Acadian Exodus

an exodusleavingleft Nova Scotia
The Acadian Exodus (also known as the Acadian migration) happened during Father Le Loutre's War (1749–1755) and involved almost half of the total Acadian population of Nova Scotia deciding to relocate to French controlled territories.wikipedia
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Father Le Loutre's War

Father Le Loutre’s Wara guerrilla warengaged in a campaign to consolidate
The Acadian Exodus (also known as the Acadian migration) happened during Father Le Loutre's War (1749–1755) and involved almost half of the total Acadian population of Nova Scotia deciding to relocate to French controlled territories.
During the war, the Acadians and Mi'kmaq left Nova Scotia for the French colonies of Ile St. Jean (Prince Edward Island) and Ile Royale (Cape Breton Island).

Joseph-Nicolas Gautier

A prominent Acadian who transported Acadians to Ile St. Jean and Ile Royal was Joseph-Nicolas Gautier.
In the latter war, Gautier was particularly instrumental in the Acadian Exodus.

Fort Edward (Nova Scotia)

Fort EdwardFort Edward National Historic SiteFort Edward, Nova Scotia
The Acadian Exodus began in 1749 primarily because the Acadians were resisting the British firmly taking control of peninsular Nova Scotia through establishing Halifax and, within eighteen months, building fortifications in the major Acadian communities: present-day Windsor (Fort Edward); Grand-Pré (Fort Vieux Logis) and Chignecto (Fort Lawrence).
The British built the fort to help prevent the Acadian Exodus from the region.

Windsor, Nova Scotia

WindsorTown of WindsorTownship of Windsor
The Acadian Exodus began in 1749 primarily because the Acadians were resisting the British firmly taking control of peninsular Nova Scotia through establishing Halifax and, within eighteen months, building fortifications in the major Acadian communities: present-day Windsor (Fort Edward); Grand-Pré (Fort Vieux Logis) and Chignecto (Fort Lawrence).
Cobequid remained without a fort.) Many Acadians left this region in the Acadian Exodus, which preceded the Expulsion of the Acadians.

Grand-Pré, Nova Scotia

Grand-PréGrand PréGrand Pre
The Acadian Exodus began in 1749 primarily because the Acadians were resisting the British firmly taking control of peninsular Nova Scotia through establishing Halifax and, within eighteen months, building fortifications in the major Acadian communities: present-day Windsor (Fort Edward); Grand-Pré (Fort Vieux Logis) and Chignecto (Fort Lawrence).
During Father Le Loutre's War, the Acadians at Grand-Pré played a significant role in supporting the Acadian Exodus out of mainland Nova Scotia, which started in 1749.

Siege of Grand Pré

Siege of Grand Preattacked Fort Vieux LogisGrand Pré
During this period, Mi'kmaq and Acadians attacked Fort Vieux Logis, they made numerous attacks on Dartmouth, numerous attacks on peninsular Halifax, and engaged in various conflicts at Fort Lawrence (Chignecto).
One historian states that the intent of the siege was to help facilitate the Acadian Exodus from the region.

Jean-Louis Le Loutre

Abbe Le LoutreAbbe LeLoutreFather Le Loutre
The leader of the Exodus was Father Jean-Louis Le Loutre, whom the British gave the code name "Moses".

Fort Vieux Logis

The Acadian Exodus began in 1749 primarily because the Acadians were resisting the British firmly taking control of peninsular Nova Scotia through establishing Halifax and, within eighteen months, building fortifications in the major Acadian communities: present-day Windsor (Fort Edward); Grand-Pré (Fort Vieux Logis) and Chignecto (Fort Lawrence).
Cobequid remained without a fort.) The fort was created to help prevent the Acadian Exodus from the region.

Noel, Nova Scotia

Noel
This action precipitated Doiron leaving Noel, Nova Scotia for Point Prime, Île Saint-Jean in the spring of 1750.) The British eventually forbade all assemblies of the Acadians, and they were ordered to supply the British commanders with provisions and offer their labor on demand, at prices set by regulation.
At the beginning of Father Le Loutre's War, Noel Doiron and many others joined the Acadian Exodus from mainland Nova Scotia to the French colony of Ile St. Jean (i.e., Prince Edward Island).

