Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives
Northeastern Virginia (1862)
Doubleday photo displayed at Fort Sumter National Monument in Charleston harbor
Second Bull Run Campaign, August 17–30, 1862 (Additional map).
Fort Sumter Medal bearing the likeness of Major Robert Anderson which was presented to Abner Doubleday
Battlefield of Manassas (right side)
Birthplace in Ballston Spa
Action at Brawner's Farm, August 28
Doubleday and his wife, Mary
August 29, 10 a.m.: Sigel's attack
Doubleday's tombstone in Arlington National Cemetery
August 29, 12 noon: Longstreet arrives, Porter stalls
Abner Doubleday monument in Ballston Spa
August 29, 3 p.m.: Grover's attack
August 29, 5–7 p.m., Kearny's attack, Hood vs. Hatch
Stonewall Jackson's cannons on Henry House Hill
August 30, 3 p.m., Porter's attack
August 30, 4 p.m.: Start of Longstreet's attack
August 30, 4:30 p.m.: Union defense of Chinn Ridge
August 30, 5 p.m.: Final Confederate attacks, beginning of the Union retreat
Bridge crossed by the Union troops retreating to Centreville
Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862
Union troops retreat after the battle
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<center>Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862</center>
<center>Virginia, Bull Run. Ruins of Stone Bridge, 1862</center>
<center>A group of men stand near the Manassas Railroad Junction railroad tracks in 1862 with a train in the background</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>Men sit near the Manassas Junction railroad in 1862</center>
<center>Picking up debris of trains after Pope's retreat</center>
<center>Bull Run, Va. Dedication of the battle monument; Judge Abram B. Olin of the District of Columbia Supreme Court, who delivered the address, stands by the rail.</center>
Battle map drafted by Sneden, Robert Knox, with notes on Union and Confederate strengths, casualties, done in pen and ink and water color
Northern Virginia Campaign, August 7–28, 1862 Confederate
Union

In the actions at Brawner's farm, just before the Second Battle of Bull Run, he took the initiative to send two of his regiments to reinforce Brigadier General John Gibbon's brigade against a larger Confederate force, fighting it to a standstill.

- Abner Doubleday

Brig Gen. Rufus King (brigades of Brig Gen. John P. Hatch, Brig Gen. Abner Doubleday, Brig Gen. Marsena R. Patrick, and Brig Gen. John Gibbon)

- Second Battle of Bull Run
Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives

4 related topics with Alpha

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Northern Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, 1861–1865

Battle of Gettysburg

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Fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War.

Fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War.

Northern Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, 1861–1865
The Gettysburg Campaign, 1863
The Battlefield of Gettysburg, 1863
This 1863 oval-shaped map depicts the Gettysburg Battlefield during July 1–3, 1863, showing troop and artillery positions and movements, relief hachures, drainage, roads, railroads, and houses with the names of residents at the time of the Battle of Gettysburg.
This November 1862 Harper's Magazine illustration shows Confiderate Army troops escorting captured African American civilians south into slavery. En route to Gettysburg, the Army of Northern Virginia kidnapped approximately 40 black civilians and sent them south into slavery.
Overview map of the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg
Marker commemorating the first shot fired at the Battle of Gettysburg at 7:30 am on July 1, 1863 by Lt. Marcellus Jones
Robert E. Lee's plan for July 2, 1863, the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg
Overview map of the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863
Union Army breastworks on Culp's Hill, 1863
Overview map of the third day of the Battle of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863
The high water mark on Cemetery Ridge with the 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry Monument commemorating the 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment at right and the Copse of Trees to the left, August 2005
"The Harvest of Death": Union dead on the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, photographed July 5 or July 6, 1863, by Timothy H. O'Sullivan
John L. Burns, veteran of the War of 1812, civilian who fought at the Battle of Gettysburg with Union troops, standing with bayoneted musket. Mathew Brady's National Photographic Portrait Galleries, photographer. From the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
Gettysburg Campaign (July 5 – July 14, 1863)
On November 19, 1863, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address, considered one of the best-known speeches in American history. A crowd of citizens and soldiers surround Lincoln (with a red arrow pointing to his location in photo)
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Gettysburg National Cemetery, July 2003
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The 1936 Battle of Gettysburg half dollar
Gettysburg Centennial Commemorative issue of 1963
Gettysburg Campaign (through July 3) with cavalry movements shown with dashed lines Confederate
Union

I Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. John F. Reynolds, with divisions commanded by Brig. Gen. James S. Wadsworth, Brig. Gen. John C. Robinson, and Maj. Gen. Abner Doubleday.

Prior to Gettysburg, Robert E. Lee had established a reputation as an almost invincible general, achieving stunning victories against superior numbers—although usually at the cost of high casualties to his army—during the Seven Days, the Northern Virginia Campaign (including the Second Battle of Bull Run), Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville.

Maj. Gen. John Buford

John Buford

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United States Army cavalry officer.

United States Army cavalry officer.

Maj. Gen. John Buford
August 1863 – General Buford (seated) & staff

His first command was a cavalry brigade under Major General John Pope, and he distinguished himself at Second Bull Run in August 1862, where he was wounded, and also saw action at Antietam in September and Stoneman's Raid in spring 1863.

The pallbearers included Generals Casey, Heintzelman, Sickles, Schofield, Hancock, Doubleday, and Warren.

John F. Reynolds

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Career United States Army officer and a general in the American Civil War.

Career United States Army officer and a general in the American Civil War.

