Abu Ayyub al-Masri

Abu Hamza al-MuhajirAbu Ayub al-MasriAyyub al-MasriDeath of Abu Ayyub al-MasriAbd al-Mun’im bin Izz al-Din al-BadawiAbu AyyubAbu Hamza al-MuhajerAbu-Hamzah al-MuhajirnameYussef Dardiri
Abu Ayyub al-Masri (أبو أيّوب المصري, ', translation: "Father of Ayyub the Egyptian"; 1967 – 18 April 2010), also known as Abu Hamza al-Muhajir (أبو حمزة المهاجر ', translation: "Father of Hamza the immigrant") and other aliases (see name), was the leader of Al-Qaeda in Iraq during the Iraqi insurgency, following the death of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in June 2006.wikipedia
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Islamic State of Iraq

ISIal-Qaeda in IraqIslamic State
He was prime minister of the Islamic State of Iraq from 2009–2010. On May 14, 2010, al-Nasser Lideen Illah Abu Suleiman replaced al-Masri as war minister of the Islamic State of Iraq.
Shortly after al-Zarqawi's death, al-Qaeda in Iraq named a new leader, Abu-Hamzah al-Muhajir, thought to be a pseudonym, which the US military named as Abu Ayyub al-Masri, an Egyptian militant based in Baghdad.

Abu Musab al-Zarqawi

al-ZarqawiAbu Musab al ZarqawiZarqawi
Abu Ayyub al-Masri (أبو أيّوب المصري, ', translation: "Father of Ayyub the Egyptian"; 1967 – 18 April 2010), also known as Abu Hamza al-Muhajir (أبو حمزة المهاجر ', translation: "Father of Hamza the immigrant") and other aliases (see name), was the leader of Al-Qaeda in Iraq during the Iraqi insurgency, following the death of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in June 2006.
Tenet also wrote in his book that Thirwat Shehata and Yussef Dardiri, "assessed by a senior al-Qa'ida detainee to be among the Egyptian Islamic Jihad's best operational planners", arrived in Baghdad in May 2002 and were engaged in "sending recruits to train in Zarqawi's camps".

Tanzim Qaidat al-Jihad fi Bilad al-Rafidayn

al-Qaeda in IraqAl Qaeda in Iraqal-Qaida in Iraq
Abu Ayyub al-Masri (أبو أيّوب المصري, ', translation: "Father of Ayyub the Egyptian"; 1967 – 18 April 2010), also known as Abu Hamza al-Muhajir (أبو حمزة المهاجر ', translation: "Father of Hamza the immigrant") and other aliases (see name), was the leader of Al-Qaeda in Iraq during the Iraqi insurgency, following the death of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in June 2006.
The group's leadership was then assumed by the Egyptian militant Abu Ayyub al-Masri, also known as Abu Hamza al-Muhajir.

Egyptian Islamic Jihad

al-JihadIslamic Jihadjihadis
Born in Egypt, he joined the Muslim Brotherhood and, according to General Caldwell, joined Ayman al-Zawahiri's Egyptian Islamic Jihad in 1982, where he "worked with Zawahiri."

Abu Suleiman al-Naser

Abu Suleiman al-NasserAl-Nasser Lideen Allah Abu Suleimanal-Nasser Lideen Illah Abu Suleiman
On May 14, 2010, al-Nasser Lideen Illah Abu Suleiman replaced al-Masri as war minister of the Islamic State of Iraq.
He succeeded Abu Ayyub al-Masri as Minister of War for the Islamic State of Iraq (ISI) in April 2010, after al-Masri and ISI leader Abu Omar al-Baghdadi were killed in an operation by US and Iraqi forces in Tikrit.

Mujahideen Shura Council (Iraq)

Mujahideen Shura CouncilMujahedeen Shura CouncilMujahedeen Shura Council of Iraq
The Mujahideen Shura Council, which included Al-Qaeda in Iraq and other Iraqi insurgent groups, named Abu Hamza al-Muhajir as their new emir in June 2006.
In November, a statement was issued by Abu Ayyub al-Masri, leader of Mujahideen Shura Council (MSC), announcing the disbanding of the MSC, in favor of the ISI.

Abu Omar al-Baghdadi

Abu Abdullah al-Rashid al-BaghdadiAbu Umar al-BaghdadiDeath of Abu Abdullah al-Rashid al-Baghdadi
After Abu Omar al-Baghdadi's alleged capture by the American forces on 7 March 2007, the media started reporting about al-Masri's standing in the insurgency, and a video tape was released to the media in which al-Masri proclaims al-Baghdadi "the ruler of believers", with Iraqi Qaeda fighters under his command.
ISI Minister of War Abu Ayyub al-Masri and al-Baghdadi's son were also killed in the attack and 16 others were arrested.

Second Battle of Fallujah

Operation Phantom FuryBattle of FallujahFallujah
al-Masri participated in the major 2004 battle of Fallujah.

Tikrit

TagritTikrit, IraqTakrit
On April 18, 2010, Abu Ayyub al-Masri was killed in a joint American and Iraqi operation near Tikrit.
On April 18, 2010, Abu Ayyub al-Masri and Abu Abdullah al-Rashid al-Baghdadi were killed in a raid 10 km of Tikrit in a safe house.

Iraq War

Operation Iraqi FreedomIraqwar in Iraq
On 18 April, U.S. and Iraqi forces killed Abu Ayyub al-Masri the leader of al-Qaeda in Iraq in a joint American and Iraqi operation near Tikrit, Iraq.

Iraqi insurgency (2003–2011)

Iraqi insurgencyIraqi insurgentsinsurgents
Abu Ayyub al-Masri (أبو أيّوب المصري, ', translation: "Father of Ayyub the Egyptian"; 1967 – 18 April 2010), also known as Abu Hamza al-Muhajir (أبو حمزة المهاجر ', translation: "Father of Hamza the immigrant") and other aliases (see name), was the leader of Al-Qaeda in Iraq during the Iraqi insurgency, following the death of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in June 2006.
Abu Ayyub al-Masri, an Egyptian who was trained in Al-Qaeda camps in Afghanistan took his place.

Al-Qaeda

Al Qaedaal-QaidaAl Qaida
Abu Ayyub al-Masri's al-Qaeda movement in Iraq regularly releases short videos glorifying the activity of jihadist suicide bombers.

Egypt

EgyptianEGYArab Republic of Egypt
Born in Egypt, he joined the Muslim Brotherhood and, according to General Caldwell, joined Ayman al-Zawahiri's Egyptian Islamic Jihad in 1982, where he "worked with Zawahiri."

Muslim Brotherhood

the Muslim BrotherhoodMuslim BrothersIslamic brotherhood
Born in Egypt, he joined the Muslim Brotherhood and, according to General Caldwell, joined Ayman al-Zawahiri's Egyptian Islamic Jihad in 1982, where he "worked with Zawahiri."

Ayman al-Zawahiri

Ayman al ZawahiriAyman al-ZawahriAyman Zawahiri
Born in Egypt, he joined the Muslim Brotherhood and, according to General Caldwell, joined Ayman al-Zawahiri's Egyptian Islamic Jihad in 1982, where he "worked with Zawahiri."

Afghanistan

AfghanIslamic Republic of AfghanistanAfghans
Al-Masri went to Afghanistan in 1999, where he attended Osama bin Laden's al-Farouk camp, becoming an expert with explosives. After the American invasion of Afghanistan, al-Masri went to Iraq via the United Arab Emirates in 2002, according to the subsequent account given by his widow.

Osama bin Laden

Bin LadenUsama bin LadenOsama
Al-Masri went to Afghanistan in 1999, where he attended Osama bin Laden's al-Farouk camp, becoming an expert with explosives.

Al Farouq training camp

Al FarouqAl-Farouq campal Farouk training camp
Al-Masri went to Afghanistan in 1999, where he attended Osama bin Laden's al-Farouk camp, becoming an expert with explosives.

Yemen

Republic of YemenYemeniJemen
He married Hasna, a native of Yemen, in the capital Sanaa in 1998 and they had three children.

Sanaa

Sana'aSan'aSana’a
He married Hasna, a native of Yemen, in the capital Sanaa in 1998 and they had three children.

Iraq

Republic of IraqIraqiIrak
After the American invasion of Afghanistan, al-Masri went to Iraq via the United Arab Emirates in 2002, according to the subsequent account given by his widow.

United Arab Emirates

UAEEmiratiUnited Arab Emirates (UAE)
After the American invasion of Afghanistan, al-Masri went to Iraq via the United Arab Emirates in 2002, according to the subsequent account given by his widow.

Euphrates

Euphrates RiverRiver EuphratesFırat River
Soon after, he "worked the ‘rat line’ down the Euphrates River Valley supplying suicide bombers via Syria."

Syria

Syrian Arab RepublicSyrianEtymology of Syria
Soon after, he "worked the ‘rat line’ down the Euphrates River Valley supplying suicide bombers via Syria."