2011 United Kingdom census

Front page of the 2011 census form.
An advert in Cornwall telling people how to describe their ethnicity and national identity as Cornish.
The ethnic group question used in the 2011 census in Scotland.

Taken every ten years.

- 2011 United Kingdom census

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Members of the Asian community with the then prime minister David Cameron in 2014

British Asian

Asians in the United Kingdom (also referred to as Asian Britons and British Asians) are a multi-ethnic group of UK residents who, regardless of citizenship status, identify as and are perceived to be Asian people.

Asians in the United Kingdom (also referred to as Asian Britons and British Asians) are a multi-ethnic group of UK residents who, regardless of citizenship status, identify as and are perceived to be Asian people.

Members of the Asian community with the then prime minister David Cameron in 2014
British Asian professionals at a networking event in the City of London
The East London Mosque, is one of the largest mosques in Europe, and the biggest in the UK
Munshi I'tisam-ud-Din was the first South Asian to travel and live in Europe, and write about his experiences
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi who studied in England played a pivotal role in leading the Indian independence movement
Shahidul Alam was one of the persons of the year selected by Time magazine in 2018
ArcelorMittal Orbit, London Olympic Park, designated by the Indian Anish Kapoor
Mohammed Salim, the first South Asian footballer to play for a foreign club. Due to playing in bare feet, he is having them bandaged by Jimmy McMenemy in 1936.
Amir Khan (left), with American boxer Paulie Malignaggi (right)
Hammad Miah is a professional snooker player of Bengali origin.
Shazia Mirza is a popular British comedian
The award-winning dance act Signature involved a British Pakistani and a British Indian
An Asian business leader showcasing his awards at the Grange Hotel in London
British Asian musicians combining Eastern and Western musical traditions
The Asian Professional Awards from left to right: Onkardeep Singh MBE; Jasvir Singh OBE; Sunny & Shay Grewal; Harry Virdee; Param Singh MBE
A Shaheed Minar in Altab Ali Park, Whitechapel renamed in honour of the Bangladeshi racial victim Altab Ali

They constitute a significant and growing minority of the people living in the United Kingdom, with 6.9% of the population identifying as Asian / Asian British in the 2011 United Kingdom census.

Map of predominant national identity in the 2011 census in Northern Ireland. Stronger blue is more British. Stronger green is more Irish.

People of Northern Ireland

Demonym for all people born in Northern Ireland or people who are entitled to reside in Northern Ireland without any restriction on their period of residence.

Demonym for all people born in Northern Ireland or people who are entitled to reside in Northern Ireland without any restriction on their period of residence.

Map of predominant national identity in the 2011 census in Northern Ireland. Stronger blue is more British. Stronger green is more Irish.
Map of districts of Northern Ireland colour coded to show the predominant national identity. Stronger green indicates a higher proportion of people describing themselves as Irish. Stronger blue indicates a higher proportion of people describing themselves as British. Percentages show the difference between the proportion of people describing themselves as Irish and the proportion of people describing themselves as British. Data from 2011 census
Map of districts of Northern Ireland colour coded to show the predominant national identity amongst Catholics. Stronger green indicates a higher proportion of Catholics describing themselves as Irish. Blue indicates a higher proportion of Catholics describing themselves as British than as Irish. Percentages show the difference between the proportion of Catholics describing themselves as Irish and the proportion of Catholics describing themselves as British. Data from 2011 census

In the 2011 census, respondents gave their national identity as follows:

Place names in Scotland that contain the element bal- from the Scottish Gaelic baile meaning home, farmstead, town or city. These data give some indication of the extent of medieval Gaelic settlement in Scotland.

Scottish Gaelic

Goidelic language (in the Celtic branch of the Indo-European language family) native to the Gaels of Scotland.

Goidelic language (in the Celtic branch of the Indo-European language family) native to the Gaels of Scotland.

Place names in Scotland that contain the element bal- from the Scottish Gaelic baile meaning home, farmstead, town or city. These data give some indication of the extent of medieval Gaelic settlement in Scotland.
Cumbernauld Gaelic Choir in 2021
Anne Lorne Gillies speaking publicly in the Scottish Gaelic language
Police Scotland vehicle logo (Bilingual)
Bilingual Gaelic–English road sign in Scotland
Monolingual Gaelic direction sign, at Rodel (Roghadal) on Harris in the Outer Hebrides
Bilingual English/Gaelic sign at Queen Street Station in Glasgow
Antigonish, Nova Scotia
Sgoil Ghàidhlig Ghlaschu (Glasgow Gaelic School)
A sign indicating services in Gaelic and English at a Free Church of Scotland congregation in the community of Ness, Isle of Lewis
Gaelic public signage has become more common in the Scottish Highlands. This sign is located in the bilingual port community of Mallaig.