Major General John Fulton Reynolds. From the Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
"The Fall of Reynolds" – drawing of Reynolds' death at Gettysburg
Possible location of General Reynolds' death
"Where Reynolds Fell," (from The Photographic History of the Civil War)

On the second day of the Second Battle of Bull Run, while most of the Union Army was retreating, Reynolds led his men in a last-ditch stand on Henry House Hill, site of the great Union debacle at First Bull Run the previous year.

Command passed to his senior division commander, Maj. Gen. Abner Doubleday.

The Battle of Antietam, by Kurz & Allison (1878), depicting the scene of action at Burnside's Bridge

Battle of Antietam

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Battle of the American Civil War fought on September 17, 1862, between Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia and Union Gen. George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac near Sharpsburg, Maryland and Antietam Creek.

Battle of the American Civil War fought on September 17, 1862, between Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia and Union Gen. George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac near Sharpsburg, Maryland and Antietam Creek.

The Battle of Antietam, by Kurz & Allison (1878), depicting the scene of action at Burnside's Bridge
The Battle of Antietam, by Kurz & Allison (1878), depicting the scene of action at Burnside's Bridge
Lincoln with McClellan and staff at the Grove Farm after the battle. Notable figures (from left) are 1. Col. Delos Sackett; 4. Gen. George W. Morell; 5. Alexander S. Webb, Chief of Staff, V Corps; 6. McClellan;. 8. Dr. Jonathan Letterman; 10. Lincoln; 11. Henry J. Hunt; 12. Fitz John Porter; 15. Andrew A. Humphreys; 16. Capt. George Armstrong Custer.
The Battle of Antietam, by Kurz & Allison (1878), depicting the scene of action at Burnside's Bridge
Battlefield of Antietam, situation September 15 to 16, 1862
Overview of the Battle of Antietam
Assaults by the I Corps, 5:30 to 7:30 a.m.
Dead Confederate soldiers from Starke's Louisiana Brigade, on the Hagerstown Turnpike, north of the Dunker Church. Photograph by Alexander Gardner.
Assaults by the XII Corps, 7:30 to 9:00 a.m.
The Dunker Church after September 17, 1862. Here, both Union and Confederate dead lie together on the field.
Assaults by the XII and II Corps, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Sunken Road
The Bloody Lane in 2005
Confederate dead lie in the "Bloody Lane" after the Battle of Antietam, 1862.
Assaults by the IX Corps, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Confederate dead gathered for burial after the battle. Photograph by Alexander Gardner.
Photograph by Alexander Gardner of Lincoln and McClellan near the Antietam battlefield, October 3, 1862
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{{center|Charge of the 51st New York and 51st Pennsylvania across Burnside's Bridge, by Edwin Forbes}}
{{center|Battle of Antietam by Kurz and Allison}}
{{center|Confederate guns on the hill above poured fire into the Union ranks at Burnside's bridge. Photo taken just after the Battle of Antietam, 1862.}}
Union positions below the Confederates at Burnside Bridge
Burnside Bridge in 2012
{{center|Confederate soldiers on the Antietam battlefield as they fell inside the fence on the Hagerstown road, September 1862 by Alexander Gardner}}
{{center|Harper's Weekly drawing of dead soldiers on Antietam battlefield, based on Gardner photograph}}
{{center|Confederate horses lay dead and artillery caissons destroyed on Antietam battlefield<ref>Site identified by Frassanito, pp. 168–70.</ref>}}
{{center|Dead on Antietam battlefield<ref>Site identified by Robert Kalasky, "Military Images" Volume XX, Number 6 May–June 1999, pp. 24–29.</ref>}}
{{center|Confederate dead at Bloody Lane, looking east from the north bank. Alexander Gardner photograph.}}
{{center|Confederate dead at Bloody Lane, looking northeast from the south bank. Alexander Gardner photograph.<ref>The Union soldiers looking on were likely members of the 130th Pennsylvania, who were assigned burial detail</ref>}}
{{center|"Confederate soldier who after being wounded had evidently dragged himself to a little ravine on the hillside where he died". Photograph by Alexander Gardner.}}
{{center|Federal burial party, by Alexander Gardner<ref>Site identified by Frassanito, pp. 144–47.</ref>}}
{{center|Burying Union dead on the Antietam battlefield}}
{{center|"A Lonely Grave"—Federal grave at Antietam, by Alexander Gardner<ref>Site identified by Frassanito, pp. 171–74.</ref>}}
{{center|Antietam Battlefield photograph, by Alexander Gardner<ref>Original description claimed "Battlefield of Antietam on the Day of the Battle" September 17, 1862; however, see Frassanito, pp. 70–73.</ref>}}
{{center|"Artillery Hell", by James Hope (Dunker Church at the far left)}}
{{center|"A Fateful Turn"—Late morning looking east toward the Roulette Farm", by James Hope}}
{{center|"The Aftermath at Bloody Lane", by James Hope}}
{{center|"Wasted Gallantry", by James Hope}}
{{center|"A Crucial Delay", by James Hope}}
{{center|The Lutheran Church just east of Sharpsburg marks the extent of the Union offensive during the Battle of Antietam, 1862.}}
"Battle of Antietam" by Thure de Thulstrup, showing the charge of the Iron Brigade near Dunker Church

Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia—about 55,000 men —entered the state of Maryland on September 3, following their victory at Second Bull Run on August 30.

Brig. Gen. Abner Doubleday (brigades of Col. Walter Phelps, Brig. Gens. Marsena R. Patrick and John Gibbon, and Lt. Col. J. William Hofmann).