2018–19 United States federal government shutdown

government shutdownUnited States federal government shutdown of 2018–2019federal government shutdown2018–19 federal government shutdown2018–192019 government shutdown35-day shutdown of 2018-2019Further Additional Continuing Appropriations Act, 2019partial government shutdownpartially shut down
The United States federal government shutdown of 2018–2019 occurred from midnight EST on December 22, 2018, until January 25, 2019 (35 days).wikipedia
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115th United States Congress

115th Congress115th115th U.S. Congress
It occurred when the 115th United States Congress and Donald Trump could not agree on an appropriations bill to fund the operations of the federal government for the 2019 fiscal year, or a temporary continuing resolution that would extend the deadline for passing a bill.

Presidency of Donald Trump

Trump administrationDonald Trump administrationadministration
It was the longest U.S. government shutdown in history, and the second federal government shutdown involving furloughs during the presidency of Donald Trump.
Trump's demand for federal funding of a U.S.–Mexico border wall resulted in the 2018–2019 government shutdown (the longest in American history) and followed with Trump's declaration of a national emergency regarding the U.S. southern border.

Trump wall

border wallU.S.–Mexico border walla new wall
The shutdown stemmed from an impasse over Trump's demand for $5.7 billion in federal funds for a U.S.–Mexico border wall.
In 2018–19 the federal government was partly shut down for 35 days because of Trump's insistence that he would veto any spending bill that did not include $5.7 billion in border wall funding.

Government shutdowns in the United States

government shutdownshutdownUnited States federal government shutdown of 2018
It was the longest U.S. government shutdown in history, and the second federal government shutdown involving furloughs during the presidency of Donald Trump.
Some of the most significant shutdowns in U.S. history have included the 21-day shutdown of 1995–1996 during the Bill Clinton administration over opposition to major spending cuts; the 16-day shutdown in 2013 during the Barack Obama administration caused by a dispute over implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; and the 35-day shutdown of 2018-2019 during the Donald Trump administration, the longest shutdown in US history, caused by a dispute over the funding amount for an expansion of the U.S.–Mexico border barrier.

2019 United States federal budget

Consolidated Appropriations Act, 20192019 fiscal year2019
It occurred when the 115th United States Congress and Donald Trump could not agree on an appropriations bill to fund the operations of the federal government for the 2019 fiscal year, or a temporary continuing resolution that would extend the deadline for passing a bill.
A gap between the second and third of these led to the 2018–19 federal government shutdown.

116th United States Congress

116th Congress116th116th U.S. Congress
Congress adjourned on December 22 for the Christmas and holiday season, with many predicting that the shutdown would not be resolved until the start of the 116th Congress.

2013 United States federal government shutdown

United States federal government shutdown of 2013government shutdown2013 government shutdown
This strategy has been compared to one used by Republicans during the 2013 shutdown in the form of a series of fourteen mini-continuing resolutions.
The 16-day-long shutdown of October 2013 was the third-longest government shutdown in U.S. history, after the 35-day 2018–2019 shutdown and the 21-day 1995–96 shutdown.

January 2019 Oval Office address

addressed the nation from the Oval Office at 9 p.m. EST on January 8first prime time addresshis first Oval Office address
Trump addressed the nation from the Oval Office at 9 p.m. EST on January 8, in a nationally televised address broadcast on both network and cable television.
On January 8, 2019, the 17th day of a partial shutdown of the United States federal government, President Donald Trump delivered an address on illegal immigration from the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C. Major television networks broadcast the president's speech as well as the Democratic response.

Nancy Pelosi

PelosiRep. Nancy PelosiNancy D'Alesandro Pelosi
On December 11, Trump held a televised meeting with Speaker-designate Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer in the Oval Office and asked them to support an appropriation of $5.7 billion for funding of a border wall.
At the start of the 116th Congress, Pelosi opposed President Trump's attempts to use the 2018–19 federal government shutdown (which she called a "hostage-taking" of civil servants) as leverage to build a substantial wall on the American border.

2019 State of the Union Address

State of the Union Address2019 State of the UnionFebruary 5, 2019
On January 16, Pelosi sent a letter to Trump that indicated the House would be unavailable for the 2019 State of the Union Address that was scheduled for January 29.
Originally scheduled for January 29, House Speaker, Nancy Pelosi, communicated on January 16 that pursuant to the month-long shutdown of the federal government, citing fears of security concerns regarding unpaid Secret Service members, the President could reschedule the Address or submit a written State of the Union to Congress.

Mitch McConnell

Senator Mitch McConnellMinority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnel
For several weeks, Trump continued to maintain that he would veto any bill that did not fund an entire border wall, and Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell blocked the Senate from considering any appropriations legislation that Trump would not support, including the bill that had previously passed.
From December 22, 2018 until January 25, 2019, the federal government was shut down when Congress refused to give in to Trump's demand for $5.7 billion in federal funds for a U.S.–Mexico border wall.

Joe Manchin

Joe Manchin IIIManchinJoseph Manchin III
Democrat Joe Manchin and Republicans Lamar Alexander, Susan Collins, Cory Gardner, Johnny Isakson, Lisa Murkowski and Mitt Romney voted for both plans.
On January 8, 2019, Manchin was one of four Democrats to vote to advance a bill imposing sanctions against the Syrian government and furthering U.S. support for Israel and Jordan as Democratic members of the chamber employed tactics to end the United States federal government shutdown of 2018–2019.

