555 (telephone number)

555555 telephone number5-5-5555 area code555 number555 telephone number prefix555-1234555-xxxxfictional telephone numbersfictitious number
The telephone number prefix 555 is a central office code in the North American Numbering Plan, used as the leading part of a group of 10,000 telephone numbers, 555-XXXX, in each numbering plan area (NPA).wikipedia
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Fictitious telephone number

Drama usefictional numbersfictional telephone number
The central office code is also used for fictitious telephone numbers in North American television shows, films, video games, and other media in order to prevent practical jokers and curious callers from bothering telephone subscribers and organizations by calling telephone numbers they see in works of fiction.
In North America, the area served by the North American Numbering Plan (NANPA) system of area codes, fictitious telephone numbers are usually of the form (XXX) 555-xxxx.

North American Numbering Plan

Area codeArea codesArea code(s)
The telephone number prefix 555 is a central office code in the North American Numbering Plan, used as the leading part of a group of 10,000 telephone numbers, 555-XXXX, in each numbering plan area (NPA).
Despite the widespread usage of NXX 555 for fictional telephone numbers, the only such numbers now specifically reserved for fictional use are 555-0100 through 555-0199, with the remaining 555 numbers released for actual assignment as information numbers.

Telephone number

phone numbertelephone numbersphone numbers
The telephone number prefix 555 is a central office code in the North American Numbering Plan, used as the leading part of a group of 10,000 telephone numbers, 555-XXXX, in each numbering plan area (NPA).
The use of numbers starting in 555- (KLondike-5) to represent fictional numbers in U.S. movies, television, and literature originated in this period.

Bruce Almighty

Almighty
Tommy Tutone's song "867-5309/Jenny" and the cinematic release of Bruce Almighty displaying 776-2323 as a number to call God both led to misdialed calls in multiple area codes.
Since God contacts Bruce using an actual phone number rather than a number in the standard fictional 555 telephone exchange, several people and groups sharing this number subsequently received hundreds of phone calls from people wanting to talk to God, including a church in North Carolina (where the Minister was named Bruce), a Pastor in Northern Wisconsin and a man in Manchester, England.

Misdialed call

wrong numbermisdialmisdialled calls
Tommy Tutone's song "867-5309/Jenny" and the cinematic release of Bruce Almighty displaying 776-2323 as a number to call God both led to misdialed calls in multiple area codes.
This is often avoided by using reserved or invalid numbers (such as 555 (telephone number)), or by displaying a real area code and number which belongs to the publisher of the fictional work.

Area code 600

600610622
The entire 555 exchange is reserved in all overlay North American toll-free area codes (800, 844, 855, 866, 877, 888) and in Canada's rarely used non-geographic area code 600.
There are 798 possible +1-600- exchange prefixes (200 to 999, with 555 and 911 not issued).

Directory assistance

directory enquiries118 5001-800-555-1212
555-1212 is one of the standard numbers for this purpose throughout the United States and Canada.
555 (telephone number)

Finder-Spyder

Finder-Spyder is a fictional brand of Web search engine that appears in numerous, otherwise unaffiliated television shows, used in the same manner as the fictitious 555 telephone number in TV and film.

Stingray (1985 TV series)

Stingray1985 TV series of the same nameother TV series
His background is shadowy; all that is known about him is that he advertises surreptitiously in newspapers, ostensibly offering a "'65 black Stingray, for Barter Only To Right Party" and including a telephone number (555-7687).

555 (number)

555
The telephone exchange for fictitious phone numbers in US movies and video games—see 555 (telephone number) and North American Numbering Plan.

Dirty Work (1998 film)

Dirty WorkDirty Work'' (1998 film)
Mitch and Sam open "Dirty Work", a revenge-for-hire business (the Dirty Work phone number is "555-0187", a fictitious number used later on Saturday Night Live.

555 (disambiguation)

555 (telephone number), a telephone prefix commonly used in films and works of fiction

Klondike

555 (telephone number) (Klondike 5), the fictional telephone number prefix

Channel 37

37UHF Channel 37
Channel 37 is sometimes seen in fiction, the same way telephone numbers with the "555" telephone exchange prefix are used.

Suspension of disbelief

suspend disbeliefwilling suspension of disbeliefbelievable
555 (telephone number)

Placeholder name

placeholderUnknowntemporarily called
Placeholder telephone numbers are often allocated from ranges such as 555 (where +1-areacode-555-1212 is reserved in North America for directory assistance applications) to avoid generating misdialled calls to working numbers. In the United Kingdom, Ofcom has set aside a range of numbers in larger geographic area codes, as well as fictional area code 01632 (0632 having been the code for Newcastle upon Tyne until replaced by 091 in the 1980s), for dramatic use.

500 (number)

500509599
The telephone exchange for fictitious phone numbers in US movies – see 5-5-5

Area codes 702 and 725

702725702 and 725
However, the triple-seven area code was reserved for the same reasons as was the similarly-recognizable 555 area code.

Klamath

Klamath 5, or "555", a common prefix for fictitious telephone numbers

Automatic number announcement circuit

ANAC958-ANACautomatic number announcement
555-1313 is one of the rare uses of the 555 exchange for other than the standard 555-1212 directory information line.

Easter egg (media)

Easter eggEaster eggshidden
Easter eggs may still appear in the content itself, such as a hidden Mickey in a Disney film or a real telephone number instead of a 555 fictitious telephone number.

Domain name

domaindomain namesdomains
A fictitious domain name is a domain name used in a work of fiction or popular culture to refer to a domain that does not actually exist, often with invalid or unofficial top-level domains such as ".web", a usage exactly analogous to the dummy 555 telephone number prefix used in film and other media.