91st Aero Squadron

91st2d Lt Francis Lowry, the only Colorado pilot killed in World War I combat
The 91st Aero Squadron was a unit of the Air Service, United States Army that fought on the Western Front during World War I. The 91st was one of the first five American flying squadrons to reach France, arriving at Chaumont Hill 402 Aerodrome on 15 November 1917.wikipedia
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7th Operations Group

7th Bombardment GroupFirst Army Observation Group7th Bomb Group
They spent about a month at Chaumont where the squadron was engaged in construction activity at the base until receiving orders on 13 December for a move to Amanty Airdrome, where the 91st was assigned as an Observation squadron with the First Army Observation Group.
The group initially consisted of the 91st and 24th Aero Squadrons, which flew over the front into enemy territory.

Amanty Airdrome

They spent about a month at Chaumont where the squadron was engaged in construction activity at the base until receiving orders on 13 December for a move to Amanty Airdrome, where the 91st was assigned as an Observation squadron with the First Army Observation Group.
Later on 14 December, they were joined by the ground personnel of 91st Aero Squadron (their pilots still training in Issoudun – they would arrive in March 1918).

Gondreville-sur-Moselle Aerodrome

Aircraft was received for the next month, and on 24 May, the squadron was moved to the Gondreville-sur-Moselle Aerodrome for combat duty.
It was used by 91st Aero Squadron from late May 1918, working for the headquarters of the First Army Observation Group, providing long-range and strategic reconnaissance missions over enemy territory, especially during the St. Mihiel Offensive.

Kelly Field Annex

Kelly FieldKelly Air Force BaseKelly AFB
The current United States Air Force unit which holds its lineage and history is the 91st Cyberspace Operations Squadron, assigned to the 67th Cyberspace Wing, Kelly Field Annex, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas.

List of Air Service American Expeditionary Force aerodromes in France

Colombey-les-Belles AirdromeAmanty AerodromeChaumont Aerodrome
Finally in mid April, orders were received to move to the 1st Air Depot at Colombey-les-Belles Airdrome, at which all equipment would be turned in prior to departing France for the United States.

Vavincourt Aerodrome

Heavy rain beginning on the 16th kept the 91st on the ground for the next three days, and on 20 September the 91st was ordered to move to Vavincourt Aerodrome, with new orders to fly observation missions over the Verdun-Argonne sector in preparation for the planned Meuse-Argonne Offensive.

George Kenney

George C. KenneyGeneral George C. KenneyGeneral Kenney
On 22 March, Lt George Kenney was injured in a non-combat aircraft accident.
Kenney enlisted as a flying cadet in the Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps in 1917, and served on the Western Front with the 91st Aero Squadron.

Trier Air Base

Trier AirdromeTrier AirfieldAAF Station Trier
On 2 December, orders came to move on to Trier Airfield, on the Moselle, about sixty miles from Preutin.
Assigned to it were the 9th, 91st, 94th and 166th Aero Squadrons.

William Terry Badham

William T. Badham
On the 15th near Gorze a four plane patrol was attacked by six German Pfalz D.III aircraft; One enemy aircraft was shot down by observer William Terry Badham in aircraft flown by Lt. Kenny; Kenney and Badham received the Silver Star.
In May 1918, he transferred to the Air Service, United States Army, and was assigned to the First Army Air Service 91st Aero Squadron, an American observation unit flying Salmson 2A2s at Gondreville-sur-Moselle Aerodrome.

Souilly Aerodrome

By October 1918, Souilly Aerodrome had become one of the major American airfields near Verdun, and it saw units from the First Army Observation Group flying from Souilly, such as a detachment of 91st Aero Squadron for a few days from 16 October, and 186th Aero Squadron, which arrived on 29 October and stayed until 15 April 1919 when it became part of the Rhineland occupation forces.

Airco DH.4

Dayton-Wright DH-4de Havilland DH-4DH-4
What might have been a serious accident occurred when a De Havilland DH-4 landed at Trier, ran into a Fokker taxiing to take off.

Kingman Douglass

Capt. Kingman Douglass, DSC, 3 aerial victories
During World War I, Kingman Douglass served as a captain and pilot with the 91st Aero Squadron, the "Demon Chasers," engaged in aerial observation and photographic intelligence.

Western Front (World War I)

Western FrontFranceFrance and Flanders 1914–18
The 91st Aero Squadron was a unit of the Air Service, United States Army that fought on the Western Front during World War I.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarWorld War One
The 91st Aero Squadron was a unit of the Air Service, United States Army that fought on the Western Front during World War I.

Chaumont-sur-Aire Airdrome

Chaumont Hill 402 AerodromeChaumont Hill 402Chaumont-Hill 402 Aerodrome
The 91st was one of the first five American flying squadrons to reach France, arriving at Chaumont Hill 402 Aerodrome on 15 November 1917.

First United States Army

First ArmyU.S. First ArmyUnited States First Army
The squadron was assigned as an Army Observation Squadron, performing long-range, strategic reconnaissance over the entire length of the United States First Army sector of the Western Front in France.

Armistice of 11 November 1918

ArmisticeArmistice with Germany1918 Armistice with Germany
After the 1918 Armistice with Germany, the squadron was assigned to the United States Third Army as part of the Occupation of the Rhineland in Germany.

United States Army Central

Third ArmyThird United States ArmyU.S. Third Army
After the 1918 Armistice with Germany, the squadron was assigned to the United States Third Army as part of the Occupation of the Rhineland in Germany.

Occupation of the Rhineland

Allied occupation of the RhinelandArmy of Occupationoccupation forces in Germany
After the 1918 Armistice with Germany, the squadron was assigned to the United States Third Army as part of the Occupation of the Rhineland in Germany.