Achilles

Achilleustragic championA'''chillesAchilles and TroilusAkhillesAchilleAchilleasAchilles InjuryAchillies the SecondAkhilleus
In Greek mythology, Achilles or Achilleus was a hero of the Trojan War, the greatest of all the Greek warriors, and is the central character of Homer's Iliad.wikipedia
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Iliad

The IliadIlliadIlias
In Greek mythