A Century of Dishonor

A Century of Dishonor is a non-fiction book by Helen Hunt Jackson first published in 1881 that chronicled the experiences of Native Americans in the United States, focusing on injustices.wikipedia
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Helen Hunt Jackson

Helen HuntHelen Maria Hunt JacksonHelen H. Jackson
A Century of Dishonor is a non-fiction book by Helen Hunt Jackson first published in 1881 that chronicled the experiences of Native Americans in the United States, focusing on injustices.
She described the adverse effects of government actions in her history A Century of Dishonor (1881).

Ramona

the novel
However, it did not have quite the impact that Jackson wanted, which spurred her to write an emotional appeal to action in Ramona.
Jackson wrote Ramona three years after A Century of Dishonor, her non-fiction study of the mistreatment of Native Americans in the United States.

Nez Perce people

Nez PerceNez Perce tribeNez Perce Indian Reservation
The seven chapters that follow the introduction each describe the general history of the Delaware, the Cheyenne, the Nez Percé, the Sioux, the Ponca, the Winnebagoes, and the Cherokee, as well as the way their cultures shaped the way the United States took advantage of them.
Helen Hunt Jackson, author of "A Century of Dishonor", written in 1889 refers to the Nez Perce as "the richest, noblest, and most gentle" of Indian peoples as well as the most industrious.

Nonfiction

non-fictionnon-fiction bookNon Fiction
A Century of Dishonor is a non-fiction book by Helen Hunt Jackson first published in 1881 that chronicled the experiences of Native Americans in the United States, focusing on injustices.

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
A Century of Dishonor is a non-fiction book by Helen Hunt Jackson first published in 1881 that chronicled the experiences of Native Americans in the United States, focusing on injustices.

Indian Appropriations Act

Indian Appropriations Act of 1871Indian Appropriations Act of 1889Appropriation Bill for Indian Affairs
Jackson wrote A Century of Dishonor in an attempt to change government ideas/policy toward Native Americans at a time when effects of the 1871 Indian Appropriations Act (making the entire Native American population wards of the nation) had begun to draw the attention of the public.

Standing Bear

Standing Bear v. CrookChief Standing Bear1879 trial
Jackson attended a meeting in Boston in 1879 at which Standing Bear, a Ponca, told how the federal government forcibly removed his tribe from its ancestral homeland in the wake of the creation of the Great Sioux Reservation.

Ponca

Ponca peoplePonca tribeOmaha-Ponca
The seven chapters that follow the introduction each describe the general history of the Delaware, the Cheyenne, the Nez Percé, the Sioux, the Ponca, the Winnebagoes, and the Cherokee, as well as the way their cultures shaped the way the United States took advantage of them. Jackson attended a meeting in Boston in 1879 at which Standing Bear, a Ponca, told how the federal government forcibly removed his tribe from its ancestral homeland in the wake of the creation of the Great Sioux Reservation.

Great Sioux Reservation

Sioux Reservation
Jackson attended a meeting in Boston in 1879 at which Standing Bear, a Ponca, told how the federal government forcibly removed his tribe from its ancestral homeland in the wake of the creation of the Great Sioux Reservation.

Astor Library

AstorAstor Public Library
After meeting Standing Bear, she conducted research at the Astor Library in New York and was shocked by the story of government mistreatment that she found.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
Jackson sent a copy of her book to every member of Congress, at her own expense.

Praying Indian

Praying IndiansCaughnawaga IndiansCaughnawaga
Among the incidents it depicts is the eradication of Praying Town Indians in the colonial period, despite their recent conversion to Christianity, because it was assumed that all Indians were the same.

Christianity

ChristianChristiansChristian faith
Among the incidents it depicts is the eradication of Praying Town Indians in the colonial period, despite their recent conversion to Christianity, because it was assumed that all Indians were the same.