In the 2011 census of Scotland, 57,375 people (1.1% of the Scottish population aged over 3 years old) reported as able to speak Gaelic, 1,275 fewer than in 2001.

Statue of Robert Burns in Canberra, Australia

Scots language

Anglic language variety in the West Germanic language family, spoken in Scotland and parts of Ulster in the north of Ireland (where the local dialect is known as Ulster Scots).

Anglic language variety in the West Germanic language family, spoken in Scotland and parts of Ulster in the north of Ireland (where the local dialect is known as Ulster Scots).

Statue of Robert Burns in Canberra, Australia
Lufe God abufe al and yi nychtbour as yi self ("Love God above all and thy neighbour as thyself"), an example of Early Scots, on John Knox House, Edinburgh

In the 2011 Scottish Census, over 1.5 million people in Scotland reported being able to speak Scots.

Cornwall Council Electoral Divisions map as of May 2021

Cornwall Council

Unitary authority for Cornwall in the United Kingdom, not including the Isles of Scilly, which has its own unitary council.

Unitary authority for Cornwall in the United Kingdom, not including the Isles of Scilly, which has its own unitary council.

Cornwall Council Electoral Divisions map as of May 2021

The council took an active role in the promotion of the options for registering Cornish ethnicity and national identity on the 2011 UK Census.

The Union and Cornish flags.

Cornish people

Ethnic group native to, or associated with Cornwall and a recognised national minority in the United Kingdom, which can trace its roots to the ancient Britons who inhabited southern and central Great Britain before the Roman conquest.

Ethnic group native to, or associated with Cornwall and a recognised national minority in the United Kingdom, which can trace its roots to the ancient Britons who inhabited southern and central Great Britain before the Roman conquest.

The Union and Cornish flags.
A poster in Cornwall telling people how to describe their ethnicity and national identity as Cornish in the 2011 census
Mên-an-Tol is an ancient lith site in Cornwall
An 18th century map of Great Britain based on accounts from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, showing "Cornweallas"
European nations in AD 998
The Cornish language experienced a shift between 1300 and 1750, with the Cornish people gradually adopting English as their common language.
The National Tartan of Cornwall. Cornish kilts and tartans are emblematic of a resurgent, pan-Celtic Cornish identity developed during Cornwall's Celtic Revival.
Cornish miners in the mid-19th century. A demise in mining in Cornwall prompted an exodus of Cornish miners and families resulting in a displaced Cornish diaspora.
William "Harold" Oliver was the son of Australian Cornish immigrants who lived in the mining town of Waukaringa. Harold Oliver was a three time national champion with the Port Adelaide Football Club in 1910, 1913 and 1914.
A silver mining museum in Mineral del Monte, a remnant of the Cornish migration to Mexico during the early-19th century.
St. Piran's Day is an annual patronal Cornish festival celebrating Cornish culture and history every 5 March.
A welcome sign to Penzance, in the English and Cornish languages
The 'Obby 'Oss festival is a Cornish May Day festival celebrated in Padstow.
A Cornish pasty
Cornish wrestling is a contact sport, a style of folk martial arts, that has its origins in Cornwall
The surviving part of the former Duchy Palace in Lostwithiel, the former administrative seat of the Duke of Cornwall from c.1265 to 1874.
The Old County Hall in Truro, the former seat of Cornwall Council.

The Cornish self-government movement has called for greater recognition of Cornish culture, politics, and language, and urged that Cornish people be accorded greater status, exemplified by the call for them to be one of the listed ethnic groups in the United Kingdom Census 2011 form.

The traditional counties of Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland

Part of the United Kingdom that is variously described as a country, province, territory or region.

Part of the United Kingdom that is variously described as a country, province, territory or region.

