2011 Wisconsin protestswikipedia
The 2011 Wisconsin protests were a series of demonstrations in the state of Wisconsin in the United States beginning in February involving at its zenith as many as 100,000 protesters opposing the 2011 Wisconsin Act 10, also called the "Wisconsin Budget Repair bill." Subsequently, anti-tax activists and other conservatives, including Tea Party advocates, launched small pockets of counter protests.
2011 Wisconsin protests2011 Wisconsin budget protestsprotestsespecially in Wisconsinseries of major protestsWisconsin labor protestscollective bargaining disputelarge proteststhe protestsprotests continued

2011 Wisconsin Act 10

2011 Wisconsin Act 10Wisconsin budget repair billAct 10
The 2011 Wisconsin protests were a series of demonstrations in the state of Wisconsin in the United States beginning in February involving at its zenith as many as 100,000 protesters opposing the 2011 Wisconsin Act 10, also called the "Wisconsin Budget Repair bill." Subsequently, anti-tax activists and other conservatives, including Tea Party advocates, launched small pockets of counter protests.
In response, unions and other groups organized protests inside and around the state capitol.

Wisconsin Supreme Court election, 2011

Wisconsin Supreme Court election in 2011
The protests were a major driving force for recall elections of state senators in 2011 and 2012, the failed recall of Governor Scott Walker in 2012 and a contentious Wisconsin Supreme Court election in 2011.
Unlike past elections for the Wisconsin Supreme Court, the race between 12-year incumbent David Prosser, Jr. and challenger Assistant Attorney General JoAnne Kloppenburg gained significant nationwide publicity as it was widely seen as a referendum on Governor Scott Walker's proposed budget reforms in Wisconsin, and a part of the 2011 Wisconsin protests.

Wisconsin gubernatorial recall election

recall election20122012 recall election
The protests were a major driving force for recall elections of state senators in 2011 and 2012, the failed recall of Governor Scott Walker in 2012 and a contentious Wisconsin Supreme Court election in 2011.
After the contentious collective bargaining dispute, Walker's disapproval ratings varied between 50 and 51% while his approval ratings varied between 47% and 49% in 2011.

Scott Walker (politician)

Scott WalkerGovernor Scott WalkerWalker
The protests were a major driving force for recall elections of state senators in 2011 and 2012, the failed recall of Governor Scott Walker in 2012 and a contentious Wisconsin Supreme Court election in 2011.
The response to Walker's policies included protests at the Wisconsin State Capitol and an effort to recall Walker.

Wisconsin State Journal

The Madison School District denied a Wisconsin State Journal request to view the notes – with the teachers' names removed – under the state's open records law.
The staff of the Wisconsin State Journal were named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Reporting in 2012 for their coverage of the "27 days of around-the-clock protests" at the state Capitol during the 2011 Wisconsin protests.

Wisconsin

WIWisconsinState of Wisconsin
The 2011 Wisconsin protests were a series of demonstrations in the state of Wisconsin in the United States beginning in February involving at its zenith as many as 100,000 protesters opposing the 2011 Wisconsin Act 10, also called the "Wisconsin Budget Repair bill." Subsequently, anti-tax activists and other conservatives, including Tea Party advocates, launched small pockets of counter protests.
A series of major protests by union supporters took place that year in response to the changes, and Walker survived a recall election held the next year, becoming the first governor in United States history to do so. Walker enacted other bills promoting conservative governance, such as a right-to-work law, abortion restrictions, and legislation removing certain gun controls.

Teaching Assistants Association

On Monday, February 14, the University of Wisconsin–Madison's Teaching Assistants Association distributed "We ♥ UW: Don't Break My ♥" Valentine cards to the governor, as a means of protesting the bill's negative impacts on working conditions at the university.
The union's protest at the Wisconsin State Capitol building began the 2011 Wisconsin protests.

Gordon Hintz

On February 28, Democratic Representative Gordon Hintz formally apologized for threatening remarks made to Republican Representative Michelle Litjens on the Assembly floor following the vote.
During the 2011 Wisconsin budget protests on February 18, 2011, Hintz delivered an impassioned and widely commented on speech against Republican Governor Scott Walker's plan to strip public unions of collective bargaining rights.

The Beast (newspaper)

The BeastThe Buffalo BeastThe Beast'' (newspaper)
On February 23, Buffalo Beast editor Ian Murphy placed a prank telephone call to Walker claiming to be billionaire David Koch, one of Walker's largest corporate supporters.
On February 23, 2011, editor Ian Murphy placed a prank telephone call to Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin during the 2011 Wisconsin budget protests.

John Kasich

John KasichKasichJohn R. Kasich
During the 20-minute call, Walker discussed a method of getting the absent Senators to return, rejected placing agent provocateurs among the protesters, and that he spoke daily with like-minded Ohio Governor John Kasich.
SB 5 also "sparked numerous protests with thousands of union workers and other opponents descending on the Statehouse, mirroring similar demonstrations in Wisconsin and injecting Ohio into the national debate over Republican governors' attempts to curb public workers' collective bargaining rights."

