A Letter to a Hindu

Letter to a Hindu
"A Letter to a Hindu" (also known as "A Letter to a Hindoo") was a letter written by Leo Tolstoy to Tarak Nath Das on 14 December 1908.wikipedia
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Leo Tolstoy

TolstoyLev TolstoyTolstoi
"A Letter to a Hindu" (also known as "A Letter to a Hindoo") was a letter written by Leo Tolstoy to Tarak Nath Das on 14 December 1908.
He later instilled the concept in Mahatma Gandhi through his A Letter to a Hindu when young Gandhi corresponded with him seeking his advice.

Mahatma Gandhi

GandhiMohandas GandhiMohandas Karamchand Gandhi
The letter caused the young Mohandas Gandhi to write to the world-famous Tolstoy to ask for advice and for permission to reprint the Letter in Gandhi's own South African newspaper, Indian Opinion, in 1909. Mahatma Gandhi (1929) The Story of My Experiments with Truth
According to Anthony Parel, Gandhi was also influenced by the Tamil text Tirukkuṛaḷ because Leo Tolstoy mentioned it in their correspondence that began with "A Letter to a Hindu".

The Kingdom of God Is Within You

This letter, along with Tolstoy's views, preaching, and his book The Kingdom of God Is Within You, helped to form Mohandas Gandhi's views about nonviolent resistance.
In 1908 Tolstoy wrote, and Gandhi read, A Letter to a Hindu, which outlines the notion that only by using love as a weapon through passive resistance could the native Indian people overthrow the colonial British Empire.

Tirukkuṛaḷ

KuralKural literatureThirukkural
The letter introduced Gandhi to the ancient Tamil moral literature, the Tirukkuṛaḷ, which Tolstoy referred to as the Hindu Kural.
Leo Tolstoy was inspired by the concept of non-violence found in the Kural when he read a German version of the book, who in turn instilled the concept in Mahatma Gandhi through his A Letter to a Hindu when young Gandhi sought his guidance.

Philosophy of war

cause of warphilosophicaltheory of war
Tolstoy's Christian-centered philosophy of war (especially his essays "A Letter to a Hindu" and "The Kingdom of God is Within You") was a direct influence on Gandhi's Hinduism-centered non-violent resistance philosophy.

Praise of Tirukkural

''"We may not all be aware even of the name of Sage Thiruvalluvar. North Indian people certainly do not know his name. Few saints have given to the people as much knowledge as he has done in the minimum of words." (Mahatma Gandhi, Indian nationalist, 1869–1948) Note: Mahatma Gandhi took to studying Tirukkural in prison after he learnt about the work from Leo Tolstoy through the latter's letter A Letter to a Hindu''.

Peace movement

peace activistpeaceantiwar movement
In 1908 Tolstoy wrote A Letter to a Hindu, which said that only by using love as a weapon through passive resistance could the Indian people overthrow colonial rule.

Aram (Kural book)

AramBook of VirtueBook I
Tolstoy, in turn, instilled the virtue of non-violence in Mohandas Gandhi through his A Letter to a Hindu when young Gandhi sought his advice on the struggle for Indian Independence.

Peace News

Peace News (UK)
Letter to a Hindu by Leo Tolstoy (Reprint), 1963.

Tarak Nath Das

Das, Taraknath
"A Letter to a Hindu" (also known as "A Letter to a Hindoo") was a letter written by Leo Tolstoy to Tarak Nath Das on 14 December 1908.

Russians

Russianethnic RussianRussian people
The letter was written in response to two letters sent by Das, seeking support from the famous Russian author and thinker for India's independence from British colonial rule.

Indian Opinion

The letter caused the young Mohandas Gandhi to write to the world-famous Tolstoy to ask for advice and for permission to reprint the Letter in Gandhi's own South African newspaper, Indian Opinion, in 1909.

Gujarati language

GujaratiGujratiGujurati
He then translated the letter himself, from the original English copy sent to India, into his native Gujarati.

Nonviolence

nonviolentnon-violencenon-violent
Tolstoy saw the law of love espoused in all the world's religions, and he argued that the individual, nonviolent application of the law of love in the form of protests, strikes, and other forms of peaceful resistance were the only alternative to violent revolution.

Protest

protestspolitical protestprotester
Tolstoy saw the law of love espoused in all the world's religions, and he argued that the individual, nonviolent application of the law of love in the form of protests, strikes, and other forms of peaceful resistance were the only alternative to violent revolution.

Strike action

strikestrikeslabor strike
Tolstoy saw the law of love espoused in all the world's religions, and he argued that the individual, nonviolent application of the law of love in the form of protests, strikes, and other forms of peaceful resistance were the only alternative to violent revolution.

Indian independence movement

Indian independenceindependencefreedom fighter
These ideas ultimately proved to be successful in 1947 in the culmination of the Indian Independence Movement.

Swami Vivekananda

VivekanandaSwami VivekanandVivekanand
In this letter, Tolstoy mentions the works of Swami Vivekananda.

Tamil language

TamilTamil-languageta
The letter introduced Gandhi to the ancient Tamil moral literature, the Tirukkuṛaḷ, which Tolstoy referred to as the Hindu Kural.

Sacred language

liturgical languageliturgicalritual language
The letter introduced Gandhi to the ancient Tamil moral literature, the Tirukkuṛaḷ, which Tolstoy referred to as the Hindu Kural.

Christian anarchism

Christian anarchistChristian anarchistsanarchist
Christian anarchism

The Story of My Experiments with Truth

autobiographyMy Autobiography, Or The Story Of My Experiments With TruthAn Autobiography
Mahatma Gandhi (1929) The Story of My Experiments with Truth