Abramelin oil

holy oilOil of AbramelinAbramelin operationHoly Oil of Aspirationoil
Abramelin oil, also called Oil of Abramelin, is a ceremonial magic oil blended from aromatic plant materials.wikipedia
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The Book of Abramelin

The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the MageAbramelinThe Book of the Sacred Magic of Abra-Melin the Mage
Its name came about due to its having been described in a medieval grimoire called The Book of Abramelin written by Abraham the Jew (presumed to have lived from c.1362–c.1458). The oil is described in The Book of Abramelin by Abraham of Worms, a Jew from Worms, Germany, presumed to have lived from c.1362–c.1458. Taking this into account, the five ingredients listed by Abraham of Worms in The Book of Abramelin are identical to those listed in the Bible.
Magic squares feature prominently in the instructions for carrying out these operations, as does a recipe for an anointing oil (taken from Exodus 30), popularly used by ceremonial magicians under the name "Abramelin Oil".

Ceremonial magic

ritual magicmagicianceremonial magician
Abramelin oil, also called Oil of Abramelin, is a ceremonial magic oil blended from aromatic plant materials.
On the altar, too, is a phial of oil to represent his aspiration, and for consecrating items to his intent.

Holy anointing oil

anointing oilholy oiloil
The recipe is adapted from the Jewish Holy anointing oil of the Tanakh, which is described in the Book of Exodus (30:22-25) attributed to Moses.

Magick (Thelema)

magickmagicalmagickal
Abramelin oil became popular in the Western esoteric tradition in the 20th century after the publication of the S. L. MacGregor Mathers English translation of The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage (1897), and especially via Aleister Crowley, who used a similar version of the oil in his system of Magick.
Common weapons include the dagger (or athame in neopagan parlance), sword, wand, holy oil, cup (or graal), disk (or pentacle), oil lamp, bell, and thurible (or censer).

Grimoire

grimoiresblack bookbook of spells
Its name came about due to its having been described in a medieval grimoire called The Book of Abramelin written by Abraham the Jew (presumed to have lived from c.1362–c.1458).

Judaism

JewishJewsJudaic
The recipe is adapted from the Jewish Holy anointing oil of the Tanakh, which is described in the Book of Exodus (30:22-25) attributed to Moses.

Hebrew Bible

TanakhbiblicalHebrew Scriptures
The recipe is adapted from the Jewish Holy anointing oil of the Tanakh, which is described in the Book of Exodus (30:22-25) attributed to Moses.

Book of Exodus

ExodusEx.Shemot
The recipe is adapted from the Jewish Holy anointing oil of the Tanakh, which is described in the Book of Exodus (30:22-25) attributed to Moses.

Moses

MosaicMosheMusa
The recipe is adapted from the Jewish Holy anointing oil of the Tanakh, which is described in the Book of Exodus (30:22-25) attributed to Moses.

Western esotericism

esotericesotericismesotericist
Abramelin oil became popular in the Western esoteric tradition in the 20th century after the publication of the S. L. MacGregor Mathers English translation of The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage (1897), and especially via Aleister Crowley, who used a similar version of the oil in his system of Magick.

Samuel Liddell MacGregor Mathers

MacGregor MathersS.L. MacGregor MathersS. L. MacGregor Mathers
Abramelin oil became popular in the Western esoteric tradition in the 20th century after the publication of the S. L. MacGregor Mathers English translation of The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage (1897), and especially via Aleister Crowley, who used a similar version of the oil in his system of Magick.

Aleister Crowley

CrowleyCrowley, Aleister Aleister Crowley: The Beast 666
Abramelin oil became popular in the Western esoteric tradition in the 20th century after the publication of the S. L. MacGregor Mathers English translation of The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage (1897), and especially via Aleister Crowley, who used a similar version of the oil in his system of Magick.

Thelema

ThelemicThelemiteThelemites
There are multiple recipes in use today and the oil continues to be used in several modern occult traditions, particularly Thelema (created in 1904 by Crowley) and the Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica.

Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica

Gnostic Catholic ChurchGnostic churchSaints of Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica
There are multiple recipes in use today and the oil continues to be used in several modern occult traditions, particularly Thelema (created in 1904 by Crowley) and the Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
The oil is described in The Book of Abramelin by Abraham of Worms, a Jew from Worms, Germany, presumed to have lived from c.1362–c.1458.

Worms, Germany

WormsWorms am RheinHerrnsheim
The oil is described in The Book of Abramelin by Abraham of Worms, a Jew from Worms, Germany, presumed to have lived from c.1362–c.1458.

Acorus calamus

sweet flagcalamussedge
But, instead of calamus, Guth has translated these as "galanga root" (galangal).

Galangal

GalangaGalingaleAlpiniae Officinari Rhizoma
But, instead of calamus, Guth has translated these as "galanga root" (galangal).

Bible

biblicalThe BibleChristian Bible
Taking this into account, the five ingredients listed by Abraham of Worms in The Book of Abramelin are identical to those listed in the Bible.

Cinnamon

cinnamon stickscinnamon barkcinnamon tree
Since Cinnamon and Cassia are two species of the same Cinnamomum genus, their doubling up into one name by the translator of the French manuscript is not unexpected.

Cinnamomum

carpano treescassiacinnamon plant
Since Cinnamon and Cassia are two species of the same Cinnamomum genus, their doubling up into one name by the translator of the French manuscript is not unexpected.

Essential oil

essential oilsvolatile oilaromatic plant
A recipe for Abramelin oil using essential oils is as follows: