Acetate disc

acetateacetatesacetate discslacquer discacetate recordslacquer cuttingtranscriptionslacquerlacquer discslacquers
An acetate disc is a type of phonograph (gramophone) record, a mechanical sound storage medium, widely used from the 1930s to the late 1950s for recording and broadcast purposes and still in limited use today.wikipedia
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Phonograph record

vinyl7LP
An acetate disc is a type of phonograph (gramophone) record, a mechanical sound storage medium, widely used from the 1930s to the late 1950s for recording and broadcast purposes and still in limited use today.
Only two producers of lacquers (acetate discs) remain: Apollo Masters in California, and MDC in Japan.

Dubplate

dubplatesdub platedub plates
They are also known as a lacquer (a technically correct term preferred by engineers in the recording industry), test acetate, dubplate (a term originating from Jamaican sound system culture), or transcription disc (a special recording intended for, or made from, a radio broadcast).
A dubplate is an acetate disc usually of 10 inches diameter, traditionally used by studios to test recordings prior to mastering for the subsequent pressing of a vinyl record, but pioneered by reggae sound systems as a way to play exclusive music.

Electrical transcription

transcription disctranscriptionselectrical transcriptions
They are also known as a lacquer (a technically correct term preferred by engineers in the recording industry), test acetate, dubplate (a term originating from Jamaican sound system culture), or transcription disc (a special recording intended for, or made from, a radio broadcast).
Some unusual records which are not broadcast-related are sometimes mistakenly described as "transcription discs" because they were recorded on the so-called acetate recording blanks used for broadcast transcriptions or share some other physical characteristic with them.

Lacquer

lacqueredlacquersnitrocellulose lacquer
Although once produced in a wide range of sizes (from less than 7 in to more than 16 in in diameter) and sometimes with glass core discs, the examples most commonly encountered today are 10, in diameter and consist of an aluminium core disc coated with black nitrocellulose lacquer, commonly but incorrectly called "acetate". They consist of an aluminum disc with a coating of nitrocellulose lacquer.

The Velvet Underground & Nico

The Velvet Underground and Nicodebut albumVelvet Underground and Nico
An acetate from The Velvet Underground, containing music that would later appear on their first album The Velvet Underground & Nico, sold on eBay in 2006 for $25,200.
Soon after recording, Dolph sent an acetate disc of the recordings to Columbia in an attempt to interest them in distributing the album, but they declined, as did Atlantic Records and Elektra Records—according to Morrison, Atlantic objected to the references to drugs in Reed's songs, while Elektra disliked Cale's viola.

Acetate

diacetateacetatesacetate ion
Despite their name, professional grade "acetate" discs do not contain any acetate.
In fact, "acetate" is jargon for cellulose acetate, which is used in the production of fibres or diverse products, e.g. the acetate discs used in audio record production.

Direct metal mastering

DMMpress a metal copy of the disk
The actual stamper sets can be made either from oversized lacquers or from DMM blanks (see Direct Metal Mastering).

Aluminum disc

aluminum diskaluminumaluminium transcription discs
They consist of an aluminum disc with a coating of nitrocellulose lacquer.
In 1934, the Pyral Company in France and the Presto Recording Corporation in the United States independently created the so-called acetate disc by coating a layer of nitrocellulose lacquer onto the aluminum, which now served only as a rigid support.

Sound system (Jamaican)

sound systemsound systemsJamaican sound system
They are also known as a lacquer (a technically correct term preferred by engineers in the recording industry), test acetate, dubplate (a term originating from Jamaican sound system culture), or transcription disc (a special recording intended for, or made from, a radio broadcast).

Mastering (audio)

masteringmasteredaudio mastering
Acetates are usually made by dubbing from a master recording in another medium, such as magnetic tape.

Magnetic tape

tapetapesanalog tape
Acetates are usually made by dubbing from a master recording in another medium, such as magnetic tape. Before the introduction of magnetic tape for mastering, disc recording was done "live" (see direct to disc recording), although sometimes intermediate disc-to-disc editing procedures were involved.

Electroforming

electroformedelectro-formedelectroform
In the vinyl record manufacturing process, an acetate master disc is cut and electroforming is used to make negative metal molds from it; each mold, known as a stamper, can be used to press thousands of vinyl copies of the master.

Record press

pressedpresspressing
In the vinyl record manufacturing process, an acetate master disc is cut and electroforming is used to make negative metal molds from it; each mold, known as a stamper, can be used to press thousands of vinyl copies of the master.

Cellulose acetate

acetateCellonacetate microfilm
Although once produced in a wide range of sizes (from less than 7 in to more than 16 in in diameter) and sometimes with glass core discs, the examples most commonly encountered today are 10, in diameter and consist of an aluminium core disc coated with black nitrocellulose lacquer, commonly but incorrectly called "acetate".

Direct-to-disc recording

direct-to-discdirect to disc recordingdirect to disc
Before the introduction of magnetic tape for mastering, disc recording was done "live" (see direct to disc recording), although sometimes intermediate disc-to-disc editing procedures were involved.

Radio broadcasting

radio stationradio stationsstation
Acetates were widely used in radio broadcasting to archive live broadcasts, pre-record local programming, delay network feeds for broadcast at a later time, and provide programming "from home" on the Armed Forces Radio Network.

American Forces Network

Armed Forces RadioArmed Forces NetworkArmed Forces Radio Service
Acetates were widely used in radio broadcasting to archive live broadcasts, pre-record local programming, delay network feeds for broadcast at a later time, and provide programming "from home" on the Armed Forces Radio Network.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
Disc recorders designed for amateur home use began appearing on the market in around 1940, but their high prices limited sales, and then World War II brought their production to a halt.

Traveling carnival

travelling funfaircarnivalfunfair
It was not unusual for a carnival, circus, amusement park, or transit hub to offer disc recording in a booth for a modest fee.

Circus

circusescircus performerbig top
It was not unusual for a carnival, circus, amusement park, or transit hub to offer disc recording in a booth for a modest fee.

Amusement park

theme parktheme parksamusement parks
It was not unusual for a carnival, circus, amusement park, or transit hub to offer disc recording in a booth for a modest fee.

Transport hub

transportation hubhubtransit center
It was not unusual for a carnival, circus, amusement park, or transit hub to offer disc recording in a booth for a modest fee.

Yugoslavia

YugoslavJugoslaviaHistory of Yugoslavia
This relatively bulky equipment, and the bulky discs, were hauled to remote locations such as Yugoslavia (see Milman Parry) or the Mississippi Delta (see Archive of American Folk Song) by ethnographers, linguists, and musical researchers.

Milman Parry

ParryParry, Milman
This relatively bulky equipment, and the bulky discs, were hauled to remote locations such as Yugoslavia (see Milman Parry) or the Mississippi Delta (see Archive of American Folk Song) by ethnographers, linguists, and musical researchers.

Mississippi Delta

DeltaDelta regionthe Delta
This relatively bulky equipment, and the bulky discs, were hauled to remote locations such as Yugoslavia (see Milman Parry) or the Mississippi Delta (see Archive of American Folk Song) by ethnographers, linguists, and musical researchers.