720p

1280x720720p HD1280×720720p50720p60HD720p resolution720P301280 × 720 progressive16:9
720p (1280×720 px; also called HD ready or standard HD) is a progressive HDTV signal format with 720 horizontal lines and an aspect ratio (AR) of 16:9, normally known as widescreen HDTV (1.78:1).wikipedia
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HD ready

HD ready 1080pHD-readyHDTV
720p (1280×720 px; also called HD ready or standard HD) is a progressive HDTV signal format with 720 horizontal lines and an aspect ratio (AR) of 16:9, normally known as widescreen HDTV (1.78:1).
In the United States, a similar "HD Ready" term usually refers to any display that is capable of accepting and displaying a high-definition signal at either 720p, 1080i or 1080p using a component video or digital input, but does not have a built-in HD-capable tuner.

High-definition television

HDTVhigh definitionHD
720p (1280×720 px; also called HD ready or standard HD) is a progressive HDTV signal format with 720 horizontal lines and an aspect ratio (AR) of 16:9, normally known as widescreen HDTV (1.78:1).

AVCHD

AVCHD LiteNXCAMAVCCAM
All major HDTV broadcasting standards (such as SMPTE 292M) include a 720p format, which has a resolution of 1280×720; however, there are other formats, including HDV Playback and AVCHD for camcorders, that use 720p images with the standard HDTV resolution.
NXCAM camcorders offer 1080i, 1080p and 720p recording modes.

ATSC standards

ATSCdigitalATSC standard
When broadcast at 60.00 frames/s frames per second, 720p features the highest temporal resolution possible under the ATSC and DVB standards.
ATSC includes two primary high definition video formats, 1080i and 720p.

Display resolution

resolutionscreen resolutionVideo resolution
The number 720 stands for the 720 horizontal scan lines of image display resolution (also known as 720 pixels of vertical resolution).
(HD) has become popular for most notebook sizes, while (HD+) and (FHD) are available for larger notebooks.

HDV

HDHDV 720phigh definition
All major HDTV broadcasting standards (such as SMPTE 292M) include a 720p format, which has a resolution of 1280×720; however, there are other formats, including HDV Playback and AVCHD for camcorders, that use 720p images with the standard HDTV resolution.
The camcorder offered standard DV recording mode, HDV 720p30 and HDV 480p60.

Arte

Arte France CinémaARTE FranceArte TV
Arte, a dual-language French-German channel produced in collaboration by ARD, ZDF and France Télévisions, broadcasts in German at 720p50 but in French at 1080i50.
Like the national channels of its own respective countries, the German HDTVversion of ARTE broadcasts in 720p50, while the French one broadcasts in 1080i25.

1080p

Full HDFHD1080p30
It is often marketed as Full HD or FHD, to contrast 1080p with 720p resolution screens.

TVE HD

TVE
However, some European broadcasters do use the 720p50 format, such as German broadcasters ARD and ZDF, the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK) and Spanish Radio and Television Corporation (TVE HD).

Telecine

3:2 pulldowninverse telecinejudder
However, 576i and 1080i50 (25 frame/s, 50 Hz), which are common in Europe, generally do not suffer from pull down artifacts as film frames are simply played at 25 frames and the audio pitch corrected by 25/24.
In 59.94 frame/s progressive formats such as 480p60 and 720p60, entire frames (rather than fields) are repeated in a 2:3 pattern, accomplishing the frame rate conversion without interlacing and its associated artifacts.

576p

576p25264×640720x576
In some countries, such as Australia, the 576p resolution standard is technically considered high-definition and was in use by the Special Broadcasting Service (SBS TV) (16:9 the format has aspect ratio 1.468), eventually replaced by 720p for its high-definition subchannel; SBS later changed to using 1080i.

1080i

1080i501080i601080i25
Only Fox-owned television networks and Disney-owned television networks, along with MLB Network and a few other cable networks use 720p as the preferred format for their networks; A+E Networks channels converted from 720p to 1080i sometime in 2013 due to acquired networks already transmitting in the 1080i format.

Pixel

megapixelpxMP
720p (1280×720 px; also called HD ready or standard HD) is a progressive HDTV signal format with 720 horizontal lines and an aspect ratio (AR) of 16:9, normally known as widescreen HDTV (1.78:1).

Aspect ratio (image)

4:3aspect ratio16:9
720p (1280×720 px; also called HD ready or standard HD) is a progressive HDTV signal format with 720 horizontal lines and an aspect ratio (AR) of 16:9, normally known as widescreen HDTV (1.78:1).

16:9 aspect ratio

16:91.78:1widescreen
720p (1280×720 px; also called HD ready or standard HD) is a progressive HDTV signal format with 720 horizontal lines and an aspect ratio (AR) of 16:9, normally known as widescreen HDTV (1.78:1).

SMPTE 292M

HD-SDI
All major HDTV broadcasting standards (such as SMPTE 292M) include a 720p format, which has a resolution of 1280×720; however, there are other formats, including HDV Playback and AVCHD for camcorders, that use 720p images with the standard HDTV resolution.

Frame rate

frames per secondfpsframe/s
The frame rate is standards-dependent, and for conventional broadcasting appears in 50 progressive frames per second in former PAL/SECAM countries (Europe, Australia, others), and 59.94 frames per second in former NTSC countries (North America, Japan, Brazil, others).

Europe

EuropeanEUEuropean continent
The frame rate is standards-dependent, and for conventional broadcasting appears in 50 progressive frames per second in former PAL/SECAM countries (Europe, Australia, others), and 59.94 frames per second in former NTSC countries (North America, Japan, Brazil, others).

Australia

AUSAustralianCommonwealth of Australia
The frame rate is standards-dependent, and for conventional broadcasting appears in 50 progressive frames per second in former PAL/SECAM countries (Europe, Australia, others), and 59.94 frames per second in former NTSC countries (North America, Japan, Brazil, others).

North America

NorthNorth AmericanNA
The frame rate is standards-dependent, and for conventional broadcasting appears in 50 progressive frames per second in former PAL/SECAM countries (Europe, Australia, others), and 59.94 frames per second in former NTSC countries (North America, Japan, Brazil, others).