2013 Colorado floods

Boulder Creek flash floods2013 floodsfloodingFloodsmajor flood disruptionmajor flooding in 2013massive floodingSeptember 2013 floodSeptember 9, 2013
The 2013 Colorado floods were a series of natural disasters occurring in the U.S. state of Colorado.wikipedia
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Colorado

COState of ColoradoColorado, USA
The 2013 Colorado floods were a series of natural disasters occurring in the U.S. state of Colorado.
Notable examples include the 1965 Denver Flood, the Big Thompson River flooding of 1976 and the 2013 Colorado floods.

Boulder High School

BoulderBoulder (CO)Boulder High School,
This caused serious damage to buildings along the creek and the creek path such as Boulder High School.
The 2013 Colorado floods caused the school to be closed for several days.

Jamestown, Colorado

JamestownTown of JamestownTown of '''Jamestown
Rainfall over five days in Boulder County exceeded the county's annual average. Three deaths have been confirmed in Boulder County. Over 1,600 were evacuated, with 262 homes destroyed and nearly 300 more damaged. Nearly 900 sqmi were damaged by flooding. Roads suffered extensive damage in Big Thompson Canyon and Buckhorn Canyon, with some sections completely washed away. Maps of the flooding are available on the Boulder County Government website. Jamestown experienced losses of 20% of homes and 50% of roads, with one fatality reported.
Jamestown was hit hard by the September 2013 Colorado floods when the town was isolated due to road damage from the rains and the flooding of James Creek.

Broomfield, Colorado

BroomfieldCity and County of BroomfieldCity and County of Broomfield, Colorado
Governor John Hickenlooper declared a disaster emergency on September 12, 2013, in 14 counties: Adams, Arapahoe, Broomfield, Boulder, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan, Pueblo, Washington and Weld.
2013 Colorado floods

Boulder County, Colorado

Boulder CountyBoulderCounty
Rainfall over five days in Boulder County exceeded the county's annual average. Three deaths have been confirmed in Boulder County. Over 1,600 were evacuated, with 262 homes destroyed and nearly 300 more damaged. Nearly 900 sqmi were damaged by flooding. Roads suffered extensive damage in Big Thompson Canyon and Buckhorn Canyon, with some sections completely washed away. Maps of the flooding are available on the Boulder County Government website. Jamestown experienced losses of 20% of homes and 50% of roads, with one fatality reported. The situation intensified on September 11 and 12. Boulder County was worst hit, with 9.08 in recorded September 12 and up to 17 in of rain recorded by September 15, which is comparable to Boulder County's average annual precipitation (20.7 inches, 525 mm).
2013 Colorado floods

Boulder, Colorado

BoulderBoulder, COCity of Boulder
Governor John Hickenlooper declared a disaster emergency on September 12, 2013, in 14 counties: Adams, Arapahoe, Broomfield, Boulder, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan, Pueblo, Washington and Weld.
2013 Colorado floods

Lyons, Colorado

LyonsLyons, COTown of Lyons
The town of Lyons in Boulder County was isolated by the flooding of St. Vrain Creek, and several earth dams along the Front Range burst or were over-topped.
2013 Colorado floods

Glen Haven, Colorado

Glen Haven
Larimer County was also hit hard, with 1120 sqmi affected by flooding, and 1,500 homes and 200 businesses destroyed. An additional 4,500 homes and 500 businesses were estimated to be damaged. Extensive road damage in Big Thompson Canyon cut off road access to the communities of Drake, Glen Haven, and Cedar Park. Three dams also failed in the county. Both U.S. Highway 36 and U.S. Highway 34, the major routes into the tourist town of Estes Park, were severely damaged. Hundreds of Estes Park residents were also isolated by the destruction of sections of Fish Creek Road and all nine crossings across Fish Creek. Damaged sewer lines dumped raw sewage down the creek and into the Big Thompson River.
In September 2013, approximately 80 percent of Glen Haven's downtown was destroyed in the 2013 Colorado floods.

Big Thompson River

Big ThompsonBig Thompson River floodBig Thompson Canyon
Rainfall over five days in Boulder County exceeded the county's annual average. Three deaths have been confirmed in Boulder County. Over 1,600 were evacuated, with 262 homes destroyed and nearly 300 more damaged. Nearly 900 sqmi were damaged by flooding. Roads suffered extensive damage in Big Thompson Canyon and Buckhorn Canyon, with some sections completely washed away. Maps of the flooding are available on the Boulder County Government website. Jamestown experienced losses of 20% of homes and 50% of roads, with one fatality reported. Larimer County was also hit hard, with 1120 sqmi affected by flooding, and 1,500 homes and 200 businesses destroyed. An additional 4,500 homes and 500 businesses were estimated to be damaged. Extensive road damage in Big Thompson Canyon cut off road access to the communities of Drake, Glen Haven, and Cedar Park. Three dams also failed in the county. Both U.S. Highway 36 and U.S. Highway 34, the major routes into the tourist town of Estes Park, were severely damaged. Hundreds of Estes Park residents were also isolated by the destruction of sections of Fish Creek Road and all nine crossings across Fish Creek. Damaged sewer lines dumped raw sewage down the creek and into the Big Thompson River. The Big Thompson River begins around Estes Park in northern Colorado and flows east through the state into Big Thompson Canyon.
The canyon was just one of the many areas along the Front Range that were devastated in the September 2013 flood.

