The Kaaba at Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, the holiest Islamic site
The name ʾIbrāhīm written in Islamic calligraphy, followed by "Peace be upon him".
Muhammad receiving his first revelation from the angel Gabriel. From the manuscript Jami' al-Tawarikh by Rashid-al-Din Hamadani, 1307.
Ibrahim's Sacrifice; Timurid Anthology, 1410–1411
The first chapter of the Quran, Al-Fatiha (The Opening), is seven verses
The most significant mosque in Islam, that is the Mosque of the Kaaba in the Hejazi city of Mecca, is believed to date to the time of Abraham and Ishmael
A Persian miniature depicts Muhammad leading Abraham, Moses, Jesus and other prophets in prayer.
The Maqam (Station) of Abraham which is believed by Muslims to contain his footprints, near the Kaaba in Al-Masjid Al-Haram
Silver coin of the Mughal Emperor Akbar, inscribed with the Shahadah
Al-Aqsa Mosque in the Temple Mount, Old City of Jerusalem in Shaam, is also believed to date to the lifetime of Abraham
Muslim men prostrating in prayer, at the Umayyad Mosque, Damascus.
Exterior view of the Cave of the Patriarchs in the Old City of Hebron, the Holy Land
A fast-breaking feast, known as Iftar, is served traditionally with dates
Cenotaph over Abraham's grave in his mosque
Pilgrims at the Great Mosque of Mecca during the Hajj season
In the section of the cave which is a mosque, this grate allows visitors to look down into a shaft measuring {{convert|40|ft|m|abbr=off}}, which leads to the ground level of the cave where Abraham and Sarah are buried
Muslim men reading the Quran
Portrait of the Mughal Emperor Akbar supplicating to God.
Rashidun and Umayyad expansion
Dome of the Rock built by caliph Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan; completed at the end of the Second Fitna
The eye, according to Hunain ibn Ishaq from a manuscript dated c. 1200
Ghazan Khan, 7th Ilkhanate ruler of the Mongol Empire, converts to Islam
Abdülmecid II was the last Caliph of Islam from the Ottoman dynasty.
World Muslim population by percentage (Pew Research Center, 2014).
The nine volumes of Sahih Al-Bukhari, one of the six Sunni hadith books
The Imam Hussein Shrine in Iraq is a holy site for Shia Muslims
An overview of the major sects and madhahib of Islam
The Whirling Dervishes, or Mevlevi Order by the tomb of Sufi-mystic Rumi
Islamic schools of law in the Muslim world
Crimean Tatar Muslim students (1856)
Islamic veils represent modesty
John of Damascus, under the Umayyad Caliphate, viewed Islamic doctrines as a hodgepodge from the Bible.
Great Mosque of Djenné, in the west African country of Mali
Dome in Po-i-Kalyan, Bukhara, Uzbekistan
14th century Great Mosque of Xi'an in China
16th century Menara Kudus Mosque in Indonesia showing Indian influence
The phrase Bismillah in an 18th-century Islamic calligraphy from the Ottoman region.
Geometric arabesque tiling on the underside of the dome of Hafiz Shirazi's tomb in Shiraz, Iran
Ulu mosque in Utrecht, Netherlands

Abraham plays a prominent role as an example of faith in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

- Abraham in Islam

Muslims believe that Islam is the complete and universal version of a primordial faith that was revealed many times through earlier prophets such as Adam, Abraham, Moses, and Jesus, among others; these earlier revelations are attributed to Judaism and Christianity, which are regarded in Islam as spiritual predecessor faiths.

