2685 Masursky

2685 Masursky, provisional designation, is a stony Eunomian asteroid from the central regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 11 km in diameter.wikipedia
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Cassini–Huygens

CassiniCassini spacecraftCassini'' spacecraft
In January 2000, the Cassini space probe observed the S-type asteroid from afar during its coast to Saturn. Little was known about Masursky until the Cassini–Huygens space probe, en route to Jupiter and Saturn, flew past it on 23 January 2000.
The voyage to Saturn included flybys of Venus (April 1998 and July 1999), Earth (August 1999), the asteroid 2685 Masursky, and Jupiter (December 2000).

Edward L. G. Bowell

E. BowellTed BowellBowell
It was discovered on 3 May 1981, by American astronomer Edward Bowell at the Anderson Mesa Station near Flagstaff, Arizona, and named after American planetary geologist Harold Masursky.

Eunomia family

EunomiaEunomian asteroidEunomian interloper
Masursky is a member of the Eunomia family (502), a prominent family of stony asteroids and the largest one in the intermediate main belt with more than 5,000 members.
The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft flew by 2685 Masursky, a small family member, in 2000.

Harold Masursky

It was discovered on 3 May 1981, by American astronomer Edward Bowell at the Anderson Mesa Station near Flagstaff, Arizona, and named after American planetary geologist Harold Masursky.
A crater on Mars and the asteroid 2685 Masursky were named in his honor.

Asteroid belt

main-beltmain beltmain-belt asteroid
2685 Masursky, provisional designation, is a stony Eunomian asteroid from the central regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 11 km in diameter.
Galileo imaged 951 Gaspra in 1991 and 243 Ida in 1993, NEAR imaged 253 Mathilde in 1997 and landed on 433 Eros in February of 2001, Cassini imaged 2685 Masursky in 2000, Stardust imaged 5535 Annefrank in 2002, New Horizons imaged 132524 APL in 2006, Rosetta imaged 2867 Šteins in September 2008 and 21 Lutetia in July 2010, and Dawn orbited Vesta between July 2011 and September 2012 and has orbited Ceres since March 2015.

Asteroid

asteroidsminor bodyMinor Planet
2685 Masursky, provisional designation, is a stony Eunomian asteroid from the central regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 11 km in diameter.

Anderson Mesa Station

Anderson MesaAnderson Mesa Stn.Lowell Observatory
It was discovered on 3 May 1981, by American astronomer Edward Bowell at the Anderson Mesa Station near Flagstaff, Arizona, and named after American planetary geologist Harold Masursky.

S-type asteroid

SS-typestony asteroids
In January 2000, the Cassini space probe observed the S-type asteroid from afar during its coast to Saturn. Cassini's observations had cast some doubt on its composition, but later ground-based spectroscopy has confirmed its stony S-type spectrum, which is also the Eunomia family's overall spectral type.

Asteroid family

familybackground populationJovian background population
Masursky is a member of the Eunomia family (502), a prominent family of stony asteroids and the largest one in the intermediate main belt with more than 5,000 members.

Kirkwood gap

inneroutercentral
It orbits the Sun in the central main-belt at a distance of 2.3–2.9 AU once every 4 years and 1 month (1,505 days; semi-major axis of 2.57 AU).

Astronomical unit

AUastronomical unitsAUs
It orbits the Sun in the central main-belt at a distance of 2.3–2.9 AU once every 4 years and 1 month (1,505 days; semi-major axis of 2.57 AU).

Semi-major and semi-minor axes

semi-major axissemimajor axissemi-major axes
It orbits the Sun in the central main-belt at a distance of 2.3–2.9 AU once every 4 years and 1 month (1,505 days; semi-major axis of 2.57 AU).

Orbital eccentricity

eccentricityeccentriceccentricities
Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.11 and an inclination of 12° with respect to the ecliptic.

Orbital inclination

inclinationinclinedtilted
Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.11 and an inclination of 12° with respect to the ecliptic.

Degree (angle)

°degreesdegree
Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.11 and an inclination of 12° with respect to the ecliptic.

Ecliptic

ecliptical orbitsecliptic planeplane of the ecliptic
Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.11 and an inclination of 12° with respect to the ecliptic.

McDonald Observatory

McDonaldMcDonald Obs.Fort Davis
The asteroid was first observed as at McDonald Observatory in November 1950.

Observation arc

Arcarc length
The body's observation arc begins with its observation as at Cerro El Roble Observatory in August 1973, nearly 8 years prior to its official discovery observation at Anderson Mesa.

National Astronomical Observatory (Chile)

Cerro El RobleNational Astronomical ObservatoryCerro El Roble Stn.
The body's observation arc begins with its observation as at Cerro El Roble Observatory in August 1973, nearly 8 years prior to its official discovery observation at Anderson Mesa.

Jupiter

Jovianplanet JupiterGiove
Little was known about Masursky until the Cassini–Huygens space probe, en route to Jupiter and Saturn, flew past it on 23 January 2000.

Saturn

Saturn's atmosphereExploration of Saturnhome planet
Little was known about Masursky until the Cassini–Huygens space probe, en route to Jupiter and Saturn, flew past it on 23 January 2000.

Lunar distance (astronomy)

lunar distancesLDlunar distance
Because Cassini passed the asteroid at a distance of 1.6 million kilometers (approximately 4 lunar distances), the images it returned showed nothing more than a dot.

Asteroid spectral types

B–Vspectral typeTholen
Cassini's observations had cast some doubt on its composition, but later ground-based spectroscopy has confirmed its stony S-type spectrum, which is also the Eunomia family's overall spectral type.

Angular diameter

apparent diameterangular sizeapparent size
During its flyby in January 2000, Cassini–Huygens estimated a mean-diameter of approximately 15–20 kilometers, based on an angular diameter of 0.81–1.08 arcseconds just hours before its closest approach.

Minute and second of arc

masarcsecondarc second
During its flyby in January 2000, Cassini–Huygens estimated a mean-diameter of approximately 15–20 kilometers, based on an angular diameter of 0.81–1.08 arcseconds just hours before its closest approach.