Abraham Lincoln

LincolnPresident LincolnPresident Abraham LincolnAbe LincolnAbraham16th President of the United StatesPresidentPresident Abraham Lincoln’sHonest AbeLincoln administration
Abraham Lincoln (/ˈliŋkən/; February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th president of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865.wikipedia
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1858 and 1859 United States Senate elections

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He became a leader in the new Republican Party and gained national attention in the 1858 debates against national Democratic leader Stephen Douglas in the U.S Senate campaign in Illinois.
In Illinois, incumbent Stephen A. Douglas (D) and challenger Abraham Lincoln (R) held a series of seven debates, known as the "Lincoln–Douglas debates."

Stephen A. Douglas

Stephen DouglasDouglasStephen Arnold Douglas
He became a leader in the new Republican Party and gained national attention in the 1858 debates against national Democratic leader Stephen Douglas in the U.S Senate campaign in Illinois.
He was the Democratic Party nominee for president in the 1860 election, but he was defeated by Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln.

Union (American Civil War)

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He preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the U.S. economy.
During the American Civil War (1861–1865), the Union, also known as the North, referred to the United States of America and specifically to the national government of President Abraham Lincoln and the 20 free states and four border states.

Confederate States of America

ConfederateConfederacyConfederate States
To secure its independence, the new Confederate States of America fired on Fort Sumter, one of the few U.S. forts in the South.
Convinced that the institution of slavery was threatened by the November 1860 election of Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln to the U.S. presidency on a platform which opposed the expansion of slavery into the western territories, the Confederacy declared its secession in rebellion to the United States, with the loyal states becoming known as the Union during the ensuing American Civil War.

Radical Republicans

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As the leader of the moderate faction of the Republican Party, Lincoln confronted Radical Republicans, who demanded harsher treatment of the South; War Democrats, who rallied a large faction of former opponents into his camp; anti-war Democrats (called Copperheads), who despised him; and irreconcilable secessionists, who plotted his assassination.
They were opposed during the War by the moderate Republicans (led by United States President Abraham Lincoln), and by the pro-slavery and anti-Reconstruction Democratic Party as well as liberals in the North during Reconstruction.

Gettysburg Address

The Gettysburg AddressGettysburgaddress
His Gettysburg Address became an iconic call for nationalism, republicanism, equal rights, liberty, and democracy.
The Gettysburg Address is a speech that U.S. President Abraham Lincoln delivered during the American Civil War at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Emancipation Proclamation

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As the war progressed, he maneuvered to end slavery, issuing the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863; ordering the Army to protect escaped slaves, encouraging border states to outlaw slavery, and pushing through Congress the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which outlawed slavery across the country.
The Emancipation Proclamation, or Proclamation 95, was a presidential proclamation and executive order issued by United States President Abraham Lincoln effective January 1, 1863.

John Wilkes Booth

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A few days after the Battle of Appomattox Court House, he was shot by John Wilkes Booth, an actor and Confederate sympathizer, on April 14, 1865, and died the following day.
John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838 – April 26, 1865) was an American actor who assassinated President Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C. on April 14, 1865.

Union blockade

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Lincoln closely supervised the war effort, including the selection of generals and the naval blockade that shut down the South's trade.
The blockade was proclaimed by President Abraham Lincoln in April 1861, and required the monitoring of 3500 mi of Atlantic and Gulf coastline, including 12 major ports, notably New Orleans and Mobile.

1864 United States presidential election

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Lincoln managed his own re-election campaign.
In the midst of the American Civil War, incumbent President Abraham Lincoln of the National Union Party easily defeated the Democratic nominee, former General George B. McClellan, by a wide margin of 221–21 electoral votes, with 55% of the popular vote.

Thomas Lincoln

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Abraham Lincoln was born on February 12, 1809, as the second child of Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks Lincoln, in a one-room log cabin on Sinking Spring Farm near Hodgenville, Kentucky.
Thomas Lincoln (January 6, 1778 – January 17, 1851) was an American farmer, carpenter, and father of the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln.

Historical rankings of presidents of the United States

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He is consistently ranked both by scholars and the public as among the greatest U.S. presidents.
Abraham Lincoln, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and George Washington are most often listed as the three highest-rated presidents among historians.

War Democrat

War DemocratsUnion Dem.anti-secession Democrats
As the leader of the moderate faction of the Republican Party, Lincoln confronted Radical Republicans, who demanded harsher treatment of the South; War Democrats, who rallied a large faction of former opponents into his camp; anti-war Democrats (called Copperheads), who despised him; and irreconcilable secessionists, who plotted his assassination.
The War Democrats demanded a more aggressive policy toward the Confederacy and supported the policies of Republican President Abraham Lincoln when the American Civil War broke out a few months after his victory in the 1860 presidential election.

