A Rake's Progress

Rake's ProgressAHogarthian progressThe Rake's Progress
A Rake's Progress (or The Rake's Progress) is a series of eight paintings by 18th-century English artist William Hogarth.wikipedia
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William Hogarth

HogarthHogarthianHogarth, William
A Rake's Progress (or The Rake's Progress) is a series of eight paintings by 18th-century English artist William Hogarth.
His work ranges from realistic portraiture to comic strip-like series of pictures called "modern moral subjects", He is perhaps best known for his series A Harlot's Progress, A Rake's Progress and Marriage A-la-Mode.

Rake (stock character)

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The series shows the decline and fall of Tom Rakewell, the spendthrift son and heir of a rich merchant, who comes to London, wastes all his money on luxurious living, prostitution and gambling, and as a consequence is imprisoned in the Fleet Prison and ultimately Bethlem Hospital (Bedlam).
The rake became the butt of moralistic tales, in which his typical fate was debtor's prison, venereal disease, or, in the case of William Hogarth's A Rake's Progress, insanity in Bedlam.

Spendthrift

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The series shows the decline and fall of Tom Rakewell, the spendthrift son and heir of a rich merchant, who comes to London, wastes all his money on luxurious living, prostitution and gambling, and as a consequence is imprisoned in the Fleet Prison and ultimately Bethlem Hospital (Bedlam).
William Hogarth's A Rake's Progress (1732–33) displays in a series of paintings the spiralling fortunes of a wealthy but spendthrift son and heir who loses his money, and who as a consequence is imprisoned in the Fleet Prison and ultimately Bedlam.

Sir John Soane's Museum

Soane MuseumSir John Soane MuseumMuseum
The original paintings are in the collection of Sir John Soane's Museum in London, where they are normally on display for a short period each day.
Soane's paintings include: works by Canaletto entitled View of the Riva degli Schiavoni painted (1736) purchased in 1806 from William Thomas Beckford for 150 Guineas plus three other works by the artist, and paintings by Hogarth: the eight canvases of the A Rake's Progress, purchased from the collection of William Thomas Beckford, at auction for 570 Guineas in 1801, the other Hogarth paintings Soane purchased were the four canvases of the Humours of an Election bought at auction at Christie's from David Garrick's widow for £1,732, 10s in June 1823.

St Marylebone Parish Church

St Marylebone ChurchMarylebone ChurchSt Marylebone
In the fifth, Tom attempts to salvage his fortune by marrying a rich but aged and ugly old maid at St Marylebone.
It was in this church Francis Bacon was married in 1606, and its interior was portrayed by William Hogarth in the marriage scene from his famous series "A Rake's Progress" (1735).

Levee (ceremony)

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In the second painting, Tom is at his morning levée in London, attended by musicians and other hangers-on all dressed in expensive costumes.
The second scene of William Hogarth's A Rake's Progress shows a male equivalent in 1730s London.

The Rake's Progress

The Rake’s Progress1951 operatic treatmentAnne Truelove
Igor Stravinsky's 1951 opera The Rake's Progress, with a libretto by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman, is loosely based on the story from Hogarth's paintings.
The libretto, written by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman, is based loosely on the eight paintings and engravings A Rake's Progress (1733–1735) of William Hogarth, which Stravinsky had seen on 2 May 1947, in a Chicago exhibition.

The Rake's Progress (film)

The Rake's ProgressNotorious Gentleman
The 1945 British comedy-drama film The Rake's Progress, released in the US as Notorious Gentleman, is loosely based on the paintings.
The plot diverges from the theme of the Rake's Progress paintings by having him redeem himself by a hero's death in World War II.

The Rake's Progress (ballet)

The Rake's Progress
Gavin Gordon composed a 1935 ballet titled The Rake's Progress, based directly on Hogarth's paintings.
Gordon based his scenario for the ballet on Hogarth's series of paintings called A Rake's Progress.

Bedlam (film)

BedlamBedlam'' (film)
The 1946 RKO film Bedlam, produced by Val Lewton and directed by Mark Robson, was inspired by A Rake's Progress.
The film was inspired by William Hogarth's A Rake's Progress, and Hogarth was given a writing credit.

Gavin Gordon (composer)

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon composed a 1935 ballet titled The Rake's Progress, based directly on Hogarth's paintings.
More lasting fame, however, was accorded to The Rake's Progress (1935), based on the sequence of seven pictures by William Hogarth known as A Rake's Progress.

Henry Hudson (artist)

Henry Hudson
The British artist Henry Hudson depicted the rake in his 2015 show at the Sotheby's S2 gallery.
The exhibition consisted of ten large scale Plasticine paintings, depicting a contemporary version of William Hogarth's A Rake's Progress.

A Harlot's Progress

Harlot's ProgressThe Harlot's ProgressHarlot’s Progress
*A Harlot's Progress
Soon after, Hogarth published his second series of satirical and moralistic images, A Rake's Progress, followed ten years later by Marriage à-la-mode.

Grayson Perry

Perry, Grayson
In 2012, English artist Grayson Perry created a series of tapestries named The Vanity of Small Differences, an adaptation of Hogarth's originals.
Perry's 2012 TV documentary series All In The Best Possible Taste with Grayson Perry, about class "taste" variables, included him making large tapestries, called The Vanity of Small Differences. Their format was inspired by William Hogarth's A Rake's Progress. Of the tapestries, Perry says,

Prison

jailgaolpenitentiary
The series shows the decline and fall of Tom Rakewell, the spendthrift son and heir of a rich merchant, who comes to London, wastes all his money on luxurious living, prostitution and gambling, and as a consequence is imprisoned in the Fleet Prison and ultimately Bethlem Hospital (Bedlam).

Fleet Prison

Fleetthe Fleetbelow
The series shows the decline and fall of Tom Rakewell, the spendthrift son and heir of a rich merchant, who comes to London, wastes all his money on luxurious living, prostitution and gambling, and as a consequence is imprisoned in the Fleet Prison and ultimately Bethlem Hospital (Bedlam).

Bethlem Royal Hospital

BedlamBethlem HospitalBethlem
The series shows the decline and fall of Tom Rakewell, the spendthrift son and heir of a rich merchant, who comes to London, wastes all his money on luxurious living, prostitution and gambling, and as a consequence is imprisoned in the Fleet Prison and ultimately Bethlem Hospital (Bedlam).

Alan Parker

Sir Alan ParkerAlan William Parker
The filmmaker Alan Parker has described the works as an ancestor to the storyboard.

Storyboard

animaticstoryboardsanimatics
The filmmaker Alan Parker has described the works as an ancestor to the storyboard.

Inheritance

heirinheritedheirs
In the first painting, Tom has come into his fortune on the death of his miserly father.

Common-law marriage

common-law wifecommon law marriagecommon-law
Although he has had a common-law marriage with her, he now rejects the hand of his pregnant fiancée, Sarah Young, whom he had promised to marry (she holds his ring and her mother holds his love letters).

Wedding ring

wedding bandwedding ringsring
Although he has had a common-law marriage with her, he now rejects the hand of his pregnant fiancée, Sarah Young, whom he had promised to marry (she holds his ring and her mother holds his love letters).

Hospitality

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Evidence of the father's miserliness abound: his portrait above the fireplace shows him counting money; symbols of hospitality (a jack and spit) have been locked up at upper right; the coat of arms shows three clamped vises with the motto "Beware"; a half-starved cat reveals the father kept little food in the house, while lack of ashes in the fireplace demonstrates that he rarely spent money on wood to heat his home.

Coat of arms

armscoats of armscoat-of-arms
Evidence of the father's miserliness abound: his portrait above the fireplace shows him counting money; symbols of hospitality (a jack and spit) have been locked up at upper right; the coat of arms shows three clamped vises with the motto "Beware"; a half-starved cat reveals the father kept little food in the house, while lack of ashes in the fireplace demonstrates that he rarely spent money on wood to heat his home.

George Frideric Handel

HandelGeorg Friedrich HändelHändel
Surrounding Tom from left to right: a music master at a harpsichord, who was supposed to represent George Frideric Handel; a fencing master; a quarterstaff instructor; a dancing master with a violin; a landscape gardener, Charles Bridgeman; an ex-soldier offering to be a bodyguard; a bugler of a fox hunt club.