2013 Egyptian coup d'état

military coupcoup d'étatoverthrow2013 coup d'état2013 Egyptian coupthe 2013 coupdeposedouster2013 Egyptian coup d'etat3 July 2013 Coup
The 2013 Egyptian coup d'état took place on 3 July 2013.wikipedia
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June 2013 Egyptian protests

anti-government protests2013 revolutionJune protests
The move came after the military's ultimatum for the government to "resolve its differences" with protesters during widespread national protests.
The events ended with the 2013 Egyptian coup d'état after millions of protesters across Egypt took to the streets and demanded the immediate resignation of the president.

Mohamed Morsi

Mohammed MorsiMorsiMohammad Morsi
Egyptian army chief General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi led a coalition to remove the President of Egypt, Mohamed Morsi, from power and suspended the Egyptian constitution of 2012.
Mohamed Mohamed Morsi Issa Al-Ayyat (محمد محمد مرسي عيسى العياط, ALA-LC: Muḥammad Muḥammad Mursī ʿĪsā al-ʿAyyāṭ, ; 8 August 1951 – 17 June 2019) was an Egyptian politician and engineer who served as the fifth President of Egypt, from 30 June 2012 to 3 July 2013, when General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi removed him from office in the coup d'état after the June protests.

Post-coup unrest in Egypt (2013–2014)

Post-coup unrest in EgyptPost-coup unrest in Egypt (2013–14)Civil unrest
Ensuing protests in favour of Morsi were violently suppressed culminating with the dispersal and massacre of pro-Morsi sit-ins on 14 August 2013, amid ongoing unrest; journalists, and several hundred protestors were killed by police and military force.
Protests against the 2013 Egyptian coup d'état erupted in July 2013.

Muslim Brotherhood

the Muslim BrotherhoodMuslim BrothersIslamic brotherhood
The military arrested Morsi and Muslim Brotherhood leaders, and declared Chief Justice of the Supreme Constitutional Court Adly Mansour as the interim president of Egypt.
The Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood was legalized in 2011 and won several elections, including the 2012 presidential election when its candidate Mohamed Morsi became Egypt's first president to gain power through an election, though one year later, following massive demonstrations and unrest, he was overthrown by the military and placed under house arrest.

Abdel Fattah el-Sisi

Abdel Fattah al-SisiAbdul Fatah al-Sisiel-Sisi
Egyptian army chief General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi led a coalition to remove the President of Egypt, Mohamed Morsi, from power and suspended the Egyptian constitution of 2012.
As Minister of Defence, and ultimately Commander-in-Chief of the Egyptian Armed Forces, Sisi was involved in the military coup that removed Morsi from office on July 3, 2013, in response to June 2013 Egyptian protests, called a revolution by its proponents.

August 2013 Rabaa massacre

Rabaa massacreviolent crackdownAugust 2013 Egyptian raids
Ensuing protests in favour of Morsi were violently suppressed culminating with the dispersal and massacre of pro-Morsi sit-ins on 14 August 2013, amid ongoing unrest; journalists, and several hundred protestors were killed by police and military force.
The two sites had been occupied by supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi, who had been removed from office by the military a month earlier in a military coup d'etat against him that came in support of mass protests against him.

Egyptian revolution of 2011

2011 Egyptian revolutionEgyptian revolution2011 Egyptian protests
In February 2011, Hosni Mubarak resigned after 18 days of mass demonstrations that ended his 29-year rule of Egypt.
On 3 July 2013, Morsi was deposed by a coup d'état led by the minister of defense, General Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, as millions of Egyptians took to the streets in support of early elections.

2012 Egyptian presidential election

2012 presidential electionpresidential electionpresidential candidate
In June 2012, Mohamed Morsi won the presidential election with 51.73% of total votes to become the first democratically elected president of Egypt.
Morsi, however, lasted little over a year before he was ousted in a military coup in July 2013.

Anti-Coup Alliance

National Coalition for Supporting LegitimacyNational Legitimacy Support CoalitionNational Alliance to Support Legitimacy
As the first anniversary of Morsi's presidential inauguration approached in 2013, his supporters such as the National Coalition for Supporting Legitimacy started demonstrations at multiple places including El-Hossari Mosque, El-Nahda Square, outside Cairo University, outside Al-Rayan Mosque in the posh suburb of Maadi, and in Ain Shams district. He considered all previously-mentioned incidents as "accusations" to Islamists, to which he reacted by starting the Christians Against the Coup movement in demand of "reestablishing democracy", joining with his movement the Anti-Coup Alliance.
The Anti-Coup Alliance (also known as the National Alliance Supporting Legitimacy) is a coalition in Egypt formed to defeat the ouster of former president Mohamed Morsi.

