Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay

Best Adapted ScreenplayBest Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another MediumBest Writing, ScreenplayBest Screenplay Based on Material from Another MediumBest ScreenplayAdapted ScreenplayAcademy AwardBest Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or PublishedBest Writing (Adapted Screenplay)Best Writing, Adapted Screenplay
The Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay is one of the Academy Awards, the most prominent film awards in the United States.wikipedia
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Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay

Best Original ScreenplayAcademy AwardBest Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen
See also the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay, a similar award for screenplays that are not adaptations.
See also the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay, a similar award for screenplays that are adaptations.

Joseph L. Mankiewicz

Joseph MankiewiczJosephMankiewicz
The first person to win twice in this category was Joseph L. Mankiewicz, who won the award in two consecutive years, 1949 and 1950.
Mankiewicz had a long Hollywood career, and he twice won the Academy Award for both Best Director and Best Writing, Screenplay for A Letter to Three Wives (1949) and All About Eve (1950).

Nat Faxon

Payne won both awards as part of a writing duo, with Jim Taylor, and writing trio, with Jim Rash and Nat Faxon.
A frequent presence on comedic films and TV series, he won the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay for co-writing The Descendants (2011) and starred in the Fox comedy series Ben and Kate (2012–2013), the FX comedy series Married (2014–2015) and voices Elfo in the Netflix adult animated television series Disenchantment (2018).

Francis Ford Coppola

Francis CoppolaCoppolaCoppola, Francis Ford
Others to win twice in this category include: George Seaton, Robert Bolt (who also won in consecutive years), Francis Ford Coppola, Mario Puzo, Alvin Sargent, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, Alexander Payne and Michael Wilson. Billy Wilder, Charles Brackett, Paddy Chayefsky, Francis Ford Coppola, Horton Foote, William Goldman, Robert Benton, Bo Goldman, and the Coen brothers have won Oscars for both original and adapted screenplays.
His directorial prominence was cemented with the release in 1972 of The Godfather, a film that revolutionized movie-making in the gangster genre, earning praise from both critics and the public before winning three Academy Awards—including his second Oscar (Best Adapted Screenplay, with Mario Puzo), Best Picture, and his first nomination for Best Director.

John Ridley

RidleyThe American Way
Geoffrey S. Fletcher (for Precious: Based on the Novel 'Push' by Sapphire), John Ridley (for 12 Years a Slave), and Barry Jenkins and Tarell Alvin McCraney (both for Moonlight) are the only African-Americans to win in this category; Fletcher is also the first African-American to win in any writing category.
John Ridley IV (born October 1965) is an American screenwriter, television director, novelist, and showrunner, known for 12 Years a Slave, for which he won an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Robert Bolt

Bolt, Robert
Others to win twice in this category include: George Seaton, Robert Bolt (who also won in consecutive years), Francis Ford Coppola, Mario Puzo, Alvin Sargent, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, Alexander Payne and Michael Wilson. Noted novelists and playwrights nominated in this category include: George Bernard Shaw (who shared an award for an adaptation of his play Pygmalion), Graham Greene, Tennessee Williams, Vladimir Nabokov, James Hilton, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Lillian Hellman, Irwin Shaw, James Agee, Norman Corwin, S. J. Perelman, Terence Rattigan, John Osborne, Robert Bolt, Harold Pinter, David Mamet, Larry McMurtry, Arthur Miller, John Irving, David Hare, Tony Kushner, and August Wilson.
Robert Oxton Bolt, CBE (15 August 1924 – 21 February 1995) was an English playwright and a two-time Oscar-winning screenwriter, known for writing the screenplays for Lawrence of Arabia, Doctor Zhivago and A Man for All Seasons, the latter two of which won him the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Billy Bob Thornton

Billy BobBilly Bob Thorton
Winners Billy Bob Thornton and John Huston have only received nominations (not wins) in the acting categories.
Thornton had his first break when he co-wrote and starred in the 1992 thriller One False Move, and received international attention after writing, directing, and starring in the independent drama film Sling Blade (1996), for which he won an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor.

