A Life for the Tsar

Ivan SusaninIwan SussaninIvan SoussanineLife for the Tsarof the same name“Ivan Susanin”
A Life for the Tsar ("Жизнь за царя", Zhizn' za tsarya), is a "patriotic-heroic tragic opera" in four acts with an epilogue by Mikhail Glinka.wikipedia
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Nestor Kukolnik

The original Russian libretto, based on historical events, was written by Nestor Kukolnik, Egor Fyodorovich (von) Rozen, Vladimir Sollogub and Vasily Zhukovsky.
Today, he is best remembered for having contributed to the libretto of the first Russian opera, A Life for the Tsar by Mikhail Glinka.

Ivan Susanin

Iwan Sussanin
During the Soviet era the opera was known under the name Ivan Susanin .
He was officially promoted as a national hero, and commemorated in poems and operas, such as Mikhail Glinka's A Life for the Tsar.

Catterino Cavos

The plot of A Life for the Tsar had been used earlier in 1815, when Catterino Cavos, an Italian-Russian composer, had written a two-act singspiel with the same subject and title.
Cavos is celebrated in Russian musical history as the man who composed the opera Ivan Susanin in 1815, 20 years before Mikhail Glinka's opera of the same name.

Mikhail Glinka

GlinkaGlinka AwardM. Glinka
is a "patriotic-heroic tragic opera" in four acts with an epilogue by Mikhail Glinka.
Although his initial fondness for her was said to have inspired the trio in the first act of opera A Life for the Tsar (1836), his naturally sweet disposition coarsened under the constant nagging of his wife and her mother.

Bolshoi Theatre, Saint Petersburg

Bolshoi TheatreImperial Bolshoi Kamenny TheatreBolshoi (Kamenny) Theatre
It premiered on 27 November 1836 OS (9 December NS) at the Bolshoi Kamenny Theatre in St. Petersburg.
It was there that the first Russian operas — Glinka's A Life for the Tsar and Ruslan and Lyudmila — were premiered.

Opera

opera singeroperasoperatic
is a "patriotic-heroic tragic opera" in four acts with an epilogue by Mikhail Glinka.
However, the real birth of Russian opera came with Mikhail Glinka and his two great operas A Life for the Tsar (1836) and Ruslan and Lyudmila (1842).

Mariinsky Theatre

MariinskyImperial Mariinsky TheatreKirov
It was performed in a gala performance at Marinsky Theatre, Performances of A Life for the Tsar was staged throughout Imperial Russia by schools, regiments and amateur companies.
With a seating capacity of 1,625 and a U-shaped Italian-style auditorium, the theatre opened on 2 October 1860, with a performance of A Life for the Tsar.

Romanov Tercentenary

300th anniversary of the Romanov dynastyTercentenary300th anniversary of the Romanov family
Glinka's play was featured heavily throughout the Romanov tercentenary celebrations.
At Marinsky Theatre, a gala performance of Glinka's A Life for the Tsar was held, which had featured prominently during the jubilee.

Rogneda (opera)

Rogneda
Most importantly, this opera laid the foundation for the series of Russian nationalistic historical operas continued by works such as Serov's Rogneda, Mussorgsky's Boris Godunov, Rimsky-Korsakov's Maid of Pskov, Tchaikovsky's The Oprichnik or Mazeppa, and Borodin's Prince Igor.
This opera forms a sequel of sorts to Alexey Verstovsky's highly successful singspiel, Askold's Grave, which premiered in 1835, just the year before Glinka's A Life for the Tsar reached the stage.

Prince Igor

Composition historyeponymous operaKhan Konchak
Most importantly, this opera laid the foundation for the series of Russian nationalistic historical operas continued by works such as Serov's Rogneda, Mussorgsky's Boris Godunov, Rimsky-Korsakov's Maid of Pskov, Tchaikovsky's The Oprichnik or Mazeppa, and Borodin's Prince Igor.
The idea of a choral epilogue in the original scenario was no doubt inspired by the example of A Life for the Tsar by Mikhail Glinka, to whose memory Prince Igor is dedicated.

Mariya Stepanova

Maria Stepanova
Mariya Matveyevna Stepanova (Russian: Мария Матвеевна Степанова) (1811 or 1816 – 1903) was a Russian opera singer who created the leading soprano roles in A Life for the Tsar, Ruslan and Lyudmila, and Dmitry Donskoy.

Modest Mussorgsky

MussorgskyMoussorgskyModest Moussorgsky
Most importantly, this opera laid the foundation for the series of Russian nationalistic historical operas continued by works such as Serov's Rogneda, Mussorgsky's Boris Godunov, Rimsky-Korsakov's Maid of Pskov, Tchaikovsky's The Oprichnik or Mazeppa, and Borodin's Prince Igor.
In 1859, the 20-year-old gained valuable theatrical experience by assisting in a production of Glinka's opera A Life for the Tsar on the Glebovo estate of a former singer and her wealthy husband; he also met Konstantin Lyadov (father of Anatoly Lyadov) and enjoyed a formative visit to Moscow – after which he professed a love of "everything Russian".

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov

Rimsky-KorsakovNikolay Rimsky-KorsakovRimsky Korsakov
Most importantly, this opera laid the foundation for the series of Russian nationalistic historical operas continued by works such as Serov's Rogneda, Mussorgsky's Boris Godunov, Rimsky-Korsakov's Maid of Pskov, Tchaikovsky's The Oprichnik or Mazeppa, and Borodin's Prince Igor. 1907, new edition by Rimsky-Korsakov and Glazunov, Belyayev, Leipzig
This statement was not true for Glinka, who studied Western music theory assiduously with Siegfried Dehn in Berlin before he composed his opera A Life for the Tsar.