- Islam
The Kaaba at Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, the holiest Islamic site

12 related topics

Alpha

"Muhammad, the Messenger of God."
inscribed on the gates of the Prophet's Mosque in Medina

Muhammad

"Muhammad, the Messenger of God."
inscribed on the gates of the Prophet's Mosque in Medina
"Muhammad" written in Thuluth, a script variety of Islamic calligraphy
A folio from an early Quran, written in Kufic script (Abbasid period, 8th–9th centuries)
Main tribes and settlements of Arabia in Muhammad's lifetime
Miniature from Rashid-al-Din Hamadani's Jami al-Tawarikh,, illustrating the story of Muhammad's role in re-setting the Black Stone in 605. (Ilkhanate period)
The cave Hira in the mountain Jabal al-Nour where, according to Muslim belief, Muhammad received his first revelation
Muhammad receiving his first revelation from Gabriel in Jami' al-tawarikh by Rashīd al-Dīn Ṭabīb (1307)
The last verse from An-Najm: "So prostrate to Allah and worship." Muhammad's message of monotheism challenged the traditional order
The Al-Aqsa Mosque, part of the al-Haram ash-Sharif complex in Jerusalem and built in 705, was named the "farthest mosque" to honor the possible location to which Muhammad travelled in his night journey.
Quranic inscriptions on the Dome of the Rock. It marks the spot Muhammad is believed by Muslims to have ascended to heaven.
"The Prophet Muhammad and the Muslim Army at the Battle of Uhud", from a 1595 edition of the Mamluk-Turkic Siyer-i Nebi
The Masjid al-Qiblatayn, where Muhammad established the new Qibla, or direction of prayer
The Kaaba in Mecca long held a major economic and religious role for the area. Seventeen months after Muhammad's arrival in Medina, it became the Muslim Qibla, or direction for prayer (salat). The Kaaba has been rebuilt several times; the present structure, built in 1629, is a reconstruction of an earlier building dating to 683.
A depiction of Muhammad (with veiled face) advancing on Mecca from Siyer-i Nebi, a 16th-century Ottoman manuscript. The angels Gabriel, Michael, Israfil and Azrail, are also shown.
Conquests of Muhammad (green lines) and the Rashidun caliphs (black lines). Shown: Byzantine empire (North and West) & Sassanid-Persian empire (Northeast).
Anonymous illustration of al-Bīrūnī's The Remaining Signs of Past Centuries, depicting Muhammad prohibiting Nasī’ during the Farewell Pilgrimage, 17th-century Ottoman copy of a 14th-century (Ilkhanate) manuscript (Edinburgh codex).
A hilya containing a description of Muhammad, by Ottoman calligrapher Hâfiz Osman (1642–1698)
The tomb of Muhammad is located in the quarters of his third wife, Aisha. (Al-Masjid an-Nabawi, Medina)
The Muslim profession of faith, the Shahadah, illustrates the Muslim conception of the role of Muhammad: "There is no god except the God; Muhammad is the Messenger of God." in Topkapı Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
Calligraphic rendering of "may God honor him and grant him peace", customarily added after Muhammad's name, encoded as a ligature at Unicode code point U+FDFA..
Muhammad's entry into Mecca and the destruction of idols. Muhammad is shown as a flame in this manuscript. Found in Bazil's Hamla-i Haydari, Jammu and Kashmir, India, 1808.
Muhammad in La vie de Mahomet by M. Prideaux (1699). He holds a sword and a crescent while trampling on a globe, a cross, and the Ten Commandments.

Muhammad ibn Abdullah (مُحَمَّد ٱبن عَبْد ٱللَّٰه, Classical Arabic pronunciation: ; c. undefined 570 – 8 June 632 CE) was an Arab religious, social, and political leader and the founder of the world religion of Islam.

According to Islamic doctrine, he was a prophet, divinely inspired to preach and confirm the monotheistic teachings of Adam, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and other prophets.

'Muhammad' in Islamic calligraphy

Muhammad in Islam

Believed to be the seal of the messengers and prophets of God in all the main branches of Islam.

Believed to be the seal of the messengers and prophets of God in all the main branches of Islam.