Federal Emergency Management Agency

FEMAFederal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)Chairman
The state of Colorado began paying the National Guard for continuing relief efforts until the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) could reimburse the State government at the end of the shutdown.
An example of NRCC activity is the coordination of emergency management activities that took place in connection with the 2013 Colorado floods.

U.S. Route 36 in Colorado

U.S. Highway 36US 36U.S. Route 36
Larimer County was also hit hard, with 1120 sqmi affected by flooding, and 1,500 homes and 200 businesses destroyed. An additional 4,500 homes and 500 businesses were estimated to be damaged. Extensive road damage in Big Thompson Canyon cut off road access to the communities of Drake, Glen Haven, and Cedar Park. Three dams also failed in the county. Both U.S. Highway 36 and U.S. Highway 34, the major routes into the tourist town of Estes Park, were severely damaged. Hundreds of Estes Park residents were also isolated by the destruction of sections of Fish Creek Road and all nine crossings across Fish Creek. Damaged sewer lines dumped raw sewage down the creek and into the Big Thompson River.
In early September 2013, a 31-mile section of US 36 from Estes Park to Boulder was closed due to damage from the 2013 Colorado floods.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
The 2013 Colorado floods were a series of natural disasters occurring in the U.S. state of Colorado.

Cold front

cold frontscoldfrontal
Starting on September 9, 2013, a slow-moving cold front stalled over Colorado, clashing with warm humid monsoonal air from the south.

Front Range

Colorado Front RangeFront Ragefront range of the Rockies
This resulted in heavy rain and catastrophic flooding along Colorado's Front Range from Colorado Springs north to Fort Collins.

Colorado Springs, Colorado

Colorado SpringsColorado Springs, COCity of Colorado Springs
This resulted in heavy rain and catastrophic flooding along Colorado's Front Range from Colorado Springs north to Fort Collins.

Fort Collins, Colorado

Fort CollinsFort Collins, COFt. Collins
This resulted in heavy rain and catastrophic flooding along Colorado's Front Range from Colorado Springs north to Fort Collins.

John Hickenlooper

HickenlooperGovernor John HickenlooperColorado Governor John Hickenlooper
Governor John Hickenlooper declared a disaster emergency on September 12, 2013, in 14 counties: Adams, Arapahoe, Broomfield, Boulder, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan, Pueblo, Washington and Weld.

Adams County, Colorado

Adams CountyAdamsAdams counties
Governor John Hickenlooper declared a disaster emergency on September 12, 2013, in 14 counties: Adams, Arapahoe, Broomfield, Boulder, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan, Pueblo, Washington and Weld.

Arapahoe County, Colorado

Arapahoe CountyArapahoeArapahoe counties
Governor John Hickenlooper declared a disaster emergency on September 12, 2013, in 14 counties: Adams, Arapahoe, Broomfield, Boulder, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan, Pueblo, Washington and Weld.

El Paso County, Colorado

El Paso CountyEl PasoColorado
Governor John Hickenlooper declared a disaster emergency on September 12, 2013, in 14 counties: Adams, Arapahoe, Broomfield, Boulder, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan, Pueblo, Washington and Weld.

Fremont County, Colorado

Fremont CountyFremontColorado
Governor John Hickenlooper declared a disaster emergency on September 12, 2013, in 14 counties: Adams, Arapahoe, Broomfield, Boulder, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan, Pueblo, Washington and Weld.

Jefferson County, Colorado

Jefferson CountyJeffersonJefferson counties
Governor John Hickenlooper declared a disaster emergency on September 12, 2013, in 14 counties: Adams, Arapahoe, Broomfield, Boulder, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan, Pueblo, Washington and Weld.

Larimer County, Colorado

Larimer CountyLarimerLarimer counties
Governor John Hickenlooper declared a disaster emergency on September 12, 2013, in 14 counties: Adams, Arapahoe, Broomfield, Boulder, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan, Pueblo, Washington and Weld. Larimer County was also hit hard, with 1120 sqmi affected by flooding, and 1,500 homes and 200 businesses destroyed. An additional 4,500 homes and 500 businesses were estimated to be damaged. Extensive road damage in Big Thompson Canyon cut off road access to the communities of Drake, Glen Haven, and Cedar Park. Three dams also failed in the county. Both U.S. Highway 36 and U.S. Highway 34, the major routes into the tourist town of Estes Park, were severely damaged. Hundreds of Estes Park residents were also isolated by the destruction of sections of Fish Creek Road and all nine crossings across Fish Creek. Damaged sewer lines dumped raw sewage down the creek and into the Big Thompson River.

Logan County, Colorado

Logan CountyLoganColorado
Governor John Hickenlooper declared a disaster emergency on September 12, 2013, in 14 counties: Adams, Arapahoe, Broomfield, Boulder, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan, Pueblo, Washington and Weld.

Morgan County, Colorado

MorganMorgan CountyColorado
Governor John Hickenlooper declared a disaster emergency on September 12, 2013, in 14 counties: Adams, Arapahoe, Broomfield, Boulder, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan, Pueblo, Washington and Weld.