82nd Airborne Division

82nd Airborne82d Airborne Division82ndU.S. 82nd Airborne Division82nd Division82nd Infantry Division3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division82d2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division3rd Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division
The 82nd Airborne Division is an airborne infantry division of the United States Army, specializing in parachute assault operations into denied areas with a U.S.wikipedia
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328th Infantry Regiment (United States)

328th Infantry Regiment328th Infantry328th
The 164th Infantry Brigade commanded the 327th Infantry Regiment and the 328th Infantry Regiment.
Organized during World War I as part of the 82nd Division, the regiment took part in combat in France as part of the American Expeditionary Forces.

82nd Airborne Division Artillery

157th Field Artillery Brigade82nd Airborne ArtilleryDIVARTY
Also in the division were the 157th Field Artillery Brigade, composed of the 319th, 320th and 321st Field Artillery Regiments and the 307th Trench Mortar Battery; a divisional troops contingent, and a division train.
The 82nd Airborne Division Artillery (DIVARTY) is the divisional artillery command for the 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army, stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

326th Infantry Regiment (United States)

326th Glider Infantry Regiment326th Infantry Regiment326th
The 163rd Infantry Brigade commanded the 325th Infantry Regiment and the 326th Infantry Regiment.
The 326th Infantry Regiment was an infantry regiment of the United States Army that saw active service during World War I, as part of the 82nd Division and fought in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and was inactivated in 1919.

327th Infantry Regiment (United States)

327th Infantry Regiment327th Glider Infantry Regiment327th Infantry
The 164th Infantry Brigade commanded the 327th Infantry Regiment and the 328th Infantry Regiment.
It fought during World War I as part of the 82nd Division.

Division (military)

divisiondivisionsinfantry division
The 82nd Airborne Division is an airborne infantry division of the United States Army, specializing in parachute assault operations into denied areas with a U.S. Department of Defense requirement to "respond to crisis contingencies anywhere in the world within 18 hours".
Nevertheless, some US division types will retain their mission: The 82nd and 101st airborne divisions have airborne infantry BCTs, while the 10th Mountain Division has only light infantry BCTs.

Fort Gordon

Camp GordonFort Gordon, GeorgiaCamp Gordon, Georgia
It was organized on 25 August 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia and later served with distinction on the Western Front in the final months of World War I.
The camp opened in July 1917, becoming a training site and home of the famous 82nd Division.

I Corps (United States)

I CorpsIUS I Corps
The division was briefly assigned to I Corps before falling under the command of IV Corps until late August.
During its time in World War I, I Corps commanded the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 26th, 28th, 32nd, 35th, 36th, 41st, 43rd, 77th, 78th, 80th, 82nd, 90th, 91st, 92nd Infantry Divisions at one point or another.

James M. Gavin

James GavinGeneral James GavinJames Maurice Gavin
During this training period, the division brought together three officers who would ultimately steer the U.S. Army during the following two decades: Matthew Ridgway, James M. Gavin, and Maxwell D. Taylor.
James Maurice "Jumpin' Jim" Gavin (March 22, 1907 – February 23, 1990) was a senior United States Army officer, with the rank of lieutenant general, who was the third Commanding General (CG) of the 82nd Airborne Division during World War II.

Matthew Ridgway

Matthew B. RidgwayMatthew B. RidgewayMatthew Bunker Ridgway
During this training period, the division brought together three officers who would ultimately steer the U.S. Army during the following two decades: Matthew Ridgway, James M. Gavin, and Maxwell D. Taylor.
He fought with distinction during World War II, where he was the Commanding General of the 82nd Airborne Division, leading it in action in Sicily, Italy and Normandy, before taking command of the newly formed XVIII Airborne Corps in August 1944.

United States Army Reserve

Army ReserveU.S. Army ReserveOrganized Reserve
For the next 20 years the 82nd Division existed as a unit of the Organized Reserve.
The 101st Infantry Division was designated a division of the Organized Reserve after World War I and assigned to the state of Wisconsin; unlike the 82nd Airborne Division, the Reserve division was disbanded when the 101st Airborne Division was raised in the Army of the United States on 15 August 1942.

Alvin York

Alvin C. YorkSergeant YorkSergeant Alvin York
A second 82nd soldier, Alvin C. York, received the Medal of Honor for his actions during this campaign.
Persuaded that his religion was not incompatible with military service, York joined the 82nd Division as an infantry private and went to France in 1918.

26th Infantry Division (United States)

26th Infantry Division26th Division26th
The division relieved the 26th Division on 25 June.
The 26th Division was relieved by the 82nd Division on 28 June, moved by train to Meaux, and entered the line again northwest of Chateau Thierry, relieving the 2nd Division on 5 July.

Iraqi security forces

Security forcesIraqi Security ForceIraqi military
More recently, the 82nd Airborne has been conducting operations in Iraq, advising and assisting Iraqi Security Forces.
During the Iraq War, these entities received training and instruction from the U.S. 101st Airborne Division and the 82nd Airborne Division.

