42nd Street (Manhattan)

42nd StreetWest 42nd Street42nd42nd StreetsEast 42nd StreetForty-Second Street42nd St.42nd Street in ManhattanDeuceWest 42nd
42nd Street is a major crosstown street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, running primarily in Midtown Manhattan and Hell's Kitchen.wikipedia
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Grand Central Terminal

Grand Central StationGrand CentralTerminal City
The street is the site of some of New York's best known buildings, including (east to west) the headquarters of the United Nations, Chrysler Building, Grand Central Terminal, New York Public Library Main Branch, Times Square, and the Port Authority Bus Terminal.
Grand Central Terminal (GCT; also referred to as Grand Central Station or simply as Grand Central) is a commuter rail terminal located at 42nd Street and Park Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.

Chrysler Building

Chrysler405 Lexington AvenueChrysler Building, Ground Floor Interior
The street is the site of some of New York's best known buildings, including (east to west) the headquarters of the United Nations, Chrysler Building, Grand Central Terminal, New York Public Library Main Branch, Times Square, and the Port Authority Bus Terminal.
The Chrysler Building is an Art Deco–style skyscraper located in the Turtle Bay neighborhood on the East Side of Manhattan, New York City, near Midtown Manhattan, at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue.

Times Square

Time SquareLongacre SquareNew York Times Square
The street is the site of some of New York's best known buildings, including (east to west) the headquarters of the United Nations, Chrysler Building, Grand Central Terminal, New York Public Library Main Branch, Times Square, and the Port Authority Bus Terminal. The corner of 42nd Street and Broadway, at the southeast corner of Times Square, was the eastern terminus of the Lincoln Highway, the first road across the United States, which was conceived and mapped in 1913.
It stretches from West 42nd to West 47th Streets.

Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan

Hell's KitchenHell’s KitchenClinton
42nd Street is a major crosstown street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, running primarily in Midtown Manhattan and Hell's Kitchen.
Included in the transition area on Eighth Avenue are the Port Authority Bus Terminal at 42nd Street, the Pride of Midtown fire station (from which an entire shift, 15 firefighters, died at the World Trade Center), several theatres including Studio 54, the original soup stand of Seinfelds "The Soup Nazi"' and the Hearst Tower.

New York Public Library Main Branch

New York Public LibraryMain BranchBerg Collection
The street is the site of some of New York's best known buildings, including (east to west) the headquarters of the United Nations, Chrysler Building, Grand Central Terminal, New York Public Library Main Branch, Times Square, and the Port Authority Bus Terminal.
The site, along Fifth Avenue between 40th and 42nd Streets, is located directly east of Bryant Park, on the site of the Croton Reservoir.

Port Authority Bus Terminal

bus terminalNew YorkPort Authority
The street is the site of some of New York's best known buildings, including (east to west) the headquarters of the United Nations, Chrysler Building, Grand Central Terminal, New York Public Library Main Branch, Times Square, and the Port Authority Bus Terminal.
The bus terminal is located in Midtown at 625 Eighth Avenue between 40th Street and 42nd Street, one block east of the Lincoln Tunnel and one block west of Times Square.

Tenderloin, Manhattan

TenderloinTenderloin districtThe Tenderloin
Between the 1870s and 1890s, 42nd Street became the uptown boundary of the mainstream theatre district, which started around 23rd Street, as the entertainment district of the Tenderloin gradually moved northward.
The area originally ran from 24th Street to 42nd Street and from Fifth Avenue to Seventh Avenue.

Broadway (Manhattan)

BroadwayGreat White WayCanyon of Heroes
The street is known for its theaters, especially near the intersection with Broadway at Times Square, and as such is also the name of the region of the theater district (and, at times, the red-light district) near that intersection. The corner of 42nd Street and Broadway, at the southeast corner of Times Square, was the eastern terminus of the Lincoln Highway, the first road across the United States, which was conceived and mapped in 1913.
Since 2009, vehicular traffic has been banned at Times Square between 47th and 42nd Streets, and at Herald Square between 35th and 33rd Streets as part of a pilot program; the right-of-way is intact and reserved for cyclists and pedestrians.

History of Grand Central Terminal

Grand Central DepotGrand Central Stationconstruction of Grand Central Terminal
Cornelius Vanderbilt began the construction of Grand Central Depot in 1869 on 42nd Street at Fourth Avenue as the terminal for his Central, Hudson, Harlem and New Haven commuter rail lines, because city regulations required that trains be pulled by horse below 42nd Street.
When the city banned steam trains below 42nd Street c.

Manhattan

Manhattan, New YorkManhattan, New York CityNew York
42nd Street is a major crosstown street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, running primarily in Midtown Manhattan and Hell's Kitchen.
At Lexington Avenue and 42nd Street, auto executive Walter Chrysler and his architect William Van Alen developed plans to build the structure's trademark 185 ft spire in secret, pushing the Chrysler Building to 1046 ft and making it the tallest in the world when it was completed in 1929.