'Muhammad' in Islamic calligraphy
The name Muhammad written in Thuluth, a script variety of Islamic calligraphy
The birthplace of Muhammad. After his migration, the house was taken and sold by Aqil ibn Abi Talib. In modern times, the house was demolished and converted into a library in 1951.
Inside view of Quba Mosque
The place where the people of Medina welcomed Muhammad when he came from Mecca
A map of the Badr campaign
Artifact of Muhammad's letter to the Muqawqis, ruler of Egypt- actual document on the right with transcription on the left- Topkapi Palace Museum, Istanbul
Tabuk, Saudi Arabia
Al-Aqsa Mosque, in the Old City of Jerusalem, is said to be the location to which Muhammad traveled in his night journey. The location is the third holiest place for the Muslims.
A view of Taif with a road at the foreground and mountains at the background. Muhammad went there to preach Islam
Masjid an-Nabawi
Inside view of Masjid an-Nabawi
The Green Dome built over Muhammad's tomb
Part of Al-Masjid an-Nabawi where Muhammad's tomb is situated
Masjid an-Nabawi at sunset
Facsimile of a letter sent by Muhammad to the Munzir Bin Sawa Al-Tamimi, governor of Bahrain
Muhammad's letter To Heraclius

Muslims believe that the Quran, the central religious text of Islam, was revealed to Muhammad by God, and that Muhammad was sent to restore Islam, which they believe did not originate with Muhammad but is the true unaltered original monotheistic faith of Adam, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and other prophets.

Pilgrims at the Al-Masjid Al-Haram Mosque in Mecca on Hajj in 2010

Hajj

Pilgrims at the Al-Masjid Al-Haram Mosque in Mecca on Hajj in 2010
Air-conditioned tents in Mina city (Saudi Arabia), 2 km away from Mecca.
A Hajj certificate dated 602 AH (1205 CE).
A 1907 photograph of people praying near the Kaaba in the Great Mosque of Mecca
Diagram of the locations and rites of Hajj
Direction of the Tawaf around the Kaaba
Pilgrims wearing Ihram near Mount Arafat on the day of Hajj
Mount Arafat during Hajj
Pilgrims at Muzdalifah
Pilgrims performing "Ramy Al-Jamarat" (Stoning of the Devil) ceremony during the 2006 Hajj
Pilgrims performing Tawaf around the Kaaba
A Saudi security officer on vigil
Sa'yee towards Safa
Central section reserved for the elderly and the disabled. It is also divided into two directions of travel.
Sa'yee returning from Safa
Pilgrim in supplication at the Al-Masjid Al-Haram in Mecca.
The largest Jamarah (pillar) these pillars depict the evils in Islam and are stoned by the devotees.
Pilgrims visiting the well of Zamzam.
Mount Safa within the Al-Masjid Al-Haram in Mecca.
Mount Marwah within the Al-Masjid Al-Haram in Mecca.
Tents at Mina.
Mount Arafat during Ḥajj with Pilgrims supplicating.
Mount Arafat, a few miles away from Mecca.

The Hajj (حَجّ Ḥajj; sometimes also spelled Hadj, Hadji or Haj in English) is an annual Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia, the holiest city for Muslims.

The Hajj is associated with the life of Islamic prophet Muhammad from the 7th century AD, but the ritual of pilgrimage to Mecca is considered by Muslims to stretch back thousands of years to the time of Abraham.

Prayer in Cairo (1865)
Jean-Léon Gérôme

Muslims

Prayer in Cairo (1865)
Jean-Léon Gérôme
World Muslim population by percentage ( from Pew Research Center)
A map of Muslim populations by absolute number

Muslims (مسلم, ) are people who adhere to Islam, an Abrahamic religion.

Some of those that were mentioned are: Adam, Noah, Abraham, Ishmael, Jacob, Moses, and Jesus and his apostles are all considered to be Muslims in the Qur'an.

Musa's name in Islamic calligraphy followed by Peace be upon him

Moses in Islam

This article covers the views on Moses specific to Islamic theology.

