A report on Plain textUTF-16 and ASCII

Text file of The Human Side of Animals by Royal Dixon, displayed by the command in an xterm window
The first 216 Unicode code points. The stripe of solid gray near the bottom are the surrogate halves used by UTF-16 (the white region below the stripe is the Private Use Area)
ASCII chart from a pre-1972 printer manual
ASCII (1963). Control pictures of equivalent controls are shown where they exist, or a grey dot otherwise.

It is also sometimes used for plain text and word-processing data files on Microsoft Windows.

- UTF-16

In principle, plain text can be in any encoding, but occasionally the term is taken to imply ASCII.

- Plain text

As Unicode-based encodings such as UTF-8 and UTF-16 become more common, that usage may be shrinking.

- Plain text

UTF-16 is the only web-encoding incompatible with ASCII and never gained popularity on the web, where it is used by under 0.002% (little over 1 thousandth of 1 percent) of web pages.

- UTF-16

To simplify matters, plain text data streams, including files, on Multics used line feed (LF) alone as a line terminator.

- ASCII

While ASCII is limited to 128 characters, Unicode and the UCS support more characters by separating the concepts of unique identification (using natural numbers called code points) and encoding (to 8-, 16-, or 32-bit binary formats, called UTF-8, UTF-16, and UTF-32, respectively).

- ASCII
Text file of The Human Side of Animals by Royal Dixon, displayed by the command in an xterm window

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