Abraham

IbrahimAbramAvrahamAvramAbraham the Patriarchseed of AbrahamAb-ramAbarahamAbaramaAbimelech Taking Sarah
Abraham (né Abram) is the common patriarch of Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and other religions.wikipedia
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God in Judaism

GodGod of IsraelGod of the Jews
In Judaism, he is the founding father of the covenant of the pieces, the special relationship between the Hebrews and God; in Christianity, he is the prototype of all believers, Jewish or Gentile; and in Islam he is seen as a link in the chain of prophets that begins with Adam and culminates in Muhammad.
Traditionally, Judaism holds that Hashem, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob and the national god of the Israelites, delivered the Israelites from slavery in Egypt, and gave them the Law of Moses at biblical Mount Sinai as described in the Torah.

Abraham's family tree

Abraham, Isaac, and JacobAbrahamic descentdescendants of Abraham
Abraham is called by God to leave the house of his father Terah and settle in the land originally given to Canaan but which God now promises to Abraham and his progeny. The entire family, including grandchildren, lived in Ur of the Chaldees.
Abraham is known as the patriarch of the Israelite people through Isaac, the son born to him and Sarah in their old age and the patriarch of Arabs through his son Ishmael, born to Abraham and his wife’s servant Hagar.

Ishmael

IsmailIsmaelIsma'il
Various candidates are put forward who might inherit the land after Abraham; and, while promises are made to Ishmael about founding a great nation, Isaac, Abraham's son by his half-sister Sarah, inherits God's promises to Abraham.
Ishmael, a figure in the Tanakh and the Quran, was Abraham's first son according to Jews, Christians and Muslims.

Book of Genesis

GenesisGen.The Book of Genesis
The narrative in the Book of Genesis revolves around the themes of posterity and land.
At God's command Noah's descendant Abraham journeys from his home into the God-given land of Canaan, where he dwells as a sojourner, as does his son Isaac and his grandson Jacob.

Covenant of the pieces

Covenant between the PiecesAbrahamic covenantBrit
In Judaism, he is the founding father of the covenant of the pieces, the special relationship between the Hebrews and God; in Christianity, he is the prototype of all believers, Jewish or Gentile; and in Islam he is seen as a link in the chain of prophets that begins with Adam and culminates in Muhammad.
According to the Hebrew Bible, the covenant of the pieces or covenant between the parts (Hebrew: ברית בין הבתרים berith bayin hebatrim) was an event in which God revealed himself to Abraham and made a covenant with him, in which God announced to Abraham that his descendants would eventually inherit the Land of Israel.

Hebron

el-KhulilBeit HadassahHebron/Al-Khalil Old Town
Abraham purchases a tomb (the Cave of the Patriarchs) at Hebron to be Sarah's grave, thus establishing his right to the land; and, in the second generation, his heir Isaac is married to a woman from his own kin, thus ruling the Canaanites out of any inheritance. Abram went south to Hebron and settled in the plain of Mamre, where he built another altar to worship God.
Jews, Christians, and Muslims all venerate Hebron for its association with Abraham; it includes the traditional burial site of the biblical Patriarchs and Matriarchs, within the Cave of the Patriarchs.

Terah

AzarTharaAazar
Abraham is called by God to leave the house of his father Terah and settle in the land originally given to Canaan but which God now promises to Abraham and his progeny. Terah, the ninth in descent from Noah, was the father of three sons: Abram, Nahor, and Haran.
Terah or Térach ( – Téraḥ, in pausa – Tā́raḥ, "ibex, wild goat" or "wanderer; loiterer"; – Thára) is a biblical figure in the Book of Genesis, son of Nahor, son of Serug and father of the Patriarch Abraham, all descendants of Shem's son Arpachshad.

Cave of the Patriarchs

Ibrahimi MosqueCave of MachpelahTomb of the Patriarchs
Abraham purchases a tomb (the Cave of the Patriarchs) at Hebron to be Sarah's grave, thus establishing his right to the land; and, in the second generation, his heir Isaac is married to a woman from his own kin, thus ruling the Canaanites out of any inheritance.
According to the Abrahamic religions, the cave and adjoining field were purchased by Abraham as a burial plot.

Sarah

SaraiSaraIsaac's mother
Various candidates are put forward who might inherit the land after Abraham; and, while promises are made to Ishmael about founding a great nation, Isaac, Abraham's son by his half-sister Sarah, inherits God's promises to Abraham.
While some discrepancies exist in how she is portrayed by the different faiths, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam all depict her character similarly, as that of a pious woman, renowned for her hospitality and beauty, the wife of Abraham, and the mother of Isaac.

Isaac

SonYitzchak/IsaacIsak
Various candidates are put forward who might inherit the land after Abraham; and, while promises are made to Ishmael about founding a great nation, Isaac, Abraham's son by his half-sister Sarah, inherits God's promises to Abraham.
He was the son of Abraham and Sarah, the father of Jacob, and the grandfather of twelve tribes of Israel;.

Keturah

KeturaKeturah's sonsSecond wife of Abraham
Abraham later marries Keturah and has six more sons; but, on his death, when he is buried beside Sarah, it is Isaac who receives "all Abraham's goods", while the other sons receive only "gifts" (Genesis 25:5–8).
Keturah (, Ktura, possibly meaning "incense" ) was a concubine and wife of the Biblical patriarch Abraham.

El Shaddai

ShaddaiGod AlmightyAlmighty
Abraham is called by God to leave the house of his father Terah and settle in the land originally given to Canaan but which God now promises to Abraham and his progeny.
The first occurrence of the name is in Genesis 17:1, "And when Abram was ninety years old and nine, the appeared to Abram, and said unto him, I am El Shaddai; walk before me, and be thou perfect."

Patriarchal age

Ancestral historyPatriarchpatriarchal narratives
The Abraham story cannot be definitively related to any specific time, and it is widely agreed that the patriarchal age, along with the exodus and the period of the judges, is a late literary construct that does not relate to any period in actual history.
The patriarchal age is the era of the three biblical patriarchs, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, according to the narratives of Genesis 12–50.

Islam

IslamicMuslimMuslims
In Judaism, he is the founding father of the covenant of the pieces, the special relationship between the Hebrews and God; in Christianity, he is the prototype of all believers, Jewish or Gentile; and in Islam he is seen as a link in the chain of prophets that begins with Adam and culminates in Muhammad.
The Quran mentions the names of numerous figures considered prophets in Islam, including Adam, Noah, Abraham, Moses and Jesus, among others.

Nahor, son of Terah

NahorNachorNahor II
Terah, the ninth in descent from Noah, was the father of three sons: Abram, Nahor, and Haran.
In the account of Terah's family mentioned in, Nahor II ( – Nāḥōr) is listed as the son of Terah, amongst two other brothers, Abram and Haran.

Muhammad

Prophet MuhammadMohammedMohammad
In Judaism, he is the founding father of the covenant of the pieces, the special relationship between the Hebrews and God; in Christianity, he is the prototype of all believers, Jewish or Gentile; and in Islam he is seen as a link in the chain of prophets that begins with Adam and culminates in Muhammad.
According to Muslim tradition, Muhammad himself was a Hanif and one of the descendants of Ishmael, son of Abraham.

Ur of the Chaldees

UrUr KaśdimUr Kasdim
The entire family, including grandchildren, lived in Ur of the Chaldees.
Ur Kaśdim ( ʾur kasdim), commonly translated as Ur of the Chaldeans, is a city mentioned in the Hebrew Bible as the birthplace of the Israelite and Ismaelite patriarch Abraham.

Abraham and the Idol Shop

cease his idolatryTerah's idol shop
According to a midrash, Abram worked in Terah's idol shop in his youth.
Abraham and the Idol Shop appears in Genesis Rabbah chapter 38 and is a biblical commentary on the early life of Abraham.

Battle of Siddim

Battle of the Vale of SiddimBirshaShemeber
Abram's force headed north in pursuit of the Elamite army, who were already worn down from the Battle of Siddim.
The Battle of the Vale of Siddim, also often called the War of Nine Kings or the Slaughter of Chedorlaomer, was an event in the Hebrew Bible book of that occurred in the days of Abram and Lot.

Melchizedek

MelchisedechMelchisedekMelchizedech
Also, Melchizedek king of Salem (Jerusalem), a priest of God Most High, brought out bread and wine and blessed Abram and God.
He brings out bread and wine and then blesses Abram and El Elyon.

Haran

Charran
Terah, the ninth in descent from Noah, was the father of three sons: Abram, Nahor, and Haran.
He died in Ur of Chaldees (Ur Kaśdim), was a son of Terah, and brother of Abraham.

Chedorlaomer

ChodollagomorKedorlaomerWar of the Kings
Not only were they able to free the captives, Abram's unit chased and slaughtered the Elamite King Chedorlaomer at Hobah, just north of Damascus.
Genesis portrays him as allied with three other kings, campaigning against five Canaanite city-states in response to an uprising in the days of Abraham.

Hagar

HajarAgarHagar and Sarah
Sarai then offered her Egyptian handmaiden, Hagar, to Abram with the intention that she would bear him a son.
She was an Egyptian slave/handmaid of Sarai (Sarah), who gave her to Abraham to bear a child.

Haran (biblical place)

Haran Charan (or Haran)
Terah, with Abram, Sarai, and Lot, then departed for Canaan, but settled in a place named Haran, where Terah died at the age of 205.
Haran first appears in the Book of Genesis as the home of Terah and his descendants, and as Abraham's temporary home.

God in Abrahamic religions

GodAbrahamic GodGod of Abraham
Abram went south to Hebron and settled in the plain of Mamre, where he built another altar to worship God.
Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and the Bahai Faith are called Abrahamic religions because they all accept the tradition of the God (known as Yahweh in Hebrew and Allah in Arabic) that revealed himself to Abraham.