A-side and B-side

B-sidedouble A-sideB-sidesA-sideB sideb/wdouble A-sidedflip sideSide Abacked with
The terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 78, 45, and 331⁄3 rpm phonograph records, or cassettes, whether singles, extended plays (EPs), or long-playing (LP) records.wikipedia
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Single (music)

singlesingles7" single
The terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 78, 45, and 331⁄3 rpm phonograph records, or cassettes, whether singles, extended plays (EPs), or long-playing (LP) records.
That is to say, they were released with an A-side and B-side, on which two singles would be released, one on each side.

Remix

remixerremixesremixing
There are several types of material commonly released in this way, including a different version (e.g., instrumental, a cappella, live, acoustic, remixed version or in another language), or, in a concept record, a song that does not fit into the story line.

Phil Spector

Spector[Phil] SpectorAnnette Records
Others took the opposite approach: producer Phil Spector was in the habit of filling B-sides with on-the-spot instrumentals that no one would confuse with the A-side.
Ahmet Ertegün of Atlantic paired Spector with future Broadway star Jean DuShon for "Talk to Me", the B-side of which was "Tired of Trying", written by DuShon.

Vanilla Ice

Rob Van WinkleRobert Van WinkleRob “Vanilla Ice” Van Winkle
"Ice Ice Baby" by Vanilla Ice (originally the B-side of "Play That Funky Music"), "I'll Be Around" by the Spinners (originally the B-side of "How Could I Let You Get Away") and "Maggie May" by Rod Stewart (originally the B-side of "Reason to Believe").
"Play That Funky Music" was released as the album's first single, with "Ice Ice Baby" appearing as the B-side.

Phonograph cylinder

wax cylinderwax cylinderscylinder
The first sound recordings at the end of the 19th century were made on cylinder records, which had a single round surface capable of holding approximately two minutes of sound.
Virtually all US disc records were single-sided until 1908, when Columbia Records began mass production of discs with recordings pressed on both sides.

Acquiesce

The song "How Soon Is Now?" by the Smiths started out as the extra track on the 12-inch of William, It Was Really Nothing but later gained a separate release as an A-side in its own right, as did Oasis's "Acquiesce", which originally appeared as a B-side to "Some Might Say" in 1995, but gained subsequent release in 2006 as part of an EP to promote their forthcoming compilation album, Stop the Clocks.
The song originally appeared as a B-side to Oasis' first UK #1 single, "Some Might Say", on 24 April 1995.

Ice Ice Baby

Ice Ice AlvinIce Ice Baby (Zumba Remix)Ice, Ice Baby
"Ice Ice Baby" by Vanilla Ice (originally the B-side of "Play That Funky Music"), "I'll Be Around" by the Spinners (originally the B-side of "How Could I Let You Get Away") and "Maggie May" by Rod Stewart (originally the B-side of "Reason to Believe").
"Ice Ice Baby" was first released as the B-side to Vanilla Ice's cover of "Play That Funky Music", but the single was not initially successful.

Papa's Got a Brand New Bag

Papa's Got A Brand New Bag (Part 1)Papa's Got a Brand New Bag Part IPapa's Got a Brand New Bag, Pt. 1
Examples of this include Ray Charles's "What'd I Say", the Isley Brothers' "Shout", and a number of records by James Brown, including "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag" and "Say It Loud - I'm Black and I'm Proud".
An instrumental version of "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag" was released as the B-side of Brown's 1965 Smash single "Try Me".

Maggie May

1971 hit singleRod Stewart song of the same name
"Ice Ice Baby" by Vanilla Ice (originally the B-side of "Play That Funky Music"), "I'll Be Around" by the Spinners (originally the B-side of "How Could I Let You Get Away") and "Maggie May" by Rod Stewart (originally the B-side of "Reason to Believe").
The song was released as the B-side of the single "Reason to Believe", but soon radio stations began playing the B-side and "Maggie May" became the more popular side.

Day Tripper

Day Tripper (Live)Day Tripper (Beatles song)
In 1965, Billboard reported that due to a disagreement between EMI and John Lennon about which side of the Beatles' "We Can Work It Out" and "Day Tripper" single should be considered the A-side and receive the plugging, "EMI settled for a double-side promotion campaign—unique in Britain."
"Day Tripper" is a song by the English rock band the Beatles that was released as a double A-side single with "We Can Work It Out" in December 1965.

Strawberry Fields Forever

Strawberry Fieldsstrawberry field
They continued to use the format for the release of the singles "Eleanor Rigby" and "Yellow Submarine" in 1966, followed by "Strawberry Fields Forever" / "Penny Lane" in 1967, and "Something" / "Come Together" in 1969.
It was released on 13 February 1967 as a double A-side single with "Penny Lane".

Penny Lane

Beatles songFiremensong by the Beatles
They continued to use the format for the release of the singles "Eleanor Rigby" and "Yellow Submarine" in 1966, followed by "Strawberry Fields Forever" / "Penny Lane" in 1967, and "Something" / "Come Together" in 1969.
"Penny Lane" is a song by the English rock band the Beatles that was released in February 1967 as a double A-side single with "Strawberry Fields Forever".

Let's Spend the Night Together

Other groups followed suit, notably the Rolling Stones in early 1967 with "Let's Spend the Night Together" / "Ruby Tuesday" as a double-A single.
Released in the United Kingdom as a single on 13 January 1967, "Let's Spend the Night Together" reached number three on the UK Singles Chart as a double A-side with "Ruby Tuesday".

