2011 New Zealand general election

2011 general election2011 election2011New Zealand general election, 2011November 2011 general election2011 election campaign2014 election26 November 2011 general electiongeneral election2011 election result
The 2011 New Zealand general election on Saturday 26 November 2011 determined the membership of the 50th New Zealand Parliament.wikipedia
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50th New Zealand Parliament

50th Parliament50th50th Parliament of New Zealand
The 2011 New Zealand general election on Saturday 26 November 2011 determined the membership of the 50th New Zealand Parliament.
The 50th New Zealand Parliament was elected at the 2011 general election.

New Zealand electorates

electorateNew Zealand electorateelectorates
One hundred and twenty-one MPs were elected to the New Zealand House of Representatives, 70 from single-member electorates, including one overhang seat, and 50 from party lists.
Starting from 2014 under the MMP electoral system, 71 of the usually 120 seats in Parliament were filled by electorate members, with the remainder being filled from party lists in order to achieve proportional representation (there were 69 electorates in 2005, and 70 electorates in the 2008 and 2011 elections).

2011 New Zealand voting system referendum

referendum on the voting system2011 voting system referendum2011 New Zealand voting method referendum
A referendum on the voting system was held at the same time as the election, with voters voting by majority to keep the MMP system.
It was held on Saturday 26 November 2011, in conjunction with the 2011 general election,

John Key

KeySir John KeyKey, John
The incumbent National Party, led by John Key, gained the plurality with 47.3% of the party vote and 59 seats, two seats short of holding a majority.
The National government went on to win two more general elections under his leadership: in November 2011 and September 2014.

Mana Movement

Mana PartyMana Mana
The Māori Party was reduced from five seats to three, as the party vote split between the Māori Party and former Māori Party MP Hone Harawira's Mana Party. Carter continued as an independent, while Harawira resigned from parliament to recontest his Te Tai Tokerau electorate in a by-election under his newly formed Mana Party.
Harawira won the by-election in Te Tai Tokerau of 25 June 2011 for the Mana Party and retained the seat during the 2011 general election, but lost it in 2014 and 2017 to Labour Party candidate Kelvin Davis.

New Zealand First

NZ FirstNew Zealand First Party NZ First
New Zealand First, having won no seats in 2008 due to its failure to either reach the 5% threshold or win an electorate, made a comeback with 6.6% of the vote entitling them to eight seats.
However, in the 2011 election, New Zealand First gained 6.59% of the total party vote, entitling it to eight members of parliament (MPs).

Fifth National Government of New Zealand

Fifth National GovernmentNational Governmentgovernment
Following the election, National reentered into confidence and supply agreements with ACT and United Future on 5 December 2011, and with the Māori Party on 11 December 2011, to form a minority government with a seven-seat majority (64 seats to 57) and give the Fifth National Government a second term in office.
It was subsequently reformed after the 2011 general election with a reduced number of seats, and after the 2014 general election with a reduced share of the party vote but the same number of seats.

ACT New Zealand

ACTACT PartyAssociation of Consumers and Taxpayers
ACT New Zealand won less than a third of the party vote it received in 2008, reducing from five seats to one.
ACT was briefly led by National Party leader and Reserve Bank Governor Don Brash for the 2011 general election, after which the party caucus was reduced to one seat.

Māori Party

MāoriMaori Party Māori
The Māori Party was reduced from five seats to three, as the party vote split between the Māori Party and former Māori Party MP Hone Harawira's Mana Party.
After the 2008, 2011 and 2014 elections, where the party won five, three and two Māori seats respectively, it supported a government led by the centre-right National Party, with the co-leaders being ministers outside cabinet.

United Future

United Future New ZealandUnited Future Party United Future
United Future lost party votes, but retained their one seat in Parliament.
Dunne was re-elected during both the 2011 and 2014 general elections.

Rodney Hide

Hide, RodneyMr HideRodney Philip Hide
He stepped down as ACT leader in April 2011 after a leadership challenge from Don Brash and retired from Parliament at the general election later that year.

Overhang seat

overhangoverhang seatsexcess mandates
One hundred and twenty-one MPs were elected to the New Zealand House of Representatives, 70 from single-member electorates, including one overhang seat, and 50 from party lists.
In New Zealand, the Māori Party won one overhang seat in 2005 and 2011, and two overhang seats in 2008.