Mary Lazich

Efforts to recall Glenn Grothman (R-20th District), Mary Lazich (R-28th District), Lena Taylor (D-4th District), Spencer Coggs (D-6th District), Fred Risser (D-Madison), Julie Lassa (D-Stevens Point) and Mark Miller (D-Monona) were unsuccessful.
Senator Lazich was the subject of a recall attempt as part of the 2011 Wisconsin protests due to her support of Governor Scott Walker's budget repair bill that repeals collective bargaining on benefits for public employees.

Madison, Wisconsin

MadisonMadison, WIMadison, Wisconsin
Efforts to recall Glenn Grothman (R-20th District), Mary Lazich (R-28th District), Lena Taylor (D-4th District), Spencer Coggs (D-6th District), Fred Risser (D-Madison), Julie Lassa (D-Stevens Point) and Mark Miller (D-Monona) were unsuccessful. The protests centered on the Wisconsin State Capitol in Madison, with satellite protests also occurring at other municipalities throughout the state.
In early 2011, Madison was the site for large protests against a bill proposed by Governor Scott Walker that abolished almost all collective bargaining for public worker unions.

The Progressive

Progressivethe ProgressiveLa Follette's Weekly Magazine
Matthew Rothschild, editor of The Progressive magazine said "People see that Walker won everything big that he asked for, and despite all the great activism, we don't have anything to show for it. The mass protests that I expected this week at the Capitol in Madison did not materialize."
Located a few blocks from the Wisconsin State Capitol, The Progressive covered the protests that began in February 2011 in response to Governor Scott Walker's Wisconsin budget repair bill.

Dale Schultz

On February 27, it was reported by the media that Republican State Senator Dale Schultz would not vote for the bill.
In 2011, Schultz was the only Senate Republican to vote against the Wisconsin budget repair bill which sparked the 2011 Wisconsin protests.

Use of social media in the Wisconsin protests

An example of this is the use of social media in the 2011 Wisconsin protests over public unions that have occurred during February and March 2011.

Quorum

quorumquoratedelay the division
With only 19 Republican members, the Senate would not have the 20 Senators required for a quorum in order to vote on the bill, since it is a fiscal bill.
During the 2011 Wisconsin protests, fourteen Democratic members of the Wisconsin Senate went to Illinois in order to bust the necessary 20-member quorum.

Tom Barrett (Wisconsin politician)

Tom BarrettThomas M. BarrettMayor Barrett
Both Governor Walker and his opponent in the 2010 Governor's race, Tom Barrett, stated that they would not close the budget deficit by taking money from the transportation fund.
In a survey of 768 Wisconsin voters conducted between February 24–27, 2011, during the 2011 Wisconsin budget protests, a poll by Public Policy Polling found that 52% of respondents said they would vote for Barrett if the election had been held then, while 45% said they would vote for Walker.

Overpass Light Brigade

The artwork is an episodic performance originally created as part of the 2011 Wisconsin protests to raise awareness about the campaign to recall Governor Scott Walker.

JoAnne Kloppenburg

The state supreme court race between 12-year incumbent David Prosser, Jr. and challenger Assistant Attorney General JoAnne Kloppenburg was widely seen as a referendum on Governor Walker's proposed budget reforms in Wisconsin, with labor organizations and tea party groups explicitly making the connection while Governor Walker himself stating it was not.
Although the election was ostensibly nonpartisan, the race between Prosser (a Republican) and Kloppenburg (a Democrat) received considerable partisan attention due to the 2011 Wisconsin protests regarding the budget repair bill, which was considered likely to come before the Wisconsin Supreme Court, as well as several controversies regarding the incumbent.

Luther Olsen

Luther S. Olsen
Olsen was the target of an active recall effort as part of the 2011 Wisconsin protests.

Mitch Daniels

Governor Mitch DanielsMitchell E. Daniels Jr.Mitchell E. Daniels
Walker cited Governor Mitch Daniels as an example for his own budget repair when they repealed collective bargaining in Indiana in 2005, and claims it helped government become more efficient and responsive.
Daniels was interviewed in February 2011 about the similar 2011 Wisconsin budget protests in Madison.

Twitter

tweetedtweettweets
One man tweeted that he prayed an anvil would fall from the sky onto Walker.
For example, it has been used to organize protests, sometimes referred to as "Twitter Revolutions", which include April 2009 Moldovan parliamentary election protests, 2009 student protests in Austria, 2009 Gaza–Israel conflict, 2009 Iran green revolution, 2009 Toronto G20, 2010 Bolivarian Revolution, 2010 Germany Stuttgart21, 2011 Egypt Revolution, 2011 England riots, 2011 United States Occupy movement, 2011 Anti-austerity movement in Spain, 2011 Greece Aganaktismenoi movements, 2011 Italy Rome demonstration, 2011 Wisconsin labor protests, 2012 Gaza–Israel conflict, 2013 protests in Brazil, 2013 Gezi Park protests.

Dan Kapanke

On August 9, the Republicans won enough seats to keep control of the Wisconsin Senate, despite losing Randy Hopper's and Dan Kapanke's seats, bringing the largest group of simultaneous recall elections in United States history to a close.
Kapanke was subject to an active recall effort to remove him from his seat in the Wisconsin Senate, as part of the 2011 Wisconsin protests.

William Cronon

Cronan, WilliamCronon, William
On March 21, Professor William Cronon of the University of Wisconsin wrote an op-ed opposing the bill.
During the 2011 Wisconsin protests over the state budget, Cronon started a blog called "Scholar as Citizen."