This article covers the views on Moses specific to Islamic theology.

Musa's name in Islamic calligraphy followed by Peace be upon him
Asiya (depicted with long black tresses) and her servants, having finished bathing, find baby Musa in the Nile. Their clothes hang in the trees while the river waves and crests are done in the Chinese style. Illustration from the Persian Jami' al-tawarikh
The Midian Mountains near Haql on the coast of the Gulf of Aqaba, which separates Midian in the northern part of the Arabian Peninsula and Ash-Shaam from the Sinai Peninsula in present-day Egypt
This is believed to be the Biblical Mount Sinai, where Musa first spoke to God.
Pharaoh watches a serpent devour a demon in the presence of Musa; from a manuscript of Qisas al-Anbiya, c. 1540.
The revelation of the Torah at Mount Sinai as depicted in Biblical illustrations
Maqam Musa, Jericho, West Bank
Grave of Musa, between Jericho and Jerusalem
Name plate for Musa, between Jericho and Jerusalem
Musa with a cane in his hand, 15th century Persian miniature, Czartoryski Museum
A handwritten copy of the Torah.
Nabi Musa Compound in twilight time

In Islam, Mūsā ibn ʿImrān (موسی ابن عمران, ), is an important prophet and messenger of God (Allah) and is the most frequently mentioned individual in the Quran, with his name being mentioned 136 times and his life being narrated and recounted more than that of any other prophet.

He is regarded by Muslims as one of the five most prominent prophets in Islam, along with Jesus (Isa), Abraham (Ibrahim), Noah (Nuh) and Muhammad.

Jesus' name in Islamic calligraphy followed by Peace be upon him

Jesus in Islam

In Islam, Isa refers to Jesus.

In Islam, Isa refers to Jesus.

Jesus' name in Islamic calligraphy followed by Peace be upon him
The Annunciation in miniature
According to the Quran, the pains of labor took Mary to the trunk of a palm tree.
The Jordan River, where Jesus was baptized by Yahya ibn Zakariya (John the Baptist).
Timeline of Arrival of Jesus before Judgement Day
The Minaret of Isa in the Umayyad Mosque, Damascus
Jesus and Mary in an old Persian miniature
Muhammad leads Jesus, Abraham, Moses and others in prayer. Medieval Persian miniature.

In Islam, Jesus (عِيسَى ٱبْنُ مَرْيَمَ) is believed to be the penultimate prophet and messenger of God (Allah) and the Messiah.

Qadi al-Nu'man explains that Jesus was from the pure progeny of Abraham, just as Ali and his sons were from the pure progeny of Muhammad, through Fatima.

Mecca

Panorama of Mecca, 1845, from the Khalili Collection of Hajj and the Arts of Pilgrimage
The area surrounding the Haram Shareef.
The Hajj involves pilgrims visiting Al-Haram Mosque, but mainly camping and spending time in the plains of Mina and Arafah
Jabal al-Nour, the mountain atop which is the Hira cave, where it is believed Muhammad received his first revelation.
The Quran Gate
Mecca as seen from the International Space Station
The al-'Aziziyah district of Mecca
Kaaba in July 2021, during COVID-19 restrictions.
Al-Haram Mosque and the Kaaba
Kaaba during expansion in 2013
Hajj terminal
Entry Gate of Mecca on Highway 40
Mecca Metro Route Map
Mecca, {{circa}} 1718 CE
Mecca, c. 1778 CE
Mecca, in the 1880s
Mecca in 1910
Pilgrims surround the Ka'bah in 1910

Mecca, officially Makkah al-Mukarramah (مكة المكرمة, ) and commonly shortened to Makkah (مكة, ), is a city and administrative center of the Mecca Province of Saudi Arabia, and the holiest city in Islam.

The Great Mosque of Mecca, known as the Masjid al-Haram, is home to the Ka'bah, believed by Muslims to have been built by Abraham and Ishmael.

View of the Kaaba, 1718. Adriaan Reland: Verhandeling van de godsdienst der Mahometaanen

Kaaba

View of the Kaaba, 1718. Adriaan Reland: Verhandeling van de godsdienst der Mahometaanen
Miniature from 1307 CE depicting Muhammad fixing the black stone into the Kaaba
The Kaaba and Masjid al-Haram depicted on a talismanic shirt, 16th or early 17th century
Ottoman tiles representing the Kaaba, 17th century.
The Black Stone is seen through a portal in the Kaaba
In 1910
The Kaaba during an expansion phase in 2013
A technical drawing of the Kaaba showing dimensions and elements
Rukn al-Yamani (The Yemeni Corner)
The Bāb at-Tawbah, "Door of Repentance"
The Kaaba with the signature minarets. A similar view is printed on the obverse side of 500-riyal (approximately 133 USD) notes in Saudi Arabia.
The Station of Ibrahim (Maqam Ibrahim)
The Mīzāb al-Raḥmah
The Kaaba and the Masjid Al-Haram during Hajj, 2008

The Kaaba (ٱلْكَعْبَة, ), also spelled Ka'bah or Kabah, sometimes referred to as al-Kaʿbah al-Musharrafah (ٱلْكَعْبَة ٱلْمُشَرَّفَة), is a building at the center of Islam's most important mosque, the Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia.

The Kaaba is believed by Muslims to have been rebuilt several times throughout history, most famously by Ibrahim (Abraham) and his son Ismail (Ishmael), when he returned to the valley of Mecca several years after leaving his wife Hajar (Hagar) and Ismail there upon Allah's command.

The Kaaba at Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, the holiest Islamic site

Prophets and messengers in Islam

The Kaaba at Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, the holiest Islamic site

Prophets in Islam (الأنبياء في الإسلام) are individuals in Islam who are believed to spread God's message on Earth and to serve as models of ideal human behaviour.

The Quran itself calls Islam the "religion of Abraham" (Ibrahim) and refers to Jacob (Yaqub) and the Twelve Tribes of Israel as being Muslims.

Detail of Gabriel from Pinturicchio's The Annunciation (1501)

Gabriel

Archangel who appears in the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and the Quran.

Archangel who appears in the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and the Quran.

Detail of Gabriel from Pinturicchio's The Annunciation (1501)
Annunciation of Gabriel by Jan van Eyck, 1434
Statue of Archangel Gabriel (15th century), adorning the top of the northwest corner pillar of the Palazzo Ducale in Venice
Archangel Gabriel. A fresco from the Tsalenjikha Cathedral by Cyrus Emanuel Eugenicus. 14th century.
Gabriel on the southern deacons' door of the iconostasis in the Cathedral of Hajdúdorog, Hungary
Icon of Gabriel, Byzantine, c. 1387–1395 (Tretyakov Gallery)
The Annunciation, Henry Ossawa Tanner (1898)
The Annunciation, Gabriel kneeling on one knee. Llanbeblig Book of Hours (f. 1r.).
Detail of Gabriel from Leonardo da Vinci's Annunciation (c. 1472–1475)
Angel of the Annunciation by Titian (1520–1522)
Archangel Gabriel Millennium Monument at Heroes' Square in Budapest
Archangel Gabriel in the church of St. Georg in Bermatingen
Archangel Gabriel in the church of St. Magnus in Waldburg
Archangel Gabriel at the facade of the Cathedral of Reims
Archangel Gabriel at the Liberty square, Budapest

Islam regards Gabriel as an archangel sent by God to various prophets, including Muhammad.

Muslims believe that Gabriel was the angel who informed Zachariah (Zakariyyā) of John's birth, as well as Mary (Maryam) of the future nativity of Jesus; and that Gabriel was one of three angels who had earlier informed Abraham (ʾIbrāhīm) of the birth of Isaac (ʾIsḥāq) [].