The traditional counties of Northern Ireland
Cannon on the Derry city walls
Scrabo Tower, County Down
Signing of the Ulster Covenant in 1912 in opposition to Home Rule
Result of the 1918 general election in Ireland
Crowds in Belfast for the state opening of the Northern Ireland Parliament on 22 June 1921
The Coat of arms of Northern Ireland used between 1924 and 1973
James Craig (centre) with members of the first government of Northern Ireland
Opening of the Northern Ireland parliament buildings (Stormont) in 1932
Responsibility for Troubles-related deaths between 1969 and 2001
First Minister Ian Paisley (DUP) centre, and deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness (Sinn Féin) left, and Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond right in 2008
A flowchart illustrating all the political parties that have existed throughout the history of Northern Ireland and leading up to its formation (covering 1889 to 2020).
Parliament Buildings at Stormont, Belfast, seat of the assembly
Unionist mural in Belfast
ESA Sentinel-2 image of Northern Ireland
Köppen climate types of Northern Ireland
Lough Neagh
Hare's Gap, Mourne Mountains
The Giant's Causeway, County Antrim
Marble Arch Caves
Goliath crane of Harland & Wolff in Belfast
An NIR C3K railcar
2011 census: differences in proportions of those who are, or were brought up, either Catholic or Protestant/Other Christians
Map of predominant national identity in the 2011 census
Map of most commonly held passport
Approximate boundaries of the current and historical English/Scots dialects in Ulster. South to north, the colour bands represent Hiberno-English, South-Ulster English, Mid-Ulster English and the three traditional Ulster Scots areas. The Irish-speaking Gaeltacht is not shown.
Percentage of people aged 3+ claiming to have some ability in Irish in the 2011 census
Percentage of people aged 3+ claiming to have some ability in Ulster Scots in the 2011 census
An Orange march
The logo for the Northern Ireland assembly is based on the flower of the flax plant.
People carrying the Irish flag, overlooking those with the unionist Ulster Banner
George Best, Northern Irish international footballer and 1968 Ballon d'Or
Peter Canavan, Tyrone captain 2003
Prominent Northern Irish golfer Rory McIlroy
Queen's University Belfast
Broadcasting House, Belfast, home of BBC Northern Ireland

In 2011, its population was 1,810,863, constituting about 30% of the island's population and about 3% of the UK's population.

London Borough of Newham

London borough created in 1965 by the London Government Act 1963.

London borough created in 1965 by the London Government Act 1963.

A map showing the wards of Newham since 2002
Newham Town Hall in East Ham (E6)
Green Street where the population is predominantly South Asian
Building 1000 – Newham Council Headquarters
London City Airport is in Newham

Newham has the youngest overall population and one of the lowest indigenous White British populations in the country according to the 2011 UK Census.

White British proportion of the population from 2001 to 2011

White British

Ethnicity classification used for indigenous white British , Irish/Northern Irish and Gypsy/Irish Travellers or "other" white, immigrant groups used in the 2011 United Kingdom Census.

Ethnicity classification used for indigenous white British , Irish/Northern Irish and Gypsy/Irish Travellers or "other" white, immigrant groups used in the 2011 United Kingdom Census.

White British proportion of the population from 2001 to 2011
alt=|West Yorkshire
alt=|West Midlands

According to the 2011 UK Census, White British are 64% Christian in England and Wales, mostly Anglican in England, while the percentage for all groups is about 59%.

Shen Fu-Tsung was the first ever recorded ethnic Chinese person to set foot in what is now the United Kingdom, having visited over 300 years ago in 1685

British Chinese

British Chinese (also known as Chinese British or Chinese Britons) are people of Chinese – particularly Han Chinese – ancestry who reside in the United Kingdom, constituting the second-largest group of overseas Chinese in Western Europe after France.

British Chinese (also known as Chinese British or Chinese Britons) are people of Chinese – particularly Han Chinese – ancestry who reside in the United Kingdom, constituting the second-largest group of overseas Chinese in Western Europe after France.

Shen Fu-Tsung was the first ever recorded ethnic Chinese person to set foot in what is now the United Kingdom, having visited over 300 years ago in 1685
A woman holds a child in Limehouse, East London, 1920s.
A Chinese language poster calling for a meeting with a visiting Ph.D Dr. Pan who was there to build an ancestral hall and reconnect with Shanghai. Limehouse, London, 1924.
Chinese Gospel Church in Liverpool.
A temple of the True Awakening Tradition of Buddhism in the London Borough of Brent.
Chinatown in Birmingham
Chinese population in London (2011 Census)
Denver House Bounds Green
Charing Cross Library
Chinese merchant seamen memorial, Liverpool's Pier Head

In the 2011 census, the question for ethnic group allowed for the option of "Chinese" for England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, and "Chinese, Chinese Scottish or Chinese British" for Scotland.