Lincoln Highway

Lincoln Highway AssociationLincolnLincoln Way
The corner of 42nd Street and Broadway, at the southeast corner of Times Square, was the eastern terminus of the Lincoln Highway, the first road across the United States, which was conceived and mapped in 1913.

Theater District, Manhattan

Theater DistrictBroadway Theater DistrictBroadway
Between the 1870s and 1890s, 42nd Street became the uptown boundary of the mainstream theatre district, which started around 23rd Street, as the entertainment district of the Tenderloin gradually moved northward. The street is known for its theaters, especially near the intersection with Broadway at Times Square, and as such is also the name of the region of the theater district (and, at times, the red-light district) near that intersection.
The City of New York defines the subdistrict for zoning purposes to extend from 40th Street to 57th Street and from Sixth Avenue to Eighth Avenue, with an additional area west of Eighth Avenue from 42nd Street to 45th Street.

Grindhouse

Grind Housegrind housesGrindhouse film
From the late 1950s until the late 1980s, 42nd Street, nicknamed the "Deuce", was the cultural center of American grindhouse theaters, which spawned an entire subculture.

Broadway theatre

BroadwayBroadway musicalBroadway theater
Lloyd Bacon and Busby Berkeley's 1933 film musical 42nd Street, starring 30s heartthrobs Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler, displays the bawdy and colorful mixture of Broadway denizens and lowlifes in Manhattan during the Depression.
In 1836, Mayor Cornelius Lawrence opened 42nd Street and invited Manhattanites to "enjoy the pure clean air."

New Amsterdam Theatre

New Amsterdam TheaterNew AmsterdamAmsterdam Theater
In 1993, Disney Theatrical Productions bought the New Amsterdam Theatre, which it renovated a few years later.
The New Amsterdam Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 214 West 42nd Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenues in the Theater District of Manhattan, New York City, off of Times Square.

New 42nd Street

The Duke on 42nd StreetDuke on 42nd StreetDuke Theatre
In 1990, the city government took over six of the historic theatres on the block of 42nd Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenues, and New 42nd Street, a not-for-profit organization, was formed to oversee their renovation and reuse, as well as to construct new theatres and a rehearsal space.
In 1990, the New 42nd Street was formed to oversee the redevelopment of seven neglected and historic theatres on 42nd Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenues, and to restore the block to a desirable tourist destination in Manhattan.

Daily News Building

News Building220 East 42nd StreetDaily News Building, First Floor Interior
The Daily News Building, also known as The News Building, is a 476 ft skyscraper located at 220 East 42nd Street between Second and Third Avenues in the Turtle Bay neighborhood of Midtown Manhattan, New York City.

110 East 42nd Street

Bowery Savings Bank Building
It is located on the south side of 42nd Street, across from Grand Central Terminal to the north, and between the Pershing Square Building to the west and the Chanin Building to the east.

Eighth Avenue (Manhattan)

Central Park WestEighth AvenueEighth
In 1990, the city government took over six of the historic theatres on the block of 42nd Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenues, and New 42nd Street, a not-for-profit organization, was formed to oversee their renovation and reuse, as well as to construct new theatres and a rehearsal space.
Also, along with Times Square, the portion of Eighth Avenue from 42nd Street to 50th Street was an informal red-light district in the late 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s before it was controversially renovated into a more family friendly environment under the first mayoral administration of Rudolph Giuliani.

Tudor City

Corcoran's RoostTudor City Historic District
Forty-first and 43rd Streets do not reach First Avenue but end at a three-block-long north–south street called Tudor City Place, which crosses 42nd Street on an overpass.

Pershing Square Building

Pershing Square café
It is located on the eastern side of Park Avenue between 41st and 42nd Streets, just south of Grand Central Terminal.

One Vanderbilt

One Vanderbilt (also One Vanderbilt Place ) is a 67-floor supertall skyscraper under construction at the corner of 42nd Street and Vanderbilt Avenue in midtown Manhattan, New York City.

500 Fifth Avenue

500 Fifth Avenue Buildingredevelopment of the property
500 Fifth Avenue is a 60-floor, 697 ft office building located between West 42nd and 43rd Streets in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.

Chanin Building

The Chanin Building is a brick and terra-cotta skyscraper located at 122 East 42nd Street, at the corner of Lexington Avenue, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.

Commissioners' Plan of 1811

March 1811Commissioner's Plan of 18111811
The street was designated by the Commissioners' Plan of 1811 that established the Manhattan street grid as one of 15 east-west streets that would be 100 ft in width (while other streets were designated as 60 ft in width).
Fifteen crosstown streets were designated as 100 ft wide: 14th, 23rd, 34th, 42nd, 57th, 72nd, 79th, 86th, 96th, 106th, 116th, 125th, 135th, 145th and 155th Streets.