Trent Affair

Trent'' Affairwar scare in late 1861Trent Incident
He suspended habeas corpus, and he averted British intervention by defusing the Trent Affair.
President Abraham Lincoln and his top advisors did not want to risk war with Britain over this issue.

Border states (American Civil War)

border statesborder stateborder slave states
As the war progressed, he maneuvered to end slavery, issuing the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863; ordering the Army to protect escaped slaves, encouraging border states to outlaw slavery, and pushing through Congress the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which outlawed slavery across the country.
When Abraham Lincoln called for troops to march south to recapture Fort Sumter and other national possessions, southern Unionists were dismayed.

Abraham Lincoln (captain)

Abraham LincolnCaptain Abraham Lincoln
Lincoln's paternal grandfather and namesake, Captain Abraham Lincoln, moved the family from Virginia to Jefferson County, Kentucky, in the 1780s.
Abraham Lincoln (May 13, 1744 – May 1786) was the grandfather of the 16th U.S. president, Abraham Lincoln.

Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park

Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic SiteSinking Spring FarmAbraham Lincoln Birthplace
Abraham Lincoln was born on February 12, 1809, as the second child of Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks Lincoln, in a one-room log cabin on Sinking Spring Farm near Hodgenville, Kentucky.
Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park preserves two separate farm sites in LaRue County, Kentucky where Abraham Lincoln was born and lived early in his childhood.

Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Thirteenth Amendment13th AmendmentThirteenth
He preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the U.S. economy. As the war progressed, he maneuvered to end slavery, issuing the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863; ordering the Army to protect escaped slaves, encouraging border states to outlaw slavery, and pushing through Congress the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which outlawed slavery across the country.
Though many slaves had been declared free by President Abraham Lincoln's 1863 Emancipation Proclamation, their post-war status was uncertain.

Samuel Lincoln

He was a descendant of Samuel Lincoln, an Englishman who migrated from Hingham, Norfolk, to its namesake, Hingham, Massachusetts, in 1638.
Samuel Lincoln (died May 26, 1690) was an Englishman and progenitor of many notable United States political figures, including his 4th great-grandson, President Abraham Lincoln, Maine governor Enoch Lincoln, and Levi Lincoln Sr. and Levi Lincoln Jr., both of whom served as Massachusetts Representatives, Governor and Lieutenant Governor.

Hingham, Massachusetts

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He was a descendant of Samuel Lincoln, an Englishman who migrated from Hingham, Norfolk, to its namesake, Hingham, Massachusetts, in 1638.
The town was named for Hingham, a village in the English county of Norfolk, East Anglia, whence most of the first colonists came, including Abraham Lincoln's ancestor Samuel Lincoln (1622–90), his first American ancestor, who came to Massachusetts in 1637.

Sarah Lincoln Grigsby

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They produced three children: Sarah, born on February 10, 1807; Abraham, on February 12, 1809; and Thomas, who died in infancy.
Sarah Lincoln Grigsby (February 10, 1807 – January 20, 1828) was the older sister of the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, and cared for him when they were young.

Spencer County, Indiana

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Born in a log cabin, Lincoln grew up on the frontier (mainly in Spencer County, Indiana) in a poor family.
Abraham Lincoln lived in Spencer County from 1816 to 1830, between the ages of seven and twenty-one.

Hardin County, Kentucky

Hardin CountyHardin Hardin County, Kentucky
Thomas then worked at odd jobs in Kentucky and in Tennessee, before settling with members of his family in Hardin County, Kentucky, in the early 1800s.
Hardin County is known for being the birthplace of former U.S. president Abraham Lincoln, though the location is now part of neighboring LaRue County.

New Jersey

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Samuel's grandson and great-grandson began the family's westward migration, passing through New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.
New Jersey was one of the few Union states (the others being Delaware and Kentucky) to select a candidate other than Abraham Lincoln twice in national elections, and sided with Stephen Douglas (1860) and George B. McClellan (1864) during their campaigns.

Mary Todd Lincoln

Mary ToddMary LincolnMrs. Lincoln
In 1840, Lincoln became engaged to Mary Todd, a daughter of Robert Smith Todd, a wealthy slave-owner in Lexington, Kentucky.
Mary Todd Lincoln ( Mary Ann Todd; December 13, 1818 – July 16, 1882) was the wife of the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, and as such the First Lady of the United States from 1861 to 1865.