A report on ANSI escape code

Output of the system-monitor htop, an ncurses-application (which uses and other ANSI/ISO control sequences).
The DEC VT100 video display terminal.
The Xterm terminal emulator.
A 1980s Kaypro II, a CP/M-80 PC. It natively emulated ADM-3A and also supported a terminal mode (being demonstrated).
Output of example program on Gnome Terminal

ANSI escape sequences are a standard for in-band signaling to control cursor location, color, font styling, and other options on video text terminals and terminal emulators.

- ANSI escape code
Output of the system-monitor htop, an ncurses-application (which uses and other ANSI/ISO control sequences).

22 related topics with Alpha

Overall

The DEC VT100, a widely emulated computer terminal

Computer terminal

6 links

Electronic or electromechanical hardware device that can be used for entering data into, and transcribing data from, a computer or a computing system.

Electronic or electromechanical hardware device that can be used for entering data into, and transcribing data from, a computer or a computing system.

The DEC VT100, a widely emulated computer terminal
IBM 2741, a widely emulated computer terminal in the 1960s and 1970s (keyboard/printer)
A Teletype Model 33 ASR teleprinter, usable as a terminal
Closeup of an IBM 2741 printing terminal, which used a changeable Selectric "golfball" typing element and was faster than the earlier teletype machines
IBM 2250 Model 4, including light pen and programmed function keyboard
A Televideo ASCII character mode terminal
A typical text terminal produces input and displays output and errors
Nano text editor running in the xterm terminal emulator

The ANSI X3.64 escape code standard produced uniformity to some extent, but significant differences remained.

VT100

4 links

Video terminal, introduced in August 1978 by Digital Equipment Corporation .

Video terminal, introduced in August 1978 by Digital Equipment Corporation .

The VT101 was the lowest-cost member of the VT100 family
VT131 at the Living Computer Museum

It was one of the first terminals to support ANSI escape codes for cursor control and other tasks, and added a number of extended codes for special features like controlling the status lights on the keyboard.

xterm, a terminal emulator designed for the X Window System

Terminal emulator

3 links

Computer program that emulates a video terminal within some other display architecture.

Computer program that emulates a video terminal within some other display architecture.

xterm, a terminal emulator designed for the X Window System
Windows Terminal, an open-source terminal emulator for Windows 10 and Windows 11

Terminals usually support a set of escape sequences for controlling color, cursor position, etc. Examples include the family of terminal control sequence standards known as ECMA-48, ANSI X3.64 or ISO/IEC 6429.

Various ISO 2022 and other CJK encodings supported by Mozilla Firefox as of 2004. (This support has been reduced in later versions to avoid certain cross site scripting attacks.)

ISO/IEC 2022

4 links

ISO/IEC standard in the field of character encoding.

ISO/IEC standard in the field of character encoding.

Various ISO 2022 and other CJK encodings supported by Mozilla Firefox as of 2004. (This support has been reduced in later versions to avoid certain cross site scripting attacks.)
Relationship between ECMA-43 (ISO/IEC 4873) editions and levels, and EUC.

Specific sets of control codes and escape sequences designed to be used with ISO 2022 include ISO/IEC 6429, portions of which are implemented by ANSI.SYS and terminal emulators.

Control character

4 links

Code point (a number) in a character set, that does not represent a written symbol.

Code point (a number) in a character set, that does not represent a written symbol.

Several standards exist for these sequences, notably ANSI X3.64.

C0 and C1 control codes

3 links

The C0 and C1 control code or control character sets define control codes for use in text by computer systems that use ASCII and derivatives of ASCII.

The C0 and C1 control code or control character sets define control codes for use in text by computer systems that use ASCII and derivatives of ASCII.

C1 codes are the range 80HEX–9FHEX and the default C1 set was originally defined in ECMA-48 (harmonized later with ISO 6429).

Ecma International

1 links

Nonprofit standards organization for information and communication systems.

Nonprofit standards organization for information and communication systems.

ECMA-48 – Control Functions for Coded Character Sets, also approved as ISO/IEC 6429

Escape character

1 links

Escape character is a character that invokes an alternative interpretation on the following characters in a character sequence.

Escape character is a character that invokes an alternative interpretation on the following characters in a character sequence.

This was later developed to ANSI escape codes covered by the ANSI X3.64 standard.

Digital Equipment Corporation

2 links

Major American company in the computer industry from the 1960s to the 1990s.

Major American company in the computer industry from the 1960s to the 1990s.

Original Digital Equipment Corporation logo designed by Elliot Hendrickson in 1957, used from 1957 to 1993
DEC VAXstation
DECUS - Logo Digital Equipment Corporation Users Society

The VT100 computer terminal became the industry standard, implementing a useful subset of the ANSI X3.64 standard, and even today terminal emulators such as HyperTerminal, PuTTY and Xterm still emulate a VT100 (or its more capable successor, the VT220).

JIS X 0211

1 links

JIS X 0211, originally designated JIS C 6323 is a Japanese Industrial Standard defining C0 and C1 control codes and control sequences.