Tamarod

Tamarod Movement30 June Front
On 28 April 2013, Tamarod was started as a grassroots movement to collect signatures to remove Morsi by 30 June. The Coptic Pope Tawadros II, Grand Imam of al-Azhar Ahmed el-Tayeb, Mohamed ElBaradei and some of the youth leaders of Tamarod, Mahmoud Badr and Mohamed Abdelaziz, spoke in support of the military intervention.
The movement helped launch the June 2013 Egyptian protests which preceded the 2013 Egyptian coup d'état.

Al-Jama'a al-Islamiyya

al-Gama'a al-IslamiyyaGama'at IslamiyaGama'a Islamiyya
Four ministers also resigned on the same day: Tourism Minister Hisham Zazou (who previously offered to resign a few months earlier after Morsi appointed an Islamist member of al-Gama'a al-Islamiyya, the group allegedly responsible of the Luxor massacre, though the group has denied this charge, as governor of Luxor), Communication and IT Minister Atef Helmi, State Minister for Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Hatem Bagato, and State Minister for Environmental Affairs Khaled Abdel Aal, leaving the government with only members of the Freedom and Justice Party.
The group was dedicated to the overthrow of the Egyptian government and replacing it with an Islamic state; the group has committed to peaceful means following the coup that toppled Mohamed Morsi.

Mohamed ElBaradei

Mohammed ElBaradeiMohamed El BaradeiMuhammad al-Baradei
In November 2012, following the protests against the [[Muslim Brotherhood in post-Mubarak electoral politics of Egypt#President Morsi's temporary assumption of full constitutional power and push for new constitution|Constitutional Declaration]] by Morsi, opposition politicians – including Mohamed ElBaradei, Amr Moussa and Hamdeen Sabahi, according to the Wall Street Journal – started holding confidential meetings with army leaders, in order to discuss ways of removing President Morsi. The Coptic Pope Tawadros II, Grand Imam of al-Azhar Ahmed el-Tayeb, Mohamed ElBaradei and some of the youth leaders of Tamarod, Mahmoud Badr and Mohamed Abdelaziz, spoke in support of the military intervention.
ElBaradei was also featured in the Western press regarding recent politics in Egypt, particularly the 2011 revolution which ousted President Hosni Mubarak, and was the main player in the 2013 Egyptian coup d'état.

Strong Egypt Party

Strong Egypt
The movement was supported by the National Salvation Front, April 6 Youth Movement and Strong Egypt Party.
In July 2013, following the military coup against President Morsi, members of the Strong Egypt Party participated in the Third Square movement, which was created by liberal, leftist and moderate Islamist activists who reject both the Muslim Brotherhood and military rule.

April 6 Youth Movement

April 6 Movement6 April Youth Movement6 April Movement
The movement was supported by the National Salvation Front, April 6 Youth Movement and Strong Egypt Party.
In July 2013, following the military coup against President Morsi, members of 6 April participated in The Third Square, a movement created by liberal, leftist and moderate Islamist activists who reject both Muslim Brotherhood and military rule.

Adly Mansour

Adli MansourAdly Mahmoud Mansour
The military arrested Morsi and Muslim Brotherhood leaders, and declared Chief Justice of the Supreme Constitutional Court Adly Mansour as the interim president of Egypt.
He also served as the acting President of Egypt from 4 July 2013 to 8 June 2014 following the 2013 Egyptian coup d'état by the military which deposed President Mohamed Morsi.

Mahmoud Badr

The Coptic Pope Tawadros II, Grand Imam of al-Azhar Ahmed el-Tayeb, Mohamed ElBaradei and some of the youth leaders of Tamarod, Mahmoud Badr and Mohamed Abdelaziz, spoke in support of the military intervention.
Tamarod claimed to have gathered millions of signatures, that were never independently verified, demanding the resignation of Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi, and organized mass protests which preceded the 2013 Egyptian coup d'état removing Morsi from power.

Constitution of Egypt

Egyptian constitutionconstitutionEgyptian Constitution of 2014
Although the Egyptian constitution ostensibly declares the president as the supreme commander of the armed forces, the Egyptian military is independent of civilian control.
In July 2013, after the ousting of former President Mohammed Morsi, the military announced the schedule for the development of the constitution, with the vote to occur around the end of November 2013.

Mohammed Badie

Mohamed BadieMuhammad Badie
A travel ban was also put on Morsi, the head of his Muslim Brotherhood Mohammed Badie, Badie's deputy Khairat El-Shater, the Muslim Brotherhood's former leader Mahdi Akef, another Muslim Brotherhood figure Mohamed Beltagy, Salafi preacher close to the Muslim Brotherhood Safwat Hegazi and the leader of the al-Wasat Party Abou Elela Mady and his deputy Essam Sultan.
In July 2013, Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi, member of the Muslim Brotherhood, was removed by a coup d'état after the June protests.

Safwat Hegazi

Safwat HegazySafwat Hijazi
A travel ban was also put on Morsi, the head of his Muslim Brotherhood Mohammed Badie, Badie's deputy Khairat El-Shater, the Muslim Brotherhood's former leader Mahdi Akef, another Muslim Brotherhood figure Mohamed Beltagy, Salafi preacher close to the Muslim Brotherhood Safwat Hegazi and the leader of the al-Wasat Party Abou Elela Mady and his deputy Essam Sultan.
A supporter of Mohamed Morsi, he was arrested after the 2013 Egyptian coup d'état.

Al-Nour Party

Nour PartyAl Nour Partyal Nour
The al-Nour party also commented in saying that the events occurred as they were not heard in their call for dialogue.
From January 2013 the party gradually distanced itself from President Mohamed Morsi's Brotherhood government, and came to support the military's July 2013 coup which overthrew Morsi.

Ahmed el-Tayeb

Mohamed Ahmed el-TayebAhmad El-TayebAhmad al-Tayeb
The Coptic Pope Tawadros II, Grand Imam of al-Azhar Ahmed el-Tayeb, Mohamed ElBaradei and some of the youth leaders of Tamarod, Mahmoud Badr and Mohamed Abdelaziz, spoke in support of the military intervention.
He backed the military coup against Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi.

Hamdeen Sabahi

Hamdeen Sabbahi
In November 2012, following the protests against the [[Muslim Brotherhood in post-Mubarak electoral politics of Egypt#President Morsi's temporary assumption of full constitutional power and push for new constitution|Constitutional Declaration]] by Morsi, opposition politicians – including Mohamed ElBaradei, Amr Moussa and Hamdeen Sabahi, according to the Wall Street Journal – started holding confidential meetings with army leaders, in order to discuss ways of removing President Morsi.
In the aftermath of the military coup, defense minister General Abdul Fattah al-Sisi called for mass demonstrations on 26 July 2013 to grant his forces a "mandate" to crack down on "terrorism".

2013 Republican Guard headquarters clashes

51 protesters were killedmassacre" on 8 Julyopened fire killing at least 51 pro-Morsi protesters
That morning, troops opened fire killing at least 51 pro-Morsi protesters at the Republican Guard headquarters in which Morsi was believed to be held.
At least 51 protesters seeking the return of Morsi to power were killed and more than 435 injured in the clashes, in what has been deemed as a massacre by the Muslim Brotherhood and those opposed to the recent coup d'état.

Christians Against the Coup

He considered all previously-mentioned incidents as "accusations" to Islamists, to which he reacted by starting the Christians Against the Coup movement in demand of "reestablishing democracy", joining with his movement the Anti-Coup Alliance.
Christians Against the Coup (CAC), aka Anti-Coup Christians, is an Egyptian Christian movement, founded after the coup d'état on July 2013 in support of the presumed legitimacy of the former President of Egypt, Mohamed Morsi.

Al-Wasat Party

Wasat PartyWasatal Wasat
A travel ban was also put on Morsi, the head of his Muslim Brotherhood Mohammed Badie, Badie's deputy Khairat El-Shater, the Muslim Brotherhood's former leader Mahdi Akef, another Muslim Brotherhood figure Mohamed Beltagy, Salafi preacher close to the Muslim Brotherhood Safwat Hegazi and the leader of the al-Wasat Party Abou Elela Mady and his deputy Essam Sultan.
The leader of the party, Abou Elela Mady, as well as deputy head Essam Sultan, have been detained following the 2013 Egyptian coup d'état.