Acadia

Acadiel'AcadieHistory of Acadia(New France)Acadia (New France)Acadia militiaAcadia: Governance under the British after 1710Acadianexpulsion of the AcadianFrench Acadia
Acadia (Acadie) was a colony of New France in northeastern North America which included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and Maine to the Kennebec River.wikipedia
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New France

FrenchCanadaNouvelle-France
Acadia (Acadie) was a colony of New France in northeastern North America which included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and Maine to the Kennebec River.
The territory of New France consisted of five colonies at its peak in 1712, each with its own administration: Canada, the most developed colony and divided into the districts of Québec, Trois-Rivières, and Montréal; Hudson's Bay; Acadie in the northeast; Plaisance on the island of Newfoundland; and Louisiane.

Castine, Maine

CastineMajabigwaduceNautilus Island and the Majabagaduce peninsula
During much of the 17th and early 18th centuries, Norridgewock on the Kennebec River and Castine at the end of the Penobscot River were the southernmost settlements of Acadia.
Castine is a town in Hancock County in eastern Maine, USA, which served from 1670 to 1674 as the capital of Acadia.

Acadians

AcadianAcadian settlersFrench
The population of Acadia included the various indigenous First Nations that comprised the Wabanaki Confederacy and descendants of French colonial settlers (Acadians).
The Acadians (Acadiens, ) are the descendants of French colonists who settled in Acadia during the 17th and 18th centuries, some of whom are also descended from the Indigenous peoples of the region.

Port-Royal (Acadia)

Port RoyalPort-RoyalBattle of Port Royal
The first capital of Acadia was established in 1605 as Port-Royal.
Port-Royal was a settlement on the site of modern-day Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, part of the French colony of Acadia.

Norridgewock

KennebecCaniba
During much of the 17th and early 18th centuries, Norridgewock on the Kennebec River and Castine at the end of the Penobscot River were the southernmost settlements of Acadia.
During colonial times, this area was territory disputed between British and French colonists, and was set along the claimed western border of Acadia, the western bank of the Kennebec River.

Maine

MEState of MaineMaine, United States
Acadia (Acadie) was a colony of New France in northeastern North America which included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and Maine to the Kennebec River.
The French named the entire area Acadia, including the portion that later became the state of Maine.

Wabanaki Confederacy

WabanakiWabenakiIndigenous peoples
The population of Acadia included the various indigenous First Nations that comprised the Wabanaki Confederacy and descendants of French colonial settlers (Acadians).
Members of the Wabanaki Confederacy, the Wabanaki peoples, are in and named for the area which they call Wabanahkik ("Dawnland"), roughly the area that became the French colony of Acadia.

Father Le Loutre's War

Father Le Loutre’s Wara guerrilla warengaged in a campaign to consolidate
The British took New Brunswick in Father Le Loutre's War, and they took Île Royale and Île Saint-Jean in 1758 following the French and Indian War.
Father Le Loutre's War (1749–1755), also known as the Indian War, the Micmac War and the Anglo-Micmac War, took place between King George's War and the French and Indian War in Acadia and Nova Scotia.

Queen Anne's War

at this timeEuropean conflictsexpedition against Canada
Acadia was conquered in 1710 during Queen Anne's War, while New Brunswick and much of Maine remained contested territory.
The borders and boundaries remained uncertain between Acadia and New England despite battles along the border throughout King William's War.

King William's War

1688Indian warsSecond Indian War
There were six colonial wars in a 74-year period in which British interests tried to capture Acadia, starting with King William's War in 1689.
New France and the Wabanaki Confederacy were able to thwart New England expansion into Acadia, whose border New France defined as the Kennebec River in southern Maine.

Acadiana

Cajun Countrysouthern LouisianaCajun Heartland
It can also refer to the Acadian diaspora in southern Louisiana, a region also referred to as Acadiana.
Many are of Acadian descent and now identify as Cajuns or Louisiana Creoles.

The Maritimes

MaritimesMaritime ProvincesCanadian Maritimes
Acadia (Acadie) was a colony of New France in northeastern North America which included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and Maine to the Kennebec River.
Champlain's success in the region, which came to be called Acadie, led to the fertile tidal marshes surrounding the southeastern and northeastern reaches of the Bay of Fundy being populated by French immigrants who called themselves Acadien.

Cajuns

CajunAcadiansCajun American
It can also refer to the Acadian diaspora in southern Louisiana, a region also referred to as Acadiana.
The Cajuns (Louisiana French: les Cadiens), also known as Acadians (Louisiana French: les Acadiens), are an ethnic group mainly living in the U.S. state of Louisiana, and in the Canadian maritimes provinces as well as Quebec consisting in part of the descendants of the original Acadian exiles—French-speakers from Acadia (L'Acadie) in what are now the Maritimes of Eastern Canada.

