87th (Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot

87th Regiment of Foot87th Foot87th87th (Prince of Wales's Irish) Regiment of Foot87th Regiment87th Regiments of Foot2/87th (Prince of Wales' Irish) Regiment of Foot2nd Battalion/87th Infantry Regiment87th (The Prince of Wales's Irish) Regiment of Foot87th Fusiliers
The 87th (Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army, raised in 1793.wikipedia
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89th (Princess Victoria's) Regiment of Foot

89th Regiment of Foot89th (The Princess Victoria's) Regiment of Foot89th Foot
Under the Childers Reforms it amalgamated with the 89th (Princess Victoria's) Regiment of Foot to form the Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers) in 1881.
Under the Childers Reforms the regiment amalgamated with the 87th (Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot to form the Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers) in 1881.

Royal Irish Fusiliers

Royal Irish Fusiliers (Princess Victoria's)Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers)Royal Irish Fusilier
Under the Childers Reforms it amalgamated with the 89th (Princess Victoria's) Regiment of Foot to form the Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers) in 1881.
The Royal Irish Fusiliers (Princess Victoria's) was an Irish line infantry regiment of the British Army, formed by the amalgamation of the 87th (Prince of Wales's Irish) Regiment of Foot and the 89th (Princess Victoria's) Regiment of Foot in 1881.

Sir John Doyle, 1st Baronet

John DoyleSir John DoyleGeneral Sir John Doyle
The regiment was raised by General Sir John Doyle as the 87th (The Prince of Wales's Irish) Regiment of Foot, in response to the threat posed by the French Revolution, on 18 September 1793.
Doyle raised his own regiment, the 87th (Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot, for the French Revolutionary Wars in 1793 and served in Holland, Gibraltar and Egypt.

Hugh Gough, 1st Viscount Gough

Hugh GoughSir Hugh GoughLord Gough
1841–1855: F.M. Sir Hugh Gough, 1st Viscount Gough, KT, GCB, GCSI
After serving as a junior officer at the seizure of the Cape of Good Hope during the French Revolutionary Wars, Gough commanded the 2nd Battalion of the 87th (Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot during the Peninsular War.

Siege of Tarifa (1812)

Siege of TarifaTarifabesieged Tarifa
The battalion also took part in the Siege of Tarifa in December 1812 and the Battle of Vitoria in June 1813.
Colonel John Byrne Skerrett's British brigade consisted of the 2nd Battalion of the 47th Foot, 1st Battalion of the 82nd Foot, 2nd Battalion of the 87th Foot, the flank companies of the 1st Battalion of the 11th Foot, one company of the 95th Rifles, one-half squadron of the 2nd King's German Legion Hussar Regiment, and one foot artillery battery.

French Imperial Eagle

EaglesImperial EagleEagle
At Barrosa, Ensign Edward Keogh and Sergeant Patrick Masterson captured the French Imperial Eagle of the 8th Regiment de Ligne.
The first French eagle to be captured by the British was taken by the 87th Regiment of Foot at the Battle of Barrosa on 5 March 1811.

Renmore Barracks

Dún Uí MhaoilíosaDún Úi MhaolíosaMellowes Barracks
As part of the Cardwell Reforms of the 1870s, where single-battalion regiments were linked together to share a single depot and recruiting district in the United Kingdom, the 87th was linked with the 88th Regiment of Foot (Connaught Rangers) and assigned to district no. 68 at Renmore Barracks in Galway.
The barracks became the depot for the 87th (Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot and the 88th Regiment of Foot (Connaught Rangers).

British invasions of the River Plate

English invasionsBritish invasionsBritish invasion
The 1st Battalion sailed for South America in September 1806 and took part in the disastrous expedition under Sir Home Popham: it saw action at the Battle of Montevideo in February 1807 and the unsuccessful attack on Buenos Aires in July 1807.
On the other side of the city a second assault was launched, spearheaded by the 87th Regiment of Foot taking the Spanish defenders in the rear.

Battle of Barrosa

BarrosaBarossaBarrosa (Battle of)
It took part in the Battle of Talavera in July 1809 and the Battle of Barrosa in March 1811.
The capture of the eagle—the first to be won in battle by British forces in the Peninsular wars—cost Ensign Keogh of the 87th his life and was finally secured by Sergeant Patrick Masterson (or Masterman, depending on source).

88th Regiment of Foot (Connaught Rangers)

88th Regiment of Foot88th Foot88th
As part of the Cardwell Reforms of the 1870s, where single-battalion regiments were linked together to share a single depot and recruiting district in the United Kingdom, the 87th was linked with the 88th Regiment of Foot (Connaught Rangers) and assigned to district no. 68 at Renmore Barracks in Galway.
As part of the Cardwell Reforms of the 1870s, where single-battalion regiments were linked together to share a single depot and recruiting district in the United Kingdom, the 88th was linked with the 87th (Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot and assigned to district no. 68 at Renmore Barracks in Galway.

Lord William Paulet

PauletPaulet, Colonel Lord William
1863–1864: F.M. Lord William Paulet, GCB
Paulet was also colonel of the 87th Regiment of Foot and later of the 68th Light Infantry (1st Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry from 1881).

Thomas Henry Johnston (British Army officer)

Thomas Henry Johnston
1864–1870: Gen. Thomas Henry Johnston
He was the Colonel of the 87th (Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot from 1864 to 1870.

Hercules Robinson, 1st Baron Rosmead

Sir Hercules RobinsonHercules RobinsonHercules Robinson, Lord Rosmead
From the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, he was commissioned into the 87th Foot as a Second Lieutenant on 27 January 1843, he was promoted Lieutenant by purchase on 6 September 1844, and reached the rank of Captain.

Joseph Thomas (surveyor)

Joseph Thomas
In 1819, he was admitted to the Royal Military College, Sandhurst and in November 1822, he joined the 87th Regiment of Foot.

Faugh A Ballagh

Its first recorded use as a regimental motto was by the 87th (Prince of Wales's Irish) Regiment of Foot (who later became the Royal Irish Fusiliers) in 1798.

Royal Irish Regiment (1992)

Royal Irish RegimentThe Royal Irish RegimentThe Royal Irish Regiment (27th (Inniskilling), 83rd, 87th and Ulster Defence Regiment)
This originates from the Peninsular War, when Ensign Edward Keogh of the 87th Regiment of Foot let out the cry while capturing a French Imperial Eagle at the Battle of Barrosa.

Connell James Baldwin

In 1808, as an Ensign in the 87th Foot, he purchased a Lieutenancy in the 83rd Foot.

Thomas Noel Harris

Thomas Harris
Educated at Uppingham School, in 1801 he enlisted as an ensign in the 87th Regiment of Foot.

Arthur Fulcher

A.W.Fulcher
He was born at Pau, France, the second son of Captain Edward Fulcher of the 87th Royal Irish Fusiliers and educated at Westminster school.

I Corps (United Kingdom)

I Corps1st Army CorpsBritish I Corps
87th Foot (Limerick), West Kent Yeomanry (Maidstone), 22nd Company Royal Engineers (Woolwich)

Sir John McMahon, 1st Baronet

John McMahonCol. The Rt. Hon. Sir John McMahon, Bt.Private Secretary
McMahon was commissioned into the 44th Foot, and later transferred to the 48th Foot and the 87th Foot.

Edward Finch (British Army officer)

Edward FinchEdward Finch HattonThe Honorable Edward Finch
He joined the British Army as a cornet in the 11th Dragoons in 1778, soon transferring to the 20th Light Dragoons, and the following year was promoted lieutenant into the 87th Regiment of Foot.

John Dalrymple, 6th Earl of Stair

Viscount DalrympleJohnJohn Dalrymple, Viscount Dalrymple
As captain of the 87th Foot he served in the American War of Independence, taking part in the successful attack on New London, Connecticut and Fort Griswold in September 1781 under Sir Henry Clinton, who sent him home with despatches.