A. J. P. Taylor

A.J.P. TaylorAJP TaylorTaylor, A.J.P.Taylor, A. J. P.A J P TaylorA.J.P TaylorAlan John Percival TaylorAlan Tayloresteemed historian of twentieth-century European politicsTaylor, A.J.P
Alan John Percivale Taylor (25 March 1906 – 7 September 1990) was a British historian who specialised in 19th- and 20th-century European diplomacy.wikipedia
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Magdalen College, Oxford

Magdalen CollegeMagdalenMagdalen College Oxford
He became a Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, in 1938, a post he held until 1976.
Magdalen's prominence since the mid-20th century owes much to such famous fellows as C. S. Lewis and A. J. P. Taylor, and its academic success to the work of such dons as Thomas Dewar Weldon.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
During the Second World War, Taylor served in the Home Guard and befriended émigré statesmen from Eastern Europe, such as the former Hungarian President Count Mihály Károlyi and Czechoslovak President Edvard Beneš.
Others follow the British historian A.J.P. Taylor, who held that the Sino-Japanese War and war in Europe and its colonies occurred simultaneously, and the two wars merged in 1941.

Labour Party (UK)

Labour PartyLabourBritish Labour Party
After leaving, he was an ardent supporter of the Labour Party for the rest of his life, remaining a member for over sixty years.
However many Labourites for years blamed their defeat on foul play (the Zinoviev letter), thereby according to A. J. P. Taylor misunderstanding the political forces at work and delaying needed reforms in the party.

The Struggle for Mastery in Europe 1848–1918

The Struggle for Mastery in Europe
In 1954 he published his masterpiece, The Struggle for Mastery in Europe 1848–1918 and followed it up with The Trouble Makers in 1957, a critical study of British foreign policy.
The Struggle for Mastery in Europe 1848–1918 is a scholarly history book by the English historian A. J. P. Taylor.

The Origins of the Second World War

the origins of World War II
In 1961, he published his most controversial book, The Origins of the Second World War, which earned him a reputation as a revisionist.
The Origins of the Second World War is a non-fiction book by the English historian A. J. P. Taylor, examining the causes of World War II.

Martin Gilbert

Sir Martin GilbertGilbert, MartinMartin John Gilbert
An important step in Taylor's "rehabilitation" was a festschrift organised in his honour by Martin Gilbert in 1965.
One of his tutors at Oxford was A. J. P. Taylor.

Diplomatic history

diplomaticHistory of International Relationsdiplomatic historian
However, Taylor's speciality was in Central European, British and diplomatic history.
The most notable exceptions to this tendency were A. J. P. Taylor and William Medlicott in Britain, Pierre Renouvin in France, and William L. Langer in the United States, who examined economic and domestic political forces.

The Course of German History

Moreover, in a partial break with his view of German history advocated in The Course of German History, he argued that Hitler was not just a normal German leader but also a normal Western leader.
The Course of German History is a non-fiction book by the English historian A. J. P. Taylor.

Edvard Beneš

BenešEduard BenešEduard Benes
During the Second World War, Taylor served in the Home Guard and befriended émigré statesmen from Eastern Europe, such as the former Hungarian President Count Mihály Károlyi and Czechoslovak President Edvard Beneš.
The British historian A. J. P. Taylor wrote: "Beneš, whatever his other defects, was an incomparable negotiator; and the talents which had been a match for Lloyd George in 1919, soon took Runciman's measure in 1938...Instead, Runciman found that he was being maneuvered into a position where he had to endorse the Czech offers as reasonable, and to condemn the obstinacy of the Sudetens, not of Beneš. An appalling consequence [for Britain] loomed ever nearer; if Beneš did all that Runciman asked of him, and more, Great Britain would be saddled with the moral obligation to support Czechoslovakia in the ensuring crisis. To avert this consequence, Runciman, far from urging Beneš on, had to preach delay. Beneš did not allow him to escape".

Bootham School

BoothamFriends' School, Bootham
These schools included The Downs School at Colwall and Bootham School in York.
Well known former pupils include the 19th-century parliamentary leader John Bright, mathematician Lewis Fry Richardson ("father of fractals"), historian A. J. P. Taylor, actor-manager Brian Rix, applied linguist Stephen Pit Corder, the leading child psychiatrist Sir Michael Rutter, the famous social reformer Seebohm Rowntree, the Nobel peace prize winner of 1959 Philip John Noel-Baker, Cabinet Secretary Sir Jeremy Heywood, singer-songwriter Benjamin Francis Leftwich and Chief Executive of Marks & Spencer, Stuart Rose.

Richard Overy

Overy, RichardOvery, R. J.R. J. Overy
His combination of academic rigour and popular appeal led the historian Richard Overy to describe him as "the Macaulay of our age".
His work on World War II has been praised as "highly effective (in) the ruthless dispelling of myths" (A. J. P. Taylor), "original and important" (New York Review of Books) and "at the cutting edge" (Times Literary Supplement.)

Dylan Thomas

DylanDylan and Caitlin Thomas,Dylan Marlais Thomas
Taylor lived for a while in Disley, Cheshire, where Dylan Thomas (who was his first wife's lover) was his guest; he later provided Thomas with a cottage in Oxford so that he could recover from a breakdown.
Thomas visited the home of historian A. J. P. Taylor in Disley.

Birkdale

Birkdale, Merseyside
Taylor was born in 1906 in Birkdale, Southport, which was then part of Lancashire.

Disley

Disley RDDisley Rural DistrictDisley Rural District Council
Taylor lived for a while in Disley, Cheshire, where Dylan Thomas (who was his first wife's lover) was his guest; he later provided Thomas with a cottage in Oxford so that he could recover from a breakdown.
British historian A.J.P. Taylor bought a house in Higher Disley in 1935, for £525, so he could be close to University of Manchester when he was lecturing.

Southport

Southport, EnglandSouthport, LancashireSouthport CB
Taylor was born in 1906 in Birkdale, Southport, which was then part of Lancashire.

University of North London

Polytechnic of North LondonNorth London PolytechnicNorthern Polytechnic
Moving to London, he became a lecturer at the Institute of Historical Research at University College London and also at the Polytechnic of North London.
After leaving Oxford in 1964, the renowned historian A. J. P. Taylor lectured at the Polytechnic until his death in 1990.

Ford Lectures

Ford's LecturerFord LecturerFord Lecture
The Trouble Makers had originally been the Ford Lectures in 1955 and was his favourite book by far.

History of the United Kingdom

United KingdomBritishUK History
However, Taylor's speciality was in Central European, British and diplomatic history.
A. J. P. Taylor argues most people "were enjoying a richer life than any previously known in the history of the world: longer holidays, shorter hours, higher real wages."

Otto von Bismarck

BismarckChancellor BismarckPrince Bismarck
He was especially interested in the Habsburg dynasty and Bismarck.
A. J. P. Taylor, a leading British diplomatic historian, concludes that, "Bismarck was an honest broker of peace; and his system of alliances compelled every Power, whatever its will, to follow a peaceful course."

Max Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook

Lord BeaverbrookMax AitkenBeaverbrook
In the 1950s and 1960s, Taylor befriended Lord Beaverbrook and later wrote his biography in 1972.
A. J. P. Taylor later wrote that Beaverbrook was a pathbreaker who "invented all the methods of publicity" used by Britain to promote the war, including the nation's first war artists, the first war photographers, and the first makers of war films.

Lewis Namier

Lewis Bernstein NamierNamierSir Lewis Namier
His main mentors in this period were the Austrian-born historian Alfred Francis Pribram and the Polish-born historian Sir Lewis Namier.
Although Namier was well known for his conservative political views, his principal protégé was the left-wing historian A. J. P. Taylor.

Fighter: The True Story of the Battle of Britain

Taylor also wrote the introduction for Fighter: The True Story of the Battle of Britain by Len Deighton.
Deighton was encouraged to write the book by his friend, the British historian A.J.P. Taylor, who wrote the introduction to Fighter.

Thirty-year rule

thirty year rule30-year rulefifty-year rule
In regard to government archives, Taylor took part in a successful attempt to lobby the British government to replace the 50-year rule with a 30-year rule.
Among those who had repeatedly urged the scrapping of the fifty-year rule was the historian A. J. P. Taylor.

Hugh Trevor-Roper

Trevor-Roper, HughHugh Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre of GlantonLord Dacre
Taylor had a famous rivalry with the historian Hugh Trevor-Roper, with whom he often debated on television.
Trevor-Roper attacked the philosophies of history advanced by Arnold J. Toynbee and E. H. Carr, as well as his colleague A. J. P. Taylor's account of the origins of World War II.

Historical revisionism

revisionistrevisionismhistorical revisionist
In 1961, he published his most controversial book, The Origins of the Second World War, which earned him a reputation as a revisionist.
British historian A. J. P. Taylor ignited a firestorm when he argued Hitler was a rather ordinary diplomat and did not deliberately set out to cause a war.