 September 2005 determined the membership of the 48th New Zealand Parliament.wikipedia
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48th New Zealand Parliament

48th Parliament48th2005 Parliament
The 2005 New Zealand general election on Saturday 17 September 2005 determined the membership of the 48th New Zealand Parliament.
Its composition was determined at a general election held on 17 September 2005.

Don Brash

Brash, DonDonald BrashDr Donald Brash
No party won a majority, but the Labour Party of Prime Minister Helen Clark secured two more seats than nearest rival, the National Party of Dr Don Brash.
At the New Zealand general election on 17 September 2005, National under Brash's leadership made major gains and achieved what was at the time the party's best result since the institution of the mixed-member proportional electoral system in 1993, compared with their worst result ever in 2002 under the leadership of his predecessor, Bill English.

Māori Party

MāoriMaori Party Māori
With the exception of the newly formed Māori Party, which took four Māori seats from Labour, most of the other parties polled lower than in the previous election, losing votes and seats.
The party won four Māori seats in the 2005 election and went into Opposition.

United Future

United Future New ZealandUnited Future Party United Future
On 17 October, Clark announced a new coalition agreement that saw the return of her minority government coalition with the Progressive Party, with confidence and supply support from New Zealand First and from United Future.
The party won eight seats in 2002; however it was reduced to three Members of Parliament in 2005.

Gallagher index

Gallagher index of dis-proportionalitydisproportionalityGallagher index of disproportionality
The results of the election give a Gallagher index of disproportionality of 1.11.
This table uses the New Zealand 2005 election result.

Maryan Street

Street, Maryan
In the 2005 election, she became the first openly lesbian MP elected to the New Zealand Parliament.

Sue Moroney

Moroney, Sue
She is a member of the New Zealand Labour Party and was a Member of Parliament from 2005 general election until her retirement in 2017.

Overhang seat

overhangoverhang seatsexcess mandates
One hundred and twenty-one MPs were elected to the New Zealand House of Representatives: 69 from single-member electorates, including one overhang seat, and 52 from party lists (one extra due to the overhang). With four electorate seats, the election night overhang of two seats was reduced to one, and as National had the 120th seat allocated under the party vote, National lost one list seat (that of Katrina Shanks) that they appeared to have won on election night.
In New Zealand, the Māori Party won one overhang seat in 2005 and 2011, and two overhang seats in 2008.

New Zealand First

NZ FirstNew Zealand First Party NZ First
On 17 October, Clark announced a new coalition agreement that saw the return of her minority government coalition with the Progressive Party, with confidence and supply support from New Zealand First and from United Future.
It did not stand candidates in the Māori electorates in the 2002, 2005, or 2008 general elections.

Shane Jones

Provincial Growth FundHon Shane JonesJones, Shane
He stood in the 2005 election for the Labour Party, being ranked twenty-seventh on its party list.

Katrina Shanks

Shanks, Katrina
With four electorate seats, the election night overhang of two seats was reduced to one, and as National had the 120th seat allocated under the party vote, National lost one list seat (that of Katrina Shanks) that they appeared to have won on election night.
Shanks sought the National party's nomination as their candidate for the Ohariu-Belmont electorate at the 2005 general election in 2004.

Michael Wood (New Zealand politician)

Michael WoodWood, Michael
Wood stood in Pakuranga during the 2002 and 2005 elections and was on the Labour Party list in 2008.

New Zealand National Party

National PartyNationalThe National Party
No party won a majority, but the Labour Party of Prime Minister Helen Clark secured two more seats than nearest rival, the National Party of Dr Don Brash.
Strong campaigning on a tax-cuts theme in the lead-up to the 2005 election, together with a consolidation of centre-right support, may have contributed to the National Party's winning 48 out of 121 seats in Parliament.

Winston Peters

Rt Hon Winston PetersPeters, Winston Winston Peters
New Zealand First parliamentary leader Winston Peters and United Future parliamentary leader Peter Dunne became ministers of the Crown outside Cabinet, Peters as Minister of Foreign Affairs and Dunne as Minister of Revenue.
As the 2005 general election approached, Peters did not indicate a preference for coalition with either of the major parties, declaring that he would not seek the "baubles of office".

Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand

Green PartyGreensGreen
The Green Party which had supported Labour before the election received no cabinet post (see below), but gained several concessions from the coalition on matters such as energy and transport, and agreed to support the government on matters of confidence and supply.
In the 2005 election, the Greens won 5.30%, returning six of their MPs to Parliament.

Peter Dunne

Dunne, PeterPeter Francis Dunne
New Zealand First parliamentary leader Winston Peters and United Future parliamentary leader Peter Dunne became ministers of the Crown outside Cabinet, Peters as Minister of Foreign Affairs and Dunne as Minister of Revenue.
Dunne retained his seat in the 2005 general election but his party's proportion of the nationwide vote diminished considerably, with a corresponding loss of seats in Parliament.

Helen Clark

ClarkClark, HelenHelen Elizabeth Clark
No party won a majority, but the Labour Party of Prime Minister Helen Clark secured two more seats than nearest rival, the National Party of Dr Don Brash.
In 2005, following the general election of that year, Labour and the Progressive Party renewed their coalition, with confidence and supply arrangements with both New Zealand First and United Future in exchange for giving the leaders of those parties ministerial positions outside Cabinet.

Kate Wilkinson (politician)

Kate WilkinsonCatherine "Kate" WilkinsonWilkinson, Kate
In the 2005 election, Wilkinson was a candidate for the National Party, standing in the Waimakariri electorate and ranked 38th on the party list.

Ann Hartley

Hartley, AnnMargaret Ann Hartley
Hartley served as the Deputy Speaker of the House in the 47th New Zealand Parliament and the Assistant Speaker from the 2005 general election until her retirement from national politics in February 2008.

Michael Cullen (politician)

Michael CullenDr Michael CullenMichael John Cullen
His term in the position ended following the 2005 general election.

Richard Worth

Worth, RichardDr Richard WorthRichard Westwood Worth
He lost his electorate seat in the 2005 election to the ACT New Zealand leader Rodney Hide.

New Zealand Labour Party

Labour PartyLabourLabour Government
No party won a majority, but the Labour Party of Prime Minister Helen Clark secured two more seats than nearest rival, the National Party of Dr Don Brash.

Nicky Wagner

Hon Nicky WagnerWagner, Nicky
She contested the Christchurch Central electorate for the National Party in the 2005 general election.