Album

studio albumlive albumtribute album
There are several types of material commonly released in this way, including a different version (e.g., instrumental, a cappella, live, acoustic, remixed version or in another language), or, in a concept record, a song that does not fit into the story line. However, the term "B-side" is still used to refer to the "bonus" tracks or "coupling" tracks on a CD single.
Albums have been issued that are compilations of older tracks not originally released together, such as singles not originally found on albums, b-sides of singles, or unfinished "demo" recordings.

We Can Work It Out

We Can
In 1965, Billboard reported that due to a disagreement between EMI and John Lennon about which side of the Beatles' "We Can Work It Out" and "Day Tripper" single should be considered the A-side and receive the plugging, "EMI settled for a double-side promotion campaign—unique in Britain."
It was first issued as a double A-side single with "Day Tripper" in December 1965.

Rock Around the Clock

(We're Gonna) Rock Around the ClockRock Around the Clock (Swing Cats Remix)(We’re Gonna) Rock Around the Clock
Probably the most well-known of these, however, is "Rock Around the Clock" by Bill Haley & His Comets (originally the B-side of "Thirteen Women (And Only One Man In Town))".
Once at the studio, producer Milt Gabler (uncle of actor Billy Crystal, who had produced Louis Jordan as well as Billie Holiday), insisted the band work on a song entitled "Thirteen Women (and Only One Man in Town)" (written and previously recorded by Dickie Thompson), which Gabler wanted to promote as the A-side of the group's first single for Decca.

Kraftwerk

Henning SchmitzEberhard KranemannStefan Pfaffe
For example, in 1981 Kraftwerk released their new single "Computer Love" coupled with the B-side "The Model", from their 1978 LP The Man-Machine.
Radio DJs were more interested in the B-side so the single was repackaged by EMI and re-released with "The Model" as the A-side.

Extended play

EPEPsextended plays
The terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 78, 45, and 331⁄3 rpm phonograph records, or cassettes, whether singles, extended plays (EPs), or long-playing (LP) records.
These extended-length singles became known as maxi singles and while commensurate in length to an EP were distinguished by being designed to feature a single song, with the remaining songs considered B-sides, whereas an EP was designed not to feature a single song, instead resembling a mini album.

Cliff Richard

Sir Cliff RichardCliff Richard & The ShadowsCliff Richard and the Shadows
Also, for Cliff Richard's 1962 "The Next Time"/"Bachelor Boy", both sides were marketed as songs with chart potential, albeit with "Bachelor Boy" pressed as the B-side.
Richard was permitted to record one of his own songs for the B-side; this was "Move It", written and composed by the Drifters' Samwell while he was on board a number 715 Green Line bus on the way to Richard's house for a rehearsal.

Stop the Clocks

Stop the Clocks EPcompilation of the same nameEP of the same name
The song "How Soon Is Now?" by the Smiths started out as the extra track on the 12-inch of William, It Was Really Nothing but later gained a separate release as an A-side in its own right, as did Oasis's "Acquiesce", which originally appeared as a B-side to "Some Might Say" in 1995, but gained subsequent release in 2006 as part of an EP to promote their forthcoming compilation album, Stop the Clocks.
Stop the Clocks focuses heavily on the band's first two albums, Definitely Maybe and (What's the Story) Morning Glory?, with each contributing five tracks, plus four B-sides (also included on the band's other compilation album The Masterplan) from this era.

Rape Me

Rape Me (Nirvana Song)
Nirvana released "All Apologies" and "Rape Me" as a double A-side in 1993, and both songs are accredited as a hit on both the UK Singles Chart, and the Irish Singles Chart.
The song was released as the second single from Nirvana's third album In Utero in 1993, packaged as a double A-side along with "All Apologies".

The Rolling Stones

Rolling StonesStonesthe Stones
Other groups followed suit, notably the Rolling Stones in early 1967 with "Let's Spend the Night Together" / "Ruby Tuesday" as a double-A single.
The Rolling Stones' fifth UK single, a cover of Willie Dixon's "Little Red Rooster"—with "Off the Hook", credited to Nanker Phelge, as the B-side—was released in November 1964 and became their second No.

These Are the Days of Our Lives

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It was also the UK Christmas No. 1 that year, one of only two occasions on which a double A-side has topped that chart, the other being Queen's 1991 re-release of "Bohemian Rhapsody" with "These Are the Days of Our Lives".
The song was released as a single in the United States on Freddie Mercury's 45th birthday, 5 September 1991, and as double A-side single in Ireland and the United Kingdom on 9 December, in the wake of Mercury's death, with the Queen track "Bohemian Rhapsody".

The Next Time

Also, for Cliff Richard's 1962 "The Next Time"/"Bachelor Boy", both sides were marketed as songs with chart potential, albeit with "Bachelor Boy" pressed as the B-side.
Both sides were marketed as songs with chart potential, and the release is viewed retrospectively as a double A-side single.

Ruby Tuesday (song)

Ruby TuesdayRuby Tuesday" (song)
Other groups followed suit, notably the Rolling Stones in early 1967 with "Let's Spend the Night Together" / "Ruby Tuesday" as a double-A single.
The song topped the American Billboard Hot 100 chart, while reaching number 3 in the UK's Record Retailer chart, which listed "Let's Spend The Night Together"/"Ruby Tuesday" as a double A-side.