A Boy Named Charlie Brown

A Boy Named Charlie Brown is a 1969 American animated comedy-drama film, produced by Cinema Center Films, distributed by National General Pictures, and directed by Bill Melendez, it is the first feature film based on the Peanuts comic strip.wikipedia
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Peter Robbins (actor)

Peter Robbins
It is also the final time that Peter Robbins voices the character of Charlie Brown (Robbins had voiced the role for all the Peanuts television specials up to that point, starting with the debut of the specials, A Boy Named Charlie Brown, in 1963), and it uses mostly the same voice cast from the 1969 TV special, It Was a Short Summer, Charlie Brown, except for replacing the voice actors of Sally and Schroeder.
Most distinctly, at the age of nine, Robbins provided Charlie Brown's voice in one television documentary, six Peanuts television specials and one movie from 1963–69, including the film A Boy Named Charlie Brown and the television specials A Charlie Brown Christmas and It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown.

National General Pictures

National GeneralNational General CorporationNational General label
A Boy Named Charlie Brown is a 1969 American animated comedy-drama film, produced by Cinema Center Films, distributed by National General Pictures, and directed by Bill Melendez, it is the first feature film based on the Peanuts comic strip.

Pamelyn Ferdin

Pam FerdinPamelyn Ferdin (or "Pamela Lynn")
Ferdin began her career in numerous television series, and gained renown for her work as a voice actress supplying the voice of Lucy Van Pelt in A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969), as well as in two other Peanuts television specials.

Cinema Center Films

Cinema Center 100Cinema Center 100 Productions
A Boy Named Charlie Brown is a 1969 American animated comedy-drama film, produced by Cinema Center Films, distributed by National General Pictures, and directed by Bill Melendez, it is the first feature film based on the Peanuts comic strip.

Charlie Brown

Peanuts'' character of the same namethe ''Peanuts'' character
It is also the final time that Peter Robbins voices the character of Charlie Brown (Robbins had voiced the role for all the Peanuts television specials up to that point, starting with the debut of the specials, A Boy Named Charlie Brown, in 1963), and it uses mostly the same voice cast from the 1969 TV special, It Was a Short Summer, Charlie Brown, except for replacing the voice actors of Sally and Schroeder.
On December 4, 1969, Charlie Brown starred on the first full-length animated feature based on Peanuts:'' A Boy Named Charlie Brown.

Peanuts

Peanuts WorldwideSnoopyCharlie Brown/Peanuts Specials
A Boy Named Charlie Brown is a 1969 American animated comedy-drama film, produced by Cinema Center Films, distributed by National General Pictures, and directed by Bill Melendez, it is the first feature film based on the Peanuts comic strip.
The first feature length film, A Boy Named Charlie Brown, came in 1969, and was one of four which were produced during the run of the strip.

Bill Melendez

Bill MeléndezJ.C. MelendezJ.C Melendez
A Boy Named Charlie Brown is a 1969 American animated comedy-drama film, produced by Cinema Center Films, distributed by National General Pictures, and directed by Bill Melendez, it is the first feature film based on the Peanuts comic strip. A Boy Named Charlie Brown, while directed and produced by the same team of Bill Melendez and Lee Mendelson, who were responsible for all the Peanuts television specials (Phil Roman directed later TV specials starting around the mid-1970s), has many different aspects that most of the specials did not explore in a visual sense.
"Schulz would not countenance the idea of a beagle uttering English dialogue, Mr. Melendez recited gibberish into a tape recorder, sped it up and put the result on the soundtrack.“ He also directed, did the animation for, and provided voice acting in the first four Peanuts theatrical films, A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969), Snoopy, Come Home (1972), Race for Your Life, Charlie Brown (1977), and Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown (1980), as well as the video games Get Ready for School, Charlie Brown! (1995) and Snoopy's Campfire Stories (1996). The last Peanuts-related production he worked on was He's a Bully, Charlie Brown (2006).

Linus van Pelt

Linus
Linus encourages him to maintain a positive attitude and suggests that people learn more from losing.
In the special A Boy Named Charlie Brown, it performed a complex dance routine with Linus upon being reunited with its owner.

Snoopy, Come Home

Snoopy Come HomeNo Dogs AllowedIt Changes
Snoopy, Come Home came three years later, in 1972, as a standalone sequel.
Guaraldi had composed all the previous Peanuts animated television specials as well as the debut film A Boy Named Charlie Brown.

List of minor characters in Peanuts

Eudora5Miss Othmar
Peppermint Patty and 5 also appear in silent roles.
In the 1966 strip storyline about Charlie Brown's competing in the class spelling bee (later adapted into the movie A Boy Named Charlie Brown), Charlie Brown mentions that his teacher's name is Mrs. Donovan, but he was later shown in Miss Othmar's class with Linus.