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

TchaikovskyPyotr TchaikovskyPeter Tchaikovsky
Most importantly, this opera laid the foundation for the series of Russian nationalistic historical operas continued by works such as Serov's Rogneda, Mussorgsky's Boris Godunov, Rimsky-Korsakov's Maid of Pskov, Tchaikovsky's The Oprichnik or Mazeppa, and Borodin's Prince Igor.
Otherwise, it was to composers of the past that Tchaikovsky turned—Beethoven, whose music he respected; Mozart, whose music he loved; Glinka, whose opera A Life for the Tsar made an indelible impression on him as a child and whose scoring he studied assiduously; and Adolphe Adam, whose ballet Giselle was a favorite of his from his student days and whose score he consulted while working on The Sleeping Beauty.

Boris Godunov (opera)

Boris Godunovopera of the same nameBoris Gudonov
Most importantly, this opera laid the foundation for the series of Russian nationalistic historical operas continued by works such as Serov's Rogneda, Mussorgsky's Boris Godunov, Rimsky-Korsakov's Maid of Pskov, Tchaikovsky's The Oprichnik or Mazeppa, and Borodin's Prince Igor.
Mikhail Glinka: A Life for the Tsar (1836), Ruslan and Ludmila (1842)

Krakowiak

cracovienne
Dance: Krakowiak, Краковяк
In Russia a krakowiak was featured in Mikhail Glinka's A Life for the Tsar (1836) and, ever since, became an identifiable symbol of Poles and Polish culture in the Russian Empire, especially due to the rogatywka hat.

Elena Zaremba

Zaremba
1992, Alexander Lazarev (Conductor), Bolshoi Theatre Orchestra and Chorus, Evgeny Nesterenko (Susanin), Marina Mescheriakova (Antonida), Alexander Lomonosov (Sobinin), Elena Zaremba (Vanya), Boris Bezhko (Polish Voivode). Kultur/NVC Arts DVD
On the company's 1989 tour to La Scala she made her Western debut as Vanya in A Life for the Tsar.

Boris Christoff

Boris Hristov
1957, Igor Markevitch (Conductor), Artistes et Choeurs de l'Opera de Belgrade (Chef des Choeurs: Oscar Danon); Orchestre de l'Association des Concerts Lamoureux; Boris Christoff (Susanin); Teresa Stich-Randall (Antonida); Nicolai Gedda (Sobinin); Mela Bugarinovitch (Vania). Recorded in Paris on 26 November through 18 December 1957.
Among his most famous roles were those of Tsar Boris (Mussorgsky - Boris Godunov), Philip II (Verdi - Don Carlo), Mephistopheles (Gounod - Faust and Boito - Mefistofele), Ivan Susanin (Glinka - A Life for the Tsar), Zaccaria (Verdi - Nabucco), Tsar Ivan (Rimsky-Korsakov - Ivan the Terrible), Dosifei (Mussorgsky - Khovanshchina), Gomez da Silva (Verdi - Ernani), Fiesco (Verdi - Simon Boccanegra), Attila (Verdi - Attila), Padre Guardiano (Verdi - La forza del destino), Galitzky and Kontchak (Borodin - Prince Igor) and others.

Emil Tchakarov

1989, Emil Tchakarov (Conductor), Sofia National Opera Chorus (chorus masters: Lyubomir Karoleev and Hristo Kazandjiev); Sofia Festival Orchestra; Boris Martinovich (Susanin); Alexandrina Pendachanska (Antonida); Chris Merritt (Sobinin); Stefania Toczyska (Vanya); Stoil Georgiev (Commander of the Polish detachment); Mincho Popov (Polish messenger); Konstantin Videv (Commander of the Russian detachment). Recorded in Sofia (Hall 1, National Palace of Culture) on 9–15 September 1989.
Mikhail Glinka: A Life for the Tsar with Boris Martinovich, Chris Merritt, Stefania Toczyska, Alexandrina Pendachanska, Sofia Festival Orchestra.

Russian language

RussianRussian-languageRussian:
The original Russian libretto, based on historical events, was written by Nestor Kukolnik, Egor Fyodorovich (von) Rozen, Vladimir Sollogub and Vasily Zhukovsky.

Libretto

librettistlibrettibook
The original Russian libretto, based on historical events, was written by Nestor Kukolnik, Egor Fyodorovich (von) Rozen, Vladimir Sollogub and Vasily Zhukovsky.

Vladimir Sollogub

Vladimir Alexandrovich Sollogub
The original Russian libretto, based on historical events, was written by Nestor Kukolnik, Egor Fyodorovich (von) Rozen, Vladimir Sollogub and Vasily Zhukovsky.

Vasily Zhukovsky

ZhukovskyVasily Andreyevich ZhukovskyV. A. Zhukovsky
The original Russian libretto, based on historical events, was written by Nestor Kukolnik, Egor Fyodorovich (von) Rozen, Vladimir Sollogub and Vasily Zhukovsky.

Saint Petersburg

LeningradSt. PetersburgPetrograd
It premiered on 27 November 1836 OS (9 December NS) at the Bolshoi Kamenny Theatre in St. Petersburg.