Ablative casewikipedia
The ablative case (sometimes abbreviated ) is a grammatical case for nouns, pronouns and adjectives in the grammar of various languages; it is sometimes used to express motion away from something, among other uses.
ablativeablative caseAbl.separative caseseparativeAblativesABLAllativeablative of mannermotion away from

List of glossing abbreviations

abbreviatedglossing abbreviationglossing abbreviations
The ablative case (sometimes abbreviated ) is a grammatical case for nouns, pronouns and adjectives in the grammar of various languages; it is sometimes used to express motion away from something, among other uses.

Grammatical case

casegrammatical casecases
The ablative case (sometimes abbreviated ) is a grammatical case for nouns, pronouns and adjectives in the grammar of various languages; it is sometimes used to express motion away from something, among other uses.
Latin grammars, such as Ars grammatica, followed the Greek tradition, but added the ablative case of Latin.

Latin grammar

Latinablative absolutegrammar
The ablative case in Latin (casus ablativus) appears in various grammatical constructions, including following various prepositions, in an ablative absolute clause, and adverbially.
(In neuter nouns the nominative and accusative cases are identical.) Nouns also have a genitive case, meaning "of" (rēgis "of the king"), a dative case, meaning "to" or "for" (rēgī "to/for the king"), and an ablative case, meaning "with" (rēge "with the king").

Finnish language

FinnishFinnish-languagefin
In Finnish, the ablative case is the sixth of the locative cases with the meaning "from, off, of": pöytä – pöydältä "table – off from the table".

Genitive case

genitivegenitive casegen.
In Ancient Greek, there was no ablative case; some of its functions were taken by the genitive and others by the dative; the genitive had functions belonging to the Proto-Indo-European genitive and ablative cases.
The ablative case of Indo-European was absorbed into the genitive in Classical Greek.

Latin

LatinLat.Latin language
The ablative case in Latin (casus ablativus) appears in various grammatical constructions, including following various prepositions, in an ablative absolute clause, and adverbially. The word "ablative" derives from the Latin ablatus, the (irregular) perfect passive participle of auferre "to carry away".

Proto-Indo-European language

Proto-Indo-EuropeanIndo-EuropeanPIE
In Ancient Greek, there was no ablative case; some of its functions were taken by the genitive and others by the dative; the genitive had functions belonging to the Proto-Indo-European genitive and ablative cases. The Latin ablative case was derived from three Proto-Indo-European cases: ablative (from), instrumental (with), and locative (in/at).

Armenian language

ArmenianArmenian:Arm.
The modern Armenian ablative has different markers for each main dialect, both originating from Classical Armenian.
Nouns are declined for one of seven cases: nominative (ուղղական uxxakan), accusative (հայցական hayc'akan), locative (ներգոյական nergoyakan), genitive (սեռական seṙakan), dative (տրական trakan), ablative (բացառական bac'aṙakan), or instrumental (գործիական gorciakan).

Allative case

allativeallative casedirectional
It is an outer locative case, used like the adessive and allative cases, to denote both being on top of something and "being around the place" (as opposed to the inner locative case, the elative, which means "from out of" or "from the inside of").

Albanian language

AlbanianAlbanian spellingAlbanian-speaking
The ablative case is found in Albanian; it is the fifth case, rasa rjedhore.
There are five declensions with six cases (nominative, accusative, genitive, dative, ablative, and vocative), although the vocative only occurs with a limited number of words, and the forms of the genitive and dative are identical (a genitive is produced when the prepositions i/e/të/së are used with the dative).

Eastern Armenian

EasternEastern ArmenianArmenian (Eastern)
The Western Armenian affix -է -ē (definite -էն -ēn) derives from the classical singular; the Eastern Armenian affix -ից -ic’ (both indefinite and definite) derives from the classical plural.
They are: nominative (subject), accusative (direct object), genitive (possession), dative (indirect object), ablative (origin), instrumental (means) and locative (position).

Western Armenian

WesternWestern ArmenianArmenian (Western)
The Western Armenian affix -է -ē (definite -էն -ēn) derives from the classical singular; the Eastern Armenian affix -ից -ic’ (both indefinite and definite) derives from the classical plural.
Western Armenian nouns have six grammatical cases: nominative (subject), accusative (direct object), genitive (possession), dative (indirect object), ablative (origin) and instrumental (means).

Adessive case

adessiveadessive case
It is an outer locative case, used like the adessive and allative cases, to denote both being on top of something and "being around the place" (as opposed to the inner locative case, the elative, which means "from out of" or "from the inside of").

Elative case

elativeelative caseelat.
It is an outer locative case, used like the adessive and allative cases, to denote both being on top of something and "being around the place" (as opposed to the inner locative case, the elative, which means "from out of" or "from the inside of").

Honorificabilitudinitatibus

honorificabilitudinitatibus
Honorificabilitudinitatibus (honōrificābilitūdinitātibus ) is the dative and ablative plural of the medieval Latin word honōrificābilitūdinitās, which can be translated as "the state of being able to achieve honours".

Modern Hebrew grammar

possessive form in Hebrewnoun derivation patternHebrew grammar
Modern Hebrew grammar is partly analytic, expressing such forms as dative, ablative, and accusative using prepositional particles rather than morphological cases.

Locative case

locativelocative caselocatives
The locative case belongs to the general local cases together with the lative and separative case.

Locomotive

locomotivelocomotivesrailway locomotive
The word locomotive originates from the Latin loco – "from a place", ablative of locus "place", and the Medieval Latin motivus, "causing motion", and is a shortened form of the term locomotive engine, which was first used in 1814 to distinguish between self-propelled and stationary steam engines.

Ab initio

ab initioab-initioab initio calculations
Ab initio is a Latin term meaning "from the beginning" and is derived from the Latin ab ("from") + initio, ablative singular of initium ("beginning").

Modulo (jargon)

modulomodulo (jargon)mod out
The word modulo (Latin, with respect to a modulus of ___) is the Latin ablative of modulus which itself means "a small measure."

Pound (currency)

£poundpounds
All ultimately derive from a borrowing into Proto-Germanic of the Latin expression lībra pondō ("a pound by weight"), in which the word pondō is the ablative case of the Latin noun pondus ("weight").

Icelandic language

Icelandicmodern IcelandicOld Icelandic
For example, many of the various Latin ablatives have a corresponding Icelandic dative.

Avallon

Aballo/Aballone
Avallon, Latin Aballō, ablative Aballone, is ultimately derived from Gaulish *Aballū, oblique *Aballon- meaning "Apple-tree (place)" or "(place of the) "Apple Tree Goddess" (from Proto-Celtic *abalnā, cf. Old Irish aball, Welsh afall, Old Breton aball(en), "apple tree").