State of the Union

State of the Union Addressannual message to Congressannual message
The delivery of the State of the Union address had been delayed or substantially changed on only two occasions since 1913.
On January 23, 2019, the 2019 State of the Union speech by Donald Trump, originally planned for January 29, 2019, was canceled after an exchange of letters with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi in which she stated she would not proceed with a vote on a resolution to permit him to deliver the speech in the House chamber until the end of 2018–19 United States federal government shutdown.

Lisa Murkowski

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK)Senator Lisa MurkowskiLisa
Democrat Joe Manchin and Republicans Lamar Alexander, Susan Collins, Cory Gardner, Johnny Isakson, Lisa Murkowski and Mitt Romney voted for both plans. Three Republican Senators—Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, and Cory Gardner of Colorado—called for an end to the shutdown.
In January 2019, Senator Murkowski supported both Republican and Democratic bills to end a government shutdown.

Government Employee Fair Treatment Act

Government Employee Fair Treatment Act of 2019
On January 10, the Senate approved by unanimous consent a bill (S.24, the Government Employee Fair Treatment Act of 2019) providing that furloughed federal employees would receive back pay for the period of the furlough once appropriations were restored; the bill was approved the next day by the House on a vote of 411–7.
The Government Employee Fair Treatment Act of 2019 (G.E.F.T.A.) is a United States federal law which requires retroactive pay and leave accrual for federal employees affected by the furlough as a result of the 2018–19 federal government shutdown and any future lapses in appropriations.

Mar-a-Lago

Mar-a-Lago ClubMar-a-Lago National Historic SiteMar-a-Lago, Florida
The shutdown started December 22 and Trump announced that he would cancel his planned trip to Mar-a-Lago for Christmas and stay in Washington, D.C. The meaning of the term "wall" was expected to be an aspect of the negotiations.
One month later, President Trump cancelled his planned Christmas vacation in Mar-a-Lago following the federal government shutdown.

List of United States federal funding gaps

longest U.S. government shutdown in historyfederal funding gaps
It was the longest U.S. government shutdown in history, and the second federal government shutdown involving furloughs during the presidency of Donald Trump.

Secure Fence Act of 2006

Secure Fence Actthe Secure Fence Act
In 2018, Trump requested $ in federal funding for some 700 mi of barrier on the border, mostly to replace 654 mi of aging fence built under the Secure Fence Act of 2006.
Trump’s demand for Congress to appropriate $5.7 billion for the wall resulted in the 2018–19 United States federal government shutdown, which lasted for 35 days.

Jacky Rosen

Jacklyn Rosen
Not voting on either were Republicans Rand Paul and Jim Risch and Democrat Jacky Rosen.
In January 2019, during the 2018–19 United States federal government shutdown, Rosen was one of thirty-four senators to sign a letter to Commissioner of Food and Drugs Scott Gottlieb recognizing the efforts of the FDA to address the effect of the government shutdown on the public health and employees while remaining alarmed "that the continued shutdown will result in increasingly harmful effects on the agency's employees and the safety and security of the nation's food and medical products."

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Folklife FestivalSmithsonian Festival of American FolklifeFestival of American Folklife
The Smithsonian Institution shortened to two days and downscaled its scheduled ten-day 2019 Folklife Festival on the National Mall because of the shutdown's effects.

Sarah Sanders

Sarah Huckabee SandersWhite House Spokeswoman Sarah SandersPress Secretary Sanders
White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said the pending pay raise was an "unnecessary byproduct of the shutdown."
During the 2018-2019 government shutdown caused by Congress's refusal to fulfill President Trump's demand for $5.7 billion in federal funds for a U.S.–Mexico border wall, Sanders argued that a border wall was necessary, claiming that the CBP stopped nearly 4,000 known or suspected terrorists when they crossed the Mexico border in 2018.

2018 Puebla helicopter crash

helicopter crasha helicopter crashdied in office
The shutdown initially prevented the National Transportation Safety Board from assisting the Mexican government's investigation of the 2018 Puebla helicopter crash that killed a state governor and senator; an exception allowed the NTSB to assist with the Mexican government in the investigation along with the Transportation Safety Board of Canada.
Mexico had sought the aid of the United States National Transportation Safety Board; while the NTSB initially stated it could not support the investigation due to the ongoing government shutdown, an exception was made to allow the NTSB to support the investigation alongside investigators from the Transportation Safety Board of Canada.

José Andrés

Jose AndresChef José AndrésJosé '''Andrés
Chef Jose Andres created the #ChefsForFeds program to feed federal workers in Washington, D.C. and by January 21, made announcements to expand the program nationwide.
In January 2019 Andrés opened a World Central Kitchen on Pennsylvania Ave, Washington DC to feed federal workers that were furloughed during the government shutdown.

Paine Field

Everett Army Air FieldSnohomish County AirportEverett
Issues in receiving certification and oversight from the FAA led to a month-long delay in the commencement of passenger service at Paine Field in Everett, Washington.
Alaska later announced in January 2019 that it was tentatively postponing the start of operations from February 11 to March 4, 2019, due to the 2018–19 United States federal government shutdown further delaying governmental approval to begin service.

Joshua Tree National Park

Joshua TreeJoshua Tree National MonumentJoshua Tree Desert
Access to major parts of Sequoia and Kings Canyon parks were closed, and at Joshua Tree National Park, the administration policy of leaving parks open to visitors despite the staff furloughs resulted in park damage, including the toppling of protected trees.
During the 2018–2019 federal government shutdown, reports of vandalism spiked as visitors allegedly chopped down Joshua trees, set illegal fires, drove off road, and spray-painted rocks.