Siege of Port Royal (1710)

Conquest of AcadiaSiege of Port Royalcapture
A British force from Virginia attacked and burned down the town in 1613, but it was later rebuilt nearby, where it remained the longest-serving capital of French Acadia until the British Siege of Port Royal in 1710. After the British Siege of Port Royal in 1710, mainland Nova Scotia was under the control of British colonial government, but both present-day New Brunswick and virtually all of present-day Maine remained contested territory between New England and New France.
Port Royal was the capital of the French colony of Acadia almost since the French first began settling the area in 1604.

French and Indian War

French & Indian WarFrench and IndianSeven Years' War
The British took New Brunswick in Father Le Loutre's War, and they took Île Royale and Île Saint-Jean in 1758 following the French and Indian War.
In 1755, the British captured Fort Beauséjour on the border separating Nova Scotia from Acadia, and they ordered the expulsion of the Acadians (1755–64) soon afterwards.

Samuel de Champlain

ChamplainSamuel ChamplainChamplain Monument
Samuel de Champlain fixed its present orthography with the r omitted, and cartographer William Francis Ganong has shown its gradual progress northeastwards to its resting place in the Atlantic provinces of Canada.
From 1604 to 1607, he participated in the exploration and settlement of the first permanent European settlement north of Florida, Port Royal, Acadia (1605), as well as the first European settlement that would become Saint John, New Brunswick (1604).

Kennebec River

KennebecAtkins BayKennebec River Valley
Acadia (Acadie) was a colony of New France in northeastern North America which included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and Maine to the Kennebec River.
In 1605, Samuel de Champlain navigated the coast of what is now Maine, charting the land and rivers of what was then called New France, L'Acadie including the Kennebec as far up as Bath, as well as the St. Croix, and Penobscot rivers The Abenaki village of Norridgewock was located on the Kennebec in the 1600s.

Nova Scotia

NSNova Scotia, CanadaNova Scotian
Concerned about their overland supply lines to Quebec, they first raided the British fishing port of Canso on May 23, and then organized an attack on Annapolis Royal, then the capital of Nova Scotia.
In 1605, French colonists established the first permanent European settlement in the future Canada (and the first north of Florida) at Port Royal, founding what would become known as Acadia.

Henry IV of France

Henry IVHenri IVHenry of Navarre
Henry IV of France chartered a colony south of the St. Lawrence River between the 40th and 46th parallels in 1603, and he recognized it as La Cadie.
During his reign, the French colonization of the Americas truly began with the foundation of the colony of Acadia and its capital Port-Royal.

New Brunswick

NBProvince of New BrunswickNew Brunswick, Canada
After the British Siege of Port Royal in 1710, mainland Nova Scotia was under the control of British colonial government, but both present-day New Brunswick and virtually all of present-day Maine remained contested territory between New England and New France.
By the early 1700s the French settlements formed a part of the Acadia, a colonial division of New France.

First Nations

First NationNorth American IndianIndian
The population of Acadia included the various indigenous First Nations that comprised the Wabanaki Confederacy and descendants of French colonial settlers (Acadians).
Acadia became France's most successful colony to that time.

Port-Royal National Historic Site

Port RoyalHabitation at Port-RoyalPort-Royal
The following year, the settlement was moved across the Bay of Fundy to Port Royal after a difficult winter on the island and deaths from scurvy.
Port-Royal served as the capital of Acadia until its destruction by British military forces in 1613.

Jurriaen Aernoutsz

Dutch
During the first 80 years, the French and Acadians were in Acadia, there were ten significant battles as the English, Scottish, Dutch and French fought for possession of the colony.
Jurriaen Aernoutsz (or Aernouts) was a Dutch colonial navy captain, who briefly conquered the capital of Acadia, Fort Pentagouet in Penobscot Bay (present day Castine, Maine) and several other villages, and renamed the colony New Holland during the Franco-Dutch War.

Charles de Menou d'Aulnay

The war was between Port Royal, where the Governor of Acadia Charles de Menou d'Aulnay de Charnisay was stationed, and present-day Saint John, New Brunswick, where Governor of Acadia Charles de Saint-Étienne de la Tour was stationed.
Charles de Menou d'Aulnay (c. 1604–1650) was a pioneer of European settlement in North America and Governor of Acadia (1635–1650).

Isle Saint-Jean

Île Saint-JeanIle Saint-Jean
In the 18th century, some Acadians migrated to nearby Île Saint-Jean (now Prince Edward Island) to take advantage of the fertile cropland.
After 1713, France engaged in a reaffirmation of its territory in Acadia.