Aboriginal Witnesses Act

Aboriginal Witnesses Act of 1848
The Aboriginal Witnesses Act was a series ordinances and amendments enacted by lieutenant Governor George Grey, Governor of South Australia during the South Australian colonial period.wikipedia
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George Grey

Sir George GreyGovernor GreyGrey
The Aboriginal Witnesses Act was a series ordinances and amendments enacted by lieutenant Governor George Grey, Governor of South Australia during the South Australian colonial period. The lieutenant Governor George Grey was responsible for the act, and later lieutenant Governor Frederick Robe was responsible for the acts amendments.
In 1844, Grey enacted a series ordinances and amendments first entitled the Aborigines' Evidence Act and later known as the Aboriginal Witnesses Act.

Frederick Robe

Lieutenant Colonel Frederick Holt RobeLieutenant-Colonel Frederick Holt RobeFrederick Holt Robe
The lieutenant Governor George Grey was responsible for the act, and later lieutenant Governor Frederick Robe was responsible for the acts amendments.
Entitled the Aboriginal Witnesses Act.

Avenue Range Station massacre

Possibly in response to the, Avenue Range Station massacre, where three Tanganekald women, two teenage girls, three infants, and an "old man blind and infirm" were murdered by Australian mass murderer and pastoralist James Brown, the Aboriginal Witnesses Act of 1848 was amended in July 1849 to allow a person to be convicted on the sole testimony of an Aboriginal person, though this rarely occurred.
The weakness of the case was directly related to the provisions of the Aboriginal Witnesses Act of 1848 regarding testimony given by Aboriginal witnesses.

James Brown (Australian pastoralist)

James BrownJames Brown Memorial Trust
Possibly in response to the, Avenue Range Station massacre, where three Tanganekald women, two teenage girls, three infants, and an "old man blind and infirm" were murdered by Australian mass murderer and pastoralist James Brown, the Aboriginal Witnesses Act of 1848 was amended in July 1849 to allow a person to be convicted on the sole testimony of an Aboriginal person, though this rarely occurred.
Nevertheless, Brown avoided trial, though few doubted his guilt, because the provisions of the Aboriginal Witnesses Act which determined that the evidence of an "uncivilised person or persons" was considered insufficient unless corroborated by other evidence - that the court could not base the conviction of a White man on the testimony of an Aboriginal witness.

Governor of South Australia

GovernorGovernors of South AustraliaLieutenant-Governor of South Australia
The Aboriginal Witnesses Act was a series ordinances and amendments enacted by lieutenant Governor George Grey, Governor of South Australia during the South Australian colonial period.

Oath

sworn inoathspledge
While its stated aim was to make provisions for unsworn testimony by "uncivilised people" to be admissible in court, the act made it possible for a judge to dismiss the testimony of an "uncivilised person or persons" as insufficient unless corroborated by other evidence - that the court could not base the conviction of a White man on the testimony of an Aboriginal witness alone.

Testimony

testifytestifiedtestimonies
While its stated aim was to make provisions for unsworn testimony by "uncivilised people" to be admissible in court, the act made it possible for a judge to dismiss the testimony of an "uncivilised person or persons" as insufficient unless corroborated by other evidence - that the court could not base the conviction of a White man on the testimony of an Aboriginal witness alone.

List of massacres of Indigenous Australians

massacremassacresAboriginal massacres
Effectively, the act created a situation where settler solidarity and the law of evidence ensured that the murder and massacre of Aboriginal Australians by European colonisers could not be tried solely on the evidence of Aboriginal witnesses.

Aboriginal Australians

AboriginalAustralian AboriginalAboriginal Australian
Effectively, the act created a situation where settler solidarity and the law of evidence ensured that the murder and massacre of Aboriginal Australians by European colonisers could not be tried solely on the evidence of Aboriginal witnesses.

History of Australia (1788–1850)

European settlementEuropean settlement of Australiacolonisation of Australia
Effectively, the act created a situation where settler solidarity and the law of evidence ensured that the murder and massacre of Aboriginal Australians by European colonisers could not be tried solely on the evidence of Aboriginal witnesses.

Tanganekald people

TanganekaldMilmenrura
Possibly in response to the, Avenue Range Station massacre, where three Tanganekald women, two teenage girls, three infants, and an "old man blind and infirm" were murdered by Australian mass murderer and pastoralist James Brown, the Aboriginal Witnesses Act of 1848 was amended in July 1849 to allow a person to be convicted on the sole testimony of an Aboriginal person, though this rarely occurred.

Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006

Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006 (Victoria)Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Act of 2006

Aboriginal Land Rights Act 1976

Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976Aboriginal Land Rights ActAboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act

Half-Caste Act

Aborigines Protection Act1886 Act to Provide for the Protection and Management of the Aboriginal Natives of VictoriaAborigines Act