Mission Boston

Bostonsecond wavesecure the La Fiere causeway
The division conducted Mission Boston, part of the airborne assault phase of the Operation Overlord plan.
Mission Boston was a parachute combat assault at night by Major General Matthew Ridgway's U.S. 82nd "All American" Airborne Division on June 6, 1944, part of the American airborne landings in Normandy during World War II.

13th Airborne Division (United States)

13th Airborne DivisionU.S. 13th Airborne Division13th
In February 1943 the division received another change when the 326th was transferred to the 13th Airborne Division, being replaced by the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, under James M. Gavin, then a colonel, who was later destined to command the division.
This training was completed by September 1944, but had to be extended by a further four months when the division provided replacements for the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions.

Maxwell D. Taylor

Maxwell TaylorGeneral Maxwell TaylorMax Taylor
During this training period, the division brought together three officers who would ultimately steer the U.S. Army during the following two decades: Matthew Ridgway, James M. Gavin, and Maxwell D. Taylor.
In 1942, Taylor became chief of staff of the 82nd Airborne Division, followed by command of the 82nd Airborne Division Artillery, and took part in combat in Sicily and Italy.

Operation Market Garden

Operation Market-Gardenairborne attack on the NetherlandsMarket Garden
On 5 and 6 June these paratroopers, parachute artillery elements, and the 319th and 320th, boarded hundreds of transport planes and gliders to begin history's largest airborne assault at the time (only Operation Market Garden later that year would be larger).
The US 82nd Airborne Division's failure to capture the main highway bridge over the Waal River at Nijmegen before 20 September delayed the advance by 36 hours.

First Allied Airborne Army

1st Allied Airborne Army1st Allied Airborneairborne
On 2 August 1944 the division became part of the First Allied Airborne Army.
These included the U.S. IX Troop Carrier Command, the U.S. XVIII Airborne Corps, which controlled the 17th, 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions and a number of independent airborne units, all British airborne forces including the 1st and 6th Airborne Divisions plus the Polish 1st Parachute Brigade.

United States Army

U.S. ArmyUS ArmyArmy
The 82nd Airborne Division is an airborne infantry division of the United States Army, specializing in parachute assault operations into denied areas with a U.S. Department of Defense requirement to "respond to crisis contingencies anywhere in the world within 18 hours".

Battle of Arnhem

ArnhemArnhem 1944assault on Arnhem
So the costly successes of the 82nd's Nijmegen bridge seizure was followed by the failure to take the main prize; the British 1st Airborne Division was lost at the Battle of Arnhem.
Montgomery's plan involved dropping the US 101st Airborne Division to capture key bridges around Eindhoven, the US 82nd Airborne Division to secure key crossings around Nijmegen, and the British 1st Airborne Division, with the Polish 1st Independent Parachute Brigade attached, to capture three bridges across the Nederrijn at Arnhem.

505th Infantry Regiment (United States)

505th Parachute Infantry Regiment505th Infantry Regiment505th PIR
In February 1943 the division received another change when the 326th was transferred to the 13th Airborne Division, being replaced by the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, under James M. Gavin, then a colonel, who was later destined to command the division.
The 505th Infantry Regiment, originally the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment (505th PIR), is an airborne infantry regiment of the United States Army, one of four infantry regiments of the 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army, with a long and distinguished history.

Robert P. Mathias

Robert Mathias
During the 6June assault, a 508th platoon leader, First Lieutenant Robert P. Mathias, would be the first U.S. Army officer killed by German fire on D-Day.
In 1944, Lt. Robert P. Mathias was a platoon leader with the 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR) in the 82nd Airborne Division.

Omar Bradley

Omar N. BradleyBradleyGeneral Omar Bradley
It was recalled to active service on 25 March 1942, and reorganized at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, under the command of Major General Omar Bradley.
In February 1942, two months after the American entry into World War II, Bradley was made a temporary major general (a rank made permanent in September 1944) and took command of the 82nd Infantry Division (soon to be redesignated as the 82nd Airborne Division) before succeeding Major General James Garesche Ord as commander of the 28th Infantry Division in June.

Allied invasion of Sicily

Operation HuskySicilyinvasion of Sicily
In April 1943, after several months of tough training, its troopers deployed to the Mediterranean Theater of Operations, under the command of Major General Ridgway to take part in the campaign to invade Sicily.
The initial plan dictated that the U.S. 82nd Airborne Division, commanded by Major General Matthew Ridgway, was to be held as a tactical reserve in Tunisia.

Allied invasion of Italy

Salernoinvasion of ItalyItaly
The division's first two combat operations were parachute assaults into Sicily on 9July and Salerno on 13 September 1943.
Six days later it was replaced by Operation Giant, in which two regiments of the U.S. 82nd Airborne Division (Matthew Ridgway) would seize and hold crossings over the Volturno River.