Minneapolis

Minneapolis, MinnesotaMinneapolis, MNCity of Minneapolis
Long out of print, A Century of Dishonor was first reprinted in 1964 by Ross & Haines of Minneapolis, Minnesota via a limited printing of 2,000 copies, and has been reprinted numerous times since then.

Lenape

DelawareLenni LenapeDelaware Indians
The seven chapters that follow the introduction each describe the general history of the Delaware, the Cheyenne, the Nez Percé, the Sioux, the Ponca, the Winnebagoes, and the Cherokee, as well as the way their cultures shaped the way the United States took advantage of them.

Cheyenne

CheyennesCheyenne IndiansCheyenne people
The seven chapters that follow the introduction each describe the general history of the Delaware, the Cheyenne, the Nez Percé, the Sioux, the Ponca, the Winnebagoes, and the Cherokee, as well as the way their cultures shaped the way the United States took advantage of them.

Sioux

DakotaSioux IndianSiouan
The seven chapters that follow the introduction each describe the general history of the Delaware, the Cheyenne, the Nez Percé, the Sioux, the Ponca, the Winnebagoes, and the Cherokee, as well as the way their cultures shaped the way the United States took advantage of them.

Ho-Chunk

WinnebagoWinnebagosWinnebago Indians
The seven chapters that follow the introduction each describe the general history of the Delaware, the Cheyenne, the Nez Percé, the Sioux, the Ponca, the Winnebagoes, and the Cherokee, as well as the way their cultures shaped the way the United States took advantage of them.

Cherokee

Cherokee IndiansCherokee peopleCherokees
The seven chapters that follow the introduction each describe the general history of the Delaware, the Cheyenne, the Nez Percé, the Sioux, the Ponca, the Winnebagoes, and the Cherokee, as well as the way their cultures shaped the way the United States took advantage of them.

Paxton Boys

Conestoga MassacrePaxton RiotsKillings by the Paxton Boys
Having shared the legal and cultural trouble that the aforementioned tribes experienced at the hands of the United States, Jackson goes on to provide detailed descriptions of three massacres: The Conestoga Massacre, the Gnadenhütten Massacre, and the Massacres of Apaches, as a demonstration of the violence committed against Native Americans.

Gnadenhutten massacre

Gnadenhütten massacreGnadenhuttenGnadenhütten
Having shared the legal and cultural trouble that the aforementioned tribes experienced at the hands of the United States, Jackson goes on to provide detailed descriptions of three massacres: The Conestoga Massacre, the Gnadenhütten Massacre, and the Massacres of Apaches, as a demonstration of the violence committed against Native Americans.

Second-wave feminism

second wave feminismsecond-wave feministsecond wave
Inspired by the women’s movement of the 1970s, it was not until the 1980s that more extensive attention to Jackson and others like her began to appear in academic journals.

Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy RooseveltPresident Theodore RooseveltRoosevelt
Initially, some critics, including President Theodore Roosevelt, dismissed her as being a "sentimental historian," which he did in the first appendix to The Winning of the West. However, more than a century later, historian John Milton Cooper countered Roosevelt's dismissal of Jackson's argument by stating that Roosevelt's view of Native American history was, "Eurocentric, racist, male dominated, and environmentally obtuse from a late twentieth century point of view."

John M. Cooper (historian)

Cooper, John MiltonJohn Milton CooperJohn Milton Cooper, Jr.
Initially, some critics, including President Theodore Roosevelt, dismissed her as being a "sentimental historian," which he did in the first appendix to The Winning of the West. However, more than a century later, historian John Milton Cooper countered Roosevelt's dismissal of Jackson's argument by stating that Roosevelt's view of Native American history was, "Eurocentric, racist, male dominated, and environmentally obtuse from a late twentieth century point of view."

Dawes Act

allotmentDawes Allotment ActDawes Act of 1887
The Dawes Act was born out of Jackson's efforts and called for the return of Native lands to Native Americans in an act of humanitarian reform.