Accusative case

accusativeacc.ACCObjectAaccusative formaccusative singularobjective(accusative)accusative of motion towards
The accusative case (abbreviated ) of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a transitive verb.wikipedia
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List of glossing abbreviations

abbreviatedglossing abbreviationglossing abbreviations
The accusative case (abbreviated ) of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a transitive verb.

Grammatical case

casecasescase marking
The accusative case (abbreviated ) of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a transitive verb.
English has largely lost its inflected case system although personal pronouns still have three cases, which are simplified forms of the nominative, accusative and genitive cases.

Morphosyntactic alignment

alignmentcore relationdistinguishing between their relations
In morphosyntactic alignment terms, both perform the accusative function, but the accusative object is telic, while the partitive is not.
The name derived from the nominative and accusative cases.

Partitive case

partitivepartitivelypart.
Balto-Finnic languages, such as Finnish and Estonian, have two cases to mark objects, the accusative and the partitive case.
As an example of the irresultative meaning of the partitive, ammuin karhun (accusative) means "I shot the bear (dead)", whereas ammuin karhua (partitive) means "I shot (at) the bear" without specifying if it was even hit.

Declension

declinedcasecases
Modern English almost entirely lacks declension in its nouns; pronouns, however, have an oblique case as in whom, them, and her, which merges the accusative and dative functions, and originates in old Germanic dative forms (see Declension in English).
Declensions may apply to nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, and articles to indicate number (e.g. singular, dual, plural), case (e.g. nominative case, accusative case, genitive case, dative case), gender (e.g. masculine, neuter, feminine), and a number of other grammatical categories.

Latin declension

genitive casedeclensionsecond declension
For the accusative endings, see Latin declensions.
A complete Latin noun declension consists of up to seven grammatical cases: nominative, vocative, accusative, genitive, dative, ablative and locative.

Oblique case

obliqueobjectiveobjective case
Modern English almost entirely lacks declension in its nouns; pronouns, however, have an oblique case as in whom, them, and her, which merges the accusative and dative functions, and originates in old Germanic dative forms (see Declension in English).
The term objective case is generally preferred by modern English grammarians, where it supplanted Old English's dative and accusative.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Modern English almost entirely lacks declension in its nouns; pronouns, however, have an oblique case as in whom, them, and her, which merges the accusative and dative functions, and originates in old Germanic dative forms (see Declension in English).
The subjective case corresponds to the Old English nominative case, and the objective case is used both in the sense of the previous accusative case (in the role of patient, or direct object of a transitive verb), and in the sense of the Old English dative case (in the role of a recipient or indirect object of a transitive verb).

German language

GermanGerman-languageGerman-speaking
The accusative case is typical of early Indo-European languages and still exists in some of them (including Latin, Sanskrit, Greek, German, Polish, Russian), in the Finno-Ugric languages, and in Semitic languages (such as Arabic).

Preposition and postposition

prepositionpostpositionprepositions
The same case is used in many languages for the objects of (some or all) prepositions.

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
The accusative case is typical of early Indo-European languages and still exists in some of them (including Latin, Sanskrit, Greek, German, Polish, Russian), in the Finno-Ugric languages, and in Semitic languages (such as Arabic). It is a noun that is having something done to it, usually joined (such as in Latin) with the nominative case.

Nominative case

nominativenom.NOM
It is a noun that is having something done to it, usually joined (such as in Latin) with the nominative case. The accusative is identical either to the nominative or the genitive, except for personal pronouns and the personal interrogative pronoun kuka/ken, which have a special accusative form ending in -t.
English still retains some nominative pronouns, which are contrasted with the accusative (comparable to the oblique or disjunctive in some other languages): I (accusative me), we (accusative us), he (accusative him), she (accusative her), they (accusative them) and who (accusative whom).

Transitive verb

transitivetransitive verbstransitivity
The accusative case (abbreviated ) of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a transitive verb.
* Accept a direct object (in accusative in the positive form, and in genitive in the negative form)

Arabic

Arabic languageArabic-languageArab
The accusative case is typical of early Indo-European languages and still exists in some of them (including Latin, Sanskrit, Greek, German, Polish, Russian), in the Finno-Ugric languages, and in Semitic languages (such as Arabic).
Nouns in Literary Arabic have three grammatical cases (nominative, accusative, and genitive [also used when the noun is governed by a preposition]); three numbers (singular, dual and plural); two genders (masculine and feminine); and three "states" (indefinite, definite, and construct).

Semitic languages

SemiticSemitic languageArabian
The accusative case is typical of early Indo-European languages and still exists in some of them (including Latin, Sanskrit, Greek, German, Polish, Russian), in the Finno-Ugric languages, and in Semitic languages (such as Arabic).
The proto-Semitic three-case system (nominative, accusative and genitive) with differing vowel endings (-u, -a -i), fully preserved in Qur'anic Arabic (see ʾIʿrab), Akkadian and Ugaritic, has disappeared everywhere in the many colloquial forms of Semitic languages.

Ido language

IdoIdistconferences
In Ido the -n suffix is optional, as subject-verb-object order is assumed when it is not present.
Esperanto's inventor, L. L. Zamenhof, having heard a number of complaints, had suggested in 1894 a proposal for a Reformed Esperanto with several changes that Ido adopted and made it closer to French: eliminating the accented letters and the accusative case, changing the plural to an Italianesque -i, and replacing the table of correlatives with more Latinate words.

Esperanto grammar

grammarComparative ''theEsperanto
Esperanto grammar involves only two cases, a nominative and an accusative.
Nouns and adjectives have two cases, nominative/oblique and accusative/allative, and two numbers, singular and plural; the adjectival form of personal pronouns behaves like a genitive case.

Finnic languages

FinnicFinnic languageBaltic-Finnic
Balto-Finnic languages, such as Finnish and Estonian, have two cases to mark objects, the accusative and the partitive case.

Telicity

telicatelicatelic verbs
In morphosyntactic alignment terms, both perform the accusative function, but the accusative object is telic, while the partitive is not.
In Finnish, the telicity is mandatorily marked on the object: the accusative is telic, and the partitive is used to express atelicity.

Animacy

animateinanimateanimacy hierarchy
In the masculine, Russian also distinguishes between animate and inanimate nouns with regard to the accusative; only the animates carry a marker in this case.
Because of the similarities in morphology of feminine and masculine grammatical gender inflections in Indo-European languages, there is a theory that in an early stage, the Proto-Indo-European language had only two grammatical genders: "animate" and "inanimate/neuter"; the most obvious difference being that inanimate/neuter nouns used the same form for the nominative, vocative, and accusative noun cases.

Nota accusativi

*Nota accusativi
Nota accusativi is a grammatical term meaning "denoting accusative case".

German articles

definite articleGermanGerman article
The masculine forms for German articles, e.g., 'the', 'a/an', 'my', etc., change in the accusative case: they always end in -en.

Geʽez

Ge'ezEthiopicGe'ez language
It is preserved today only in Modern Standard Arabic and Ge'ez.
Objects of verbs show accusative case marked with the suffix /-a/:

Genitive case

genitivegen.GEN
The accusative is identical either to the nominative or the genitive, except for personal pronouns and the personal interrogative pronoun kuka/ken, which have a special accusative form ending in -t.
A complication in Finnic languages is that the accusative case -(e)n is homophonic to the genitive case.

German pronouns

GermanGerman pronoun
Some German pronouns also change in the accusative case.