Noël Doiron

Noel Doiron
(On one such patrol, Noel Doiron's priest Jacques Girard was arrested.
Early in 1750, Noel Doiron and his family joined the Acadian Exodus and left mainland Nova Scotia for Pointe Prime, Ile St. Jean (present day Eldon, Prince Edward Island).

Military history of the Acadians

Acadian militiaAcadia militiaAcadians
During the war, Acadians revealed their political allegiance by leaving mainland Nova Scotia.

Acadians

AcadianAcadian settlersFrench
The Acadian Exodus (also known as the Acadian migration) happened during Father Le Loutre's War (1749–1755) and involved almost half of the total Acadian population of Nova Scotia deciding to relocate to French controlled territories.

Nova Scotia

NSNova Scotia, CanadaNova Scotian
The Acadian Exodus (also known as the Acadian migration) happened during Father Le Loutre's War (1749–1755) and involved almost half of the total Acadian population of Nova Scotia deciding to relocate to French controlled territories.

Isthmus of Chignecto

ChignectoChignecto IsthmusRaid on Chignecto
The Acadian Exodus began in 1749 primarily because the Acadians were resisting the British firmly taking control of peninsular Nova Scotia through establishing Halifax and, within eighteen months, building fortifications in the major Acadian communities: present-day Windsor (Fort Edward); Grand-Pré (Fort Vieux Logis) and Chignecto (Fort Lawrence). The three primary destinations were: the west side of the Mesagoueche River in the Chignecto region, Isle Saint-Jean and Île-Royale. The land route went through Chignecto, along the Bay of Fundy and up the Saint John River.

Isle Saint-Jean

Île Saint-JeanIle Saint-Jean
The three primary destinations were: the west side of the Mesagoueche River in the Chignecto region, Isle Saint-Jean and Île-Royale.

Île-Royale (New France)

Île-RoyaleÎle RoyaleIle Royale
The three primary destinations were: the west side of the Mesagoueche River in the Chignecto region, Isle Saint-Jean and Île-Royale.

Moses

MosaicMosheMusa
The leader of the Exodus was Father Jean-Louis Le Loutre, whom the British gave the code name "Moses".

Roland-Michel Barrin de La Galissonière

Governor la GalissonnièreMarquis de la GalissonnièreComte de la Galissoniere
Le Loutre acted in conjunction with Governor of New France Roland-Michel Barrin de La Galissonière who encouraged the Acadian migration.

Foreign Protestants

EuropeansForeign ProtestantGerman Foreign Protestant
Along with Acadians, Mi'kmaq and Foreign Protestants joined in the Exodus from Nova Scotia.

Siege of Port Royal (1710)

Conquest of AcadiaSiege of Port Royalcapture
Despite the British conquest of Acadia in 1710, Acadia was dominated by Catholic Acadians and Mi'kmaq.

Siege of Louisbourg (1745)

Siege of Louisbourg1745 expeditionBattle of Louisburg
(The first deportation of the Acadians happened when they were expelled from present day Cape Breton after the Siege of Louisbourg (1745).) Acadians left peninsular Nova Scotia to protest Edward Cornwallis' demand that they take an unconditional oath.

Edward Cornwallis

EdwardCornwallisGeneral Cornwallis
(The first deportation of the Acadians happened when they were expelled from present day Cape Breton after the Siege of Louisbourg (1745).) Acadians left peninsular Nova Scotia to protest Edward Cornwallis' demand that they take an unconditional oath.

Fort Lawrence (Nova Scotia)

Fort LawrenceBeaubassinFort Lawrence NHS
The Acadian Exodus began in 1749 primarily because the Acadians were resisting the British firmly taking control of peninsular Nova Scotia through establishing Halifax and, within eighteen months, building fortifications in the major Acadian communities: present-day Windsor (Fort Edward); Grand-Pré (Fort Vieux Logis) and Chignecto (Fort Lawrence).

Annapolis Royal

Annapolis Royal, Nova ScotiaAnnapolis, Nova ScotiaAnnapolis
(Of course, a British fort already existed at the other major Acadian centre of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia.

Saint John River (Bay of Fundy)

Saint John RiverSt. John RiverSaint John
The land route went through Chignecto, along the Bay of Fundy and up the Saint John River.