Vince Guaraldi

Vince Guaraldi TrioGuaraldiThe Vince Guaraldi Trio
The instrumental tracks interspersed throughout the movie were composed by Vince Guaraldi and arranged by John Scott Trotter (who also wrote "I Before E").
Guaraldi went on to compose scores for seventeen Peanuts television specials, as well as the 1969 feature film A Boy Named Charlie Brown and the unaired television program of the same name.

Rod McKuen

McKuenLove's Been Good to MeDor
A Boy Named Charlie Brown also included several original songs, some of which boasted vocals for the first time: "Failure Face", "I Before E" and "Champion Charlie Brown" (Before this film, musical pieces in Peanuts specials were primarily instrumental, except for a few traditional songs in A Charlie Brown Christmas.) Rod McKuen wrote and sang the title song.
His work as a composer in the film industry garnered him two Academy Award nominations for The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1969) and A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969), and his other film scores have included Joanna (1968), Me, Natalie (1969), Scandalous John (1971), The Borrowers (1973) and Emily (1976).

Shermy

Shermy is credited in the opening titles but doesn't have a speaking role.
Shermy is mentioned briefly in the musical You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown in the song "The Doctor Is In," but does not appear or have a speaking part; and he makes appearances in three feature films, including A Boy Named Charlie Brown, as well as a cameo appearance in Snoopy, Come Home.

Violet (Peanuts)

VioletViolet Gray
Linus, however, considers it a good idea and encourages him despite the jeers of Lucy, Violet, and Patty ("Failure Face").

Ingolf Dahl

DahlIngolf
A segment during the middle of the film, in which Schroeder plays Beethoven's Sonata Pathétique, had piano performed by Ingolf Dahl.
Dahl conducted the soundtrack to The Abductors (1957) by his pupil Paul Glass and performed the second movement of Beethoven's Pathétique Sonata in the 1969 animated film A Boy Named Charlie Brown.

Skippy Baxter

The segment during the "Skating" sequence was choreographed by American figure skater Skippy Baxter.
Baxter choreographed a segment for the 1969 animated film A Boy Named Charlie Brown, in which Snoopy skates.

I before E except after C

I Before EI Before E, Except After C
A Boy Named Charlie Brown also included several original songs, some of which boasted vocals for the first time: "Failure Face", "I Before E" and "Champion Charlie Brown" (Before this film, musical pieces in Peanuts specials were primarily instrumental, except for a few traditional songs in A Charlie Brown Christmas.) Rod McKuen wrote and sang the title song.
The rhyme is mentioned in several films and TV episodes about spelling bees, including A Boy Named Charlie Brown, The Simpsons episode "I'm Spelling as Fast as I Can", The Pen Is Mightier Than the Pencil episode of The Odd Couple (1970 TV series), and an episode of Arthur; and also in the musical The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, when Huck Finn is being taught how to read.

John Scott Trotter

The John Scott Trotter OrchestraJohn Scott Trotter OrchestraUncle John
The instrumental tracks interspersed throughout the movie were composed by Vince Guaraldi and arranged by John Scott Trotter (who also wrote "I Before E").
In 1970, Trotter was nominated for an Oscar award and a Grammy award for his musical score for the movie A Boy Named Charlie Brown.

Lee Mendelson Films

Lee Mendelson Film ProductionsMendelsonLee Mendelson Productions
Lee Mendelson Films is an animation studio situated in Burlingame, California and best known for Peanuts animated film productions including Snoopy, Come Home and A Boy Named Charlie Brown.

Piano Sonata No. 8 (Beethoven)

Piano Sonata No. 8Sonata PathétiquePathétique
A segment during the middle of the film, in which Schroeder plays Beethoven's Sonata Pathétique, had piano performed by Ingolf Dahl.
The complete movement was performed by Schroeder (actually played by Ingolf Dahl), set to animation, in the 1969 animated film A Boy Named Charlie Brown.

1983 in home video

1983
A Boy Named Charlie Brown was first released on VHS and Betamax in July 1983 through CBS/Fox Video, before seeing another VHS, Betamax, and LaserDisc release in 1984, then several more in 1985, February 20, 1992, and 1995 by CBS Home Entertainment through 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment, and May 29, 2001 through Paramount Home Entertainment, before making its Region 1 DVD debut in the original 1.85:1 anamorphic widescreen aspect ratio on March 28, 2006, by Paramount Home Entertainment/CBS Home Entertainment (co-producer Cinema Center Films was owned by CBS).

Academy Award for Best Original Score

Best Original ScoreBest Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy PictureAcademy Award for Original Music Score
The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song Score, but lost to The Beatles' Let It Be.

Phil Roman

Philip Roman
A Boy Named Charlie Brown, while directed and produced by the same team of Bill Melendez and Lee Mendelson, who were responsible for all the Peanuts television specials (Phil Roman directed later TV specials starting around the mid-1970s), has many different aspects that most of the specials did not explore in a visual sense.