Christchurch Central

Christchurch Central electorateLocal electorate
The Christchurch Central electorate, for example, has 33 polling stations in 2011 compared to 45 in 2008.
The electorate was established for the 1946 election and, until 2011 had always been won by the Labour Party.

Keith Locke

Locke, Keith
Keith James Locke (born 1944) is a former New Zealand member of parliament who represented the Green Party, being first elected to parliament in 1999 and retiring from parliament at the 2011 election.

Tāmaki (New Zealand electorate)

TamakiTāmakiTamaki electorate
One of the ACT MPs, John Boscawen, contested Tāmaki, but did not expect to win and was not on the party list. In Coromandel, North Shore, Northland, Rangitikei, Rodney and Tāmaki, the seats were passed from incumbent National MPs to new National MPs; in Epsom, the seat was passed from the incumbent ACT MP to the new ACT MP; and in Dunedin North and Manurewa, the seats were passed from incumbent Labour MPs to new Labour MPs.
The electorate is represented by Simon O'Connor, who became the National Party candidate after Allan Peachey withdrew from the 2011 election for health reasons; Peachey died before the election.

Te Tai Tokerau

Tai TokerauTaitokerauTe Tai Tokerau seat
Carter continued as an independent, while Harawira resigned from parliament to recontest his Te Tai Tokerau electorate in a by-election under his newly formed Mana Party.
He was returned under the Mana Party banner in July 2011 and confirmed at the November 2011 general election.

Rangitīkei (New Zealand electorate)

RangitikeiRangitīkeiRangitikei electorate
In Coromandel, North Shore, Northland, Rangitikei, Rodney and Tāmaki, the seats were passed from incumbent National MPs to new National MPs; in Epsom, the seat was passed from the incumbent ACT MP to the new ACT MP; and in Dunedin North and Manurewa, the seats were passed from incumbent Labour MPs to new Labour MPs.
He has held this position since 2011.

Phil Goff

Goff, PhilGoffH.E. Mr. Phil Goff
The opposing Labour Party, led by Phil Goff, lost ground winning 27.5% of the vote and 34 seats, while the Green Party won 11.1% of the vote and 14 seats – the biggest share of the party vote for a minor party since 1996.
On 26 November 2011 the results of the general election were very poor for Labour, which lost 6.86% of the list vote and 9 seats.

2011 Te Tai Tokerau by-election

A by-electionTe Tai TokerauTe Tai Tokerau by-election
Carter continued as an independent, while Harawira resigned from parliament to recontest his Te Tai Tokerau electorate in a by-election under his newly formed Mana Party.
Many politicians and political commentators criticised the by-election because it would occur so close to the 2011 New Zealand general election.

Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand

Green PartyGreensGreen
The opposing Labour Party, led by Phil Goff, lost ground winning 27.5% of the vote and 34 seats, while the Green Party won 11.1% of the vote and 14 seats – the biggest share of the party vote for a minor party since 1996. Labour, Greens and the Progressives are all in opposition, although only the Labour and Progressive parties formally constitute the formal Opposition; the Greens have a minor agreement with the government but are not committed to confidence and supply support.
In the 2011 election, the Green Party received nearly a quarter of a million party votes (247,372), equating to 11.06% of the total valid party votes nationwide, earning them 14 seats in the new 50th Parliament.

Jim Anderton's Progressive Party

Progressive PartyProgressiveProgressives
Labour, Greens and the Progressives are all in opposition, although only the Labour and Progressive parties formally constitute the formal Opposition; the Greens have a minor agreement with the government but are not committed to confidence and supply support.
The party did not contest the 2011 general election and was deregistered at its own request in March 2012.

Kate Wilkinson (politician)

Kate WilkinsonCatherine "Kate" WilkinsonWilkinson, Kate
In the 2011 election Wilkinson overturned incumbent Clayton Cosgrove's 390 vote majority to win by 642 votes, as well as winning the party vote in the electorate by more than 12,000 votes.

New Zealand National Party

National PartyNationalThe National Party
The incumbent National Party, led by John Key, gained the plurality with 47.3% of the party vote and 59 seats, two seats short of holding a majority.
At the 26 November 2011 general election, National gained 47.31% of the party vote, the highest percentage gained by any political party since MMP was introduced, helped by a lower voter turnout and the misfortunes of its traditional support parties.