Coen brothers

Joel Coen and Ethan CoenJoel and Ethan CoenJoel Coen
Joel Coen and Ethan Coen are the third winning siblings, for No Country for Old Men. Billy Wilder, Charles Brackett, Paddy Chayefsky, Francis Ford Coppola, Horton Foote, William Goldman, Robert Benton, Bo Goldman, and the Coen brothers have won Oscars for both original and adapted screenplays.
They often alternate top billing for their screenplays while sharing editing credits under the alias Roderick Jaynes. They have been nominated for 13 Academy Awards together, and individually for one award each, winning Best Original Screenplay for Fargo and Best Picture, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay for No Country for Old Men.

James Ivory

Ivory
James Ivory is the oldest person to receive the award, having been 89 years old when he won for Call Me by Your Name.
For his work on Call Me by Your Name (2017), which he wrote and produced, Ivory won awards for Best Adapted Screenplay from the Academy Awards, British Academy of Film and Television Arts, Writers Guild of America, the Critics' Choice Awards, and the Scripter Awards, among others.

Emma Thompson

EmmaBritish actress
Emma Thompson is the only winner who has also won for acting.
Thompson scripted and starred in Sense and Sensibility (1995), which earned her numerous awards, including an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay, which makes her the only person to receive Academy Awards for both acting and writing, and a BAFTA Award for Best Actress.

George Bernard Shaw

Bernard ShawShawG. B. Shaw
Noted novelists and playwrights nominated in this category include: George Bernard Shaw (who shared an award for an adaptation of his play Pygmalion), Graham Greene, Tennessee Williams, Vladimir Nabokov, James Hilton, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Lillian Hellman, Irwin Shaw, James Agee, Norman Corwin, S. J. Perelman, Terence Rattigan, John Osborne, Robert Bolt, Harold Pinter, David Mamet, Larry McMurtry, Arthur Miller, John Irving, David Hare, Tony Kushner, and August Wilson.
In 1938 he provided the screenplay for a filmed version of Pygmalion for which he received an Academy Award.

Billy Wilder

WilderWilder, Billy
Billy Wilder, Charles Brackett, Paddy Chayefsky, Francis Ford Coppola, Horton Foote, William Goldman, Robert Benton, Bo Goldman, and the Coen brothers have won Oscars for both original and adapted screenplays.
Wilder earned the Best Director and Best Screenplay Academy Awards for the adaptation of a Charles R. Jackson story The Lost Weekend (1945), about alcoholism.

S. J. Perelman

S.J. Perelman[S. J.] PerelmanPerelmanesque
Noted novelists and playwrights nominated in this category include: George Bernard Shaw (who shared an award for an adaptation of his play Pygmalion), Graham Greene, Tennessee Williams, Vladimir Nabokov, James Hilton, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Lillian Hellman, Irwin Shaw, James Agee, Norman Corwin, S. J. Perelman, Terence Rattigan, John Osborne, Robert Bolt, Harold Pinter, David Mamet, Larry McMurtry, Arthur Miller, John Irving, David Hare, Tony Kushner, and August Wilson.
Perelman received an Academy Award for screenwriting in 1956.

David Hare (playwright)

David HareSir David Hare David Hare
Noted novelists and playwrights nominated in this category include: George Bernard Shaw (who shared an award for an adaptation of his play Pygmalion), Graham Greene, Tennessee Williams, Vladimir Nabokov, James Hilton, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Lillian Hellman, Irwin Shaw, James Agee, Norman Corwin, S. J. Perelman, Terence Rattigan, John Osborne, Robert Bolt, Harold Pinter, David Mamet, Larry McMurtry, Arthur Miller, John Irving, David Hare, Tony Kushner, and August Wilson.
Best known for his stage work, Hare has also enjoyed great success with films, receiving two Academy Award nominations for Best Adapted Screenplay for writing The Hours' in 2002, based on the novel written by Michael Cunningham, and The Reader' in 2008, based on the novel of the same name written by Bernhard Schlink.

Alexander Payne

Others to win twice in this category include: George Seaton, Robert Bolt (who also won in consecutive years), Francis Ford Coppola, Mario Puzo, Alvin Sargent, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, Alexander Payne and Michael Wilson.
Payne is a two-time winner of the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay, and a three-time nominee of the Academy Award for Best Director.

