2017 New Zealand general election

2017 general election2017 election2017New Zealand general election, 201723 September 20172017 election campaigngeneral electionSeptember 2017 general election2017 election result2017 general elections
The 2017 New Zealand general election took place on Saturday 23 September 2017 to determine the membership of the 52nd New Zealand Parliament.wikipedia
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52nd New Zealand Parliament

52nd Parliament52ndGreens Party's Caucus and Greens MPs' responsibilities
The 2017 New Zealand general election took place on Saturday 23 September 2017 to determine the membership of the 52nd New Zealand Parliament.
It was elected at the 2017 general election.

51st New Zealand Parliament

51st Parliament51st2014-2017 term
The previous parliament was elected on 20 September 2014 and was officially dissolved on 22 August 2017.
This Parliament consists of 121 members (120 seats plus one overhang seat) and was in place from September 2014 until August 2017, followed by the 2017 New Zealand general election.

Bill English

EnglishEnglish, BillHon Bill English
Prior to the election, the centre-right National Party, led by Prime Minister Bill English, had governed since 2008 in a minority government with confidence and supply from the Māori, ACT and United Future parties.
In the 2017 general election, National won the largest number of seats but fell short of a majority.

Sixth Labour Government of New Zealand

Labour-led coalition governmentSixth Labour Governmentcoalition government
This marked an end to nine years under the Fifth National Government, and the beginning of the Sixth Labour Government of New Zealand.
Following the 2017 general election held on 23 September 2017, the New Zealand First party held the balance of power between the sitting centre-right National Party government, and the left bloc of the Labour and Green parties.

John Key

KeySir John KeyKey, John
It was the first election for English as incumbent Prime Minister, having replaced John Key on 12 December 2016 and the first since 1975 where both major parties had leadership changes.
Key was expected to contest for a fourth term of office at the 2017 general election, but on 5 December 2016 he resigned as Prime Minister and leader of the National Party.

Green Party of Aotearoa New Zealand

Green PartyGreensGreen
The main opposition parties to the National government were Labour (the official opposition), led by Jacinda Ardern, the Green Party, and New Zealand First.
In the 2017 general election, the Green Party secured 6.3% of the party vote and returned eight MPs.

Jacinda Ardern

ArdernJacinda ArdenRt Hon Jacinda Ardern
The main opposition parties to the National government were Labour (the official opposition), led by Jacinda Ardern, the Green Party, and New Zealand First.
In the general election of 23 September 2017, the Labour Party won 46 seats (a net gain of 14), putting it behind the National Party, which won 56 seats.

New Zealand First

NZ FirstNew Zealand First Party NZ First
The main opposition parties to the National government were Labour (the official opposition), led by Jacinda Ardern, the Green Party, and New Zealand First.
During the 2017 election, the party's number of MPs dropped to nine members.

New Zealand National Party

National PartyNationalThe National Party
Prior to the election, the centre-right National Party, led by Prime Minister Bill English, had governed since 2008 in a minority government with confidence and supply from the Māori, ACT and United Future parties.
At the 2017 general election, the party gained 44.4 percent of the party vote and won 56 seats, making it the largest caucus in the House of Representatives.

ACT New Zealand

ACTACT PartyAssociation of Consumers and Taxpayers
Prior to the election, the centre-right National Party, led by Prime Minister Bill English, had governed since 2008 in a minority government with confidence and supply from the Māori, ACT and United Future parties.
During the 2017 general election, ACT kept its sole seat in Epsom and received 0.5% of the popular vote.

Winston Peters

Rt Hon Winston PetersPeters, Winston Winston Peters
On 19 October 2017, New Zealand First leader Winston Peters announced that the party was intending to form a minority coalition government with the Labour Party of 55 seats, with confidence and supply agreement from the Green Party.
In the 2017 election, Peters lost his electorate seat of Northland but NZ First won 9 seats overall, with 7.2% of the party vote.

Peter Dunne

Dunne, PeterPeter Francis Dunne
United Future leader and sole MP Peter Dunne retired from politics during the campaign due to poor polling in his electorate of Ōhāriu and his successor failed to win the seat.
On 21 August 2017, Dunne announced that he would retire from politics and pulled out of campaigning for re-election at the 2017 New Zealand general election.

Early voting

Advance votingadvance pollvote early
Advance voting proved popular, with 1.24 million votes cast before election day, more than the previous two elections combined.
This grew to 48% in the 2017 election.

New Zealand Defence Force

New Zealand Armed ForcesNew ZealandNZDF
Mark was appointed Minister of Defence as a member of the Labour-NZ First government following the 2017 New Zealand general election, replacing the former Minister of Defence, Mark Mitchell.

Mixed-member proportional representation

mixed member proportional representationMixed Member Proportionalmixed-member proportional
Voters elected 120 members to the House of Representatives under New Zealand's mixed-member proportional (MMP) voting system, a proportional representation system in which 71 members were elected from single-member electorates and 49 members were elected from closed party lists.
In the 2017 New Zealand election, 27.33% of voters split their vote (voted for a local candidate of a different party than their party vote) compared to 31.64% in 2014.

United Future

United Future New ZealandUnited Future Party United Future
Prior to the election, the centre-right National Party, led by Prime Minister Bill English, had governed since 2008 in a minority government with confidence and supply from the Māori, ACT and United Future parties. United Future leader and sole MP Peter Dunne retired from politics during the campaign due to poor polling in his electorate of Ōhāriu and his successor failed to win the seat.
Between 2008 and 2017, United Future was solely represented in Parliament by party leader Peter Dunne, who represented the Ōhāriu electorate in Wellington.

Māori Party

MāoriMaori Party Māori
Prior to the election, the centre-right National Party, led by Prime Minister Bill English, had governed since 2008 in a minority government with confidence and supply from the Māori, ACT and United Future parties.
The Māori Party failed to win any seats in the 2017 election and left Parliament.

James Shaw (New Zealand politician)

James ShawHon James ShawShaw, James
The Green Party announced on 21 October its three ministers outside cabinet and one parliamentary under-secretary slots as James Shaw, Julie Anne Genter, Jan Logie and Eugenie Sage.
Following Metiria Turei's resignation in August 2017, Shaw became the party's sole leader for the duration of the 2017 general election.

Whanganui (New Zealand electorate)

WanganuiWhanganuiWanganui electorate
It has been held by Harete Hipango of the National Party since the 2017 general election.

Helensville (New Zealand electorate)

HelensvilleHelensville electoratean electorate seat
The MP for Helensville is Chris Penk of the National Party, who has held the seat since the 2017 general election.

Metiria Turei

Turei, MetiriaElectoral history of Metiria TureiMetiria Stanton Turei
Labour was the only parliamentary party to gain support but a large portion came at the expense of the Green Party, who lost almost half their seats (dropping from 14 to 8) following co-leader Metiria Turei's resignation over self-admitted benefit and electoral fraud.
During the 2017 election campaign, Turei publicly stated during an interview on TVNZ's Q+A Show that the New Zealand First leader Winston Peters "was on a roll partly because of a very racist approach to immigration."

Waikato (New Zealand electorate)

WaikatoWaikato electorate
The current electorate was re-established for the and has been represented by Tim van de Molen for the National Party since the 2017 general election.

Rongotai (New Zealand electorate)

RongotaiRongotai electorate
He has held this position since the 2017 general election.

East Coast Bays (New Zealand electorate)

East Coast BaysEast Coast Bays electorate
The electorate has been held by Erica Stanford of the National Party since the 2017 general election.