Abigail

AbbyAvigail
Abigail (, ’Ǎḇîḡayil) was the wife of Nabal; she became a wife of the future King David after Nabal's death (1 Samuel ).wikipedia
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David

King DavidDavid and GoliathDavidic
Abigail (, ’Ǎḇîḡayil) was the wife of Nabal; she became a wife of the future King David after Nabal's death (1 Samuel ).
David then took wives in Hebron, according to 2 Samuel 3; they were Ahinoam the Yizre'elite; Abigail, the wife of Nabal the Carmelite; Maacah, the daughter of Talmay, king of Geshur; Haggith; Abital; and Eglah.

Nabal

Nabal the Carmelite
Abigail (, ’Ǎḇîḡayil) was the wife of Nabal; she became a wife of the future King David after Nabal's death (1 Samuel ).
One of Nabal's shepherds, considering Nabal too abrasive to approach about the issue, warns Nabal's wife, Abigail, of the situation, along with a positive account of his previous experiences with David and his men.

Chileab

DanielChiliabKileab
She became the mother of one of David's sons, who is listed in the Book of Chronicles under the name Daniel, in the Masoretic Text of the Books of Samuel as Chileab, and in the Septuagint text of 2 Samuel 3:3 as Δαλουια, Dalouia.
He was David's son with his third wife Abigail, widow of Nabal the Carmelite, and is mentioned in, and.

Michal

Mikal
Abigail was David's third wife, after Saul's daughter, Michal, whom Saul later married to Palti, son of Laish when David went into hiding, and Ahinoam.
While David was hiding for his life, Saul gave Michal as a wife to Palti, son of Laish, and David took several other wives, including Abigail.

Huldah

HuldaShallum ben Tikvah
Abigail is also listed as one of the seven Jewish women prophets, the other six being Miriam, Deborah, Hannah, Sarah, Huldah,and Esther.
According to Jewish tradition, she was one of the "seven prophetesses", with Sarah, Miriam, Deborah, Hannah, Abigail and Esther.

Ahinoam

Abigail was David's third wife, after Saul's daughter, Michal, whom Saul later married to Palti, son of Laish when David went into hiding, and Ahinoam.
Levenson goes on to note that Ahinoam is always mentioned before Abigail and that she bears David a son before Abigail does, and concludes from this that "she was already married to David when the conflict with Nabal erupted."

List of women in the Heritage Floor

Heritage Floorthe Heritage Floorwas mistakenly included
Abigail is a featured figure on Judy Chicago's installation piece The Dinner Party, being represented in one of the 999 tiles of the Heritage Floor.

Abigail (mother of Amasa)

AbigailAbigail, mother of Amasa
Levenson and Halpern suggest that Abigail may, in fact, also be the same person as Abigail, mother of Amasa.
Jon Levenson and Baruch Halpern suggest that Abigail, mother of Amasa may, in fact, be the same Abigail who became David's wife.

Books of Samuel

1 Samuel2 SamuelSamuel
Abigail (, ’Ǎḇîḡayil) was the wife of Nabal; she became a wife of the future King David after Nabal's death (1 Samuel ).

Palti, son of Laish

PaltiPalti ben LaishPaltiel
Abigail was David's third wife, after Saul's daughter, Michal, whom Saul later married to Palti, son of Laish when David went into hiding, and Ahinoam.

Books of Chronicles

1 ChroniclesChronicles2 Chronicles
She became the mother of one of David's sons, who is listed in the Book of Chronicles under the name Daniel, in the Masoretic Text of the Books of Samuel as Chileab, and in the Septuagint text of 2 Samuel 3:3 as Δαλουια, Dalouia.

Masoretic Text

MasoreticMasorahMassoretic Text
She became the mother of one of David's sons, who is listed in the Book of Chronicles under the name Daniel, in the Masoretic Text of the Books of Samuel as Chileab, and in the Septuagint text of 2 Samuel 3:3 as Δαλουια, Dalouia.

Septuagint

LXXGreek Old TestamentGreek
She became the mother of one of David's sons, who is listed in the Book of Chronicles under the name Daniel, in the Masoretic Text of the Books of Samuel as Chileab, and in the Septuagint text of 2 Samuel 3:3 as Δαλουια, Dalouia.

American Standard Version

ASVAmerican Standard BibleAmerican Standard Version (ASV)
Her name is spelled Abigal in in the American Standard Version.

God

Supreme BeingLordnature of God
She gives him food, and speaks to him, urging him not to "have on his conscience the staggering burden of needless bloodshed" (verse 31, NIV) and reminding him that God will make him a "lasting dynasty" (verse 28).

Davidic line

House of DavidDavidic dynastyDavidic
She gives him food, and speaks to him, urging him not to "have on his conscience the staggering burden of needless bloodshed" (verse 31, NIV) and reminding him that God will make him a "lasting dynasty" (verse 28).

Adumbration

Jon Levenson calls this an "undeniable adumbration" of Nathan's prophecy in 2 Samuel 7.

Nathan (prophet)

NathanNathan the prophetthe Biblical prophet Nathan
Jon Levenson calls this an "undeniable adumbration" of Nathan's prophecy in 2 Samuel 7.

Covenant (biblical)

covenantAbrahamic covenantcovenants
Jon Levenson calls this an "undeniable adumbration" of Nathan's prophecy in 2 Samuel 7.

Alice Bach

Alice Bach notes that Abigail pronounces a "crucial prophecy," and the Talmud regards her as one of the Tanakh's seven female prophets.

Talmud

Babylonian TalmudTalmudicTalmudist
Alice Bach notes that Abigail pronounces a "crucial prophecy," and the Talmud regards her as one of the Tanakh's seven female prophets. The Talmud amplifies this idea, mentioning her as being one of the "four women of surpassing beauty in the world," (the other three being Rahab, Sarah, and Esther).

Hebrew Bible

TanakhbiblicalHebrew Scriptures
Alice Bach notes that Abigail pronounces a "crucial prophecy," and the Talmud regards her as one of the Tanakh's seven female prophets.

Rahab

RachabRahab and the SpiesRahab, harlot of Jericho
The Talmud amplifies this idea, mentioning her as being one of the "four women of surpassing beauty in the world," (the other three being Rahab, Sarah, and Esther).

Sarah

SaraiSaraIsaac's mother
Abigail is also listed as one of the seven Jewish women prophets, the other six being Miriam, Deborah, Hannah, Sarah, Huldah,and Esther. The Talmud amplifies this idea, mentioning her as being one of the "four women of surpassing beauty in the world," (the other three being Rahab, Sarah, and Esther).

Esther

Queen EstherAsyaBible
Abigail is also listed as one of the seven Jewish women prophets, the other six being Miriam, Deborah, Hannah, Sarah, Huldah,and Esther. The Talmud amplifies this idea, mentioning her as being one of the "four women of surpassing beauty in the world," (the other three being Rahab, Sarah, and Esther).