Robert Benton

Benton
Billy Wilder, Charles Brackett, Paddy Chayefsky, Francis Ford Coppola, Horton Foote, William Goldman, Robert Benton, Bo Goldman, and the Coen brothers have won Oscars for both original and adapted screenplays.
He won the Academy Awards for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Director for Kramer vs. Kramer (1979) and won a third Oscar for Best Original Screenplay for Places in the Heart (1984).

Brokeback Mountain

Brokebackfilm adaptation of the same nameBareback Mountain
Larry McMurtry is the only person who has won (for Brokeback Mountain) for adapting someone else's work and whose work has been adapted by someone else resulting in a win, Terms of Endearment.
The film was nominated for eight Academy Awards, the most nominations at the 78th Academy Awards, where it won three—Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Original Score—though it lost the Best Picture award to Crash in a controversial Oscars upset.

Scott Frank

Scott Frank, James Mangold, and Michael Green, writers of Logan, are the first to be nominated for a film based on superhero comic books (the X-Men).
He has earned two Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay nominations, for Out of Sight (1998) and Logan (2017).

John Irving

Irving
Noted novelists and playwrights nominated in this category include: George Bernard Shaw (who shared an award for an adaptation of his play Pygmalion), Graham Greene, Tennessee Williams, Vladimir Nabokov, James Hilton, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Lillian Hellman, Irwin Shaw, James Agee, Norman Corwin, S. J. Perelman, Terence Rattigan, John Osborne, Robert Bolt, Harold Pinter, David Mamet, Larry McMurtry, Arthur Miller, John Irving, David Hare, Tony Kushner, and August Wilson.
He won the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay in the 72nd Academy Awards (1999) for his script of The Cider House Rules.

No Country for Old Men (film)

No Country for Old Men2007film adaptation
Joel Coen and Ethan Coen are the third winning siblings, for No Country for Old Men.
No Country for Old Men premiered in competition at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival on May 19. The film won 76 awards on 109 nominations across multiple organizations; it won four awards at the 80th Academy Awards – Best Picture, Best Director(s), Best Supporting Actor (Bardem) and Best Adapted Screenplay – three British Academy Film Awards (BAFTAs), including Best Director(s), and two Golden Globes.

Casablanca (film)

CasablancaCasablanca'' (film)Play it again, Sam
Philip G. Epstein and Julius J. Epstein are the first siblings to win in this category, for Casablanca.
Exceeding expectations, Casablanca went on to win the Academy Award for Best Picture, while Curtiz was selected as Best Director and the Epsteins and Koch were honored for writing the Best Adapted Screenplay.

Tony Kushner

Hydriotaphia, or the Death of Dr. BrowneTony Kushner’s
Noted novelists and playwrights nominated in this category include: George Bernard Shaw (who shared an award for an adaptation of his play Pygmalion), Graham Greene, Tennessee Williams, Vladimir Nabokov, James Hilton, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Lillian Hellman, Irwin Shaw, James Agee, Norman Corwin, S. J. Perelman, Terence Rattigan, John Osborne, Robert Bolt, Harold Pinter, David Mamet, Larry McMurtry, Arthur Miller, John Irving, David Hare, Tony Kushner, and August Wilson.
Both films were critically acclaimed, and he received Academy Award nominations for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Mario Puzo

Alfred E. Puzo
Others to win twice in this category include: George Seaton, Robert Bolt (who also won in consecutive years), Francis Ford Coppola, Mario Puzo, Alvin Sargent, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, Alexander Payne and Michael Wilson.
He received the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay for the first film in 1972 and Part II in 1974.

Precious (film)

PreciousPrecious: Based on the Novel "Push" by SapphirePrecious: Based on the Novel 'Push' by Sapphire
Geoffrey S. Fletcher (for Precious: Based on the Novel 'Push' by Sapphire), John Ridley (for 12 Years a Slave), and Barry Jenkins and Tarell Alvin McCraney (both for Moonlight) are the only African-Americans to win in this category; Fletcher is also the first African-American to win in any writing category.
Geoffrey Fletcher won for Best Adapted Screenplay, becoming the first African-American to win a sceenplay award at the Oscars.

Pierre Collings

Pierre Collings and Sheridan Gibney were the first to win for adapting their own work, for The Story of Louis Pasteur.
Their screenplay was adapted from their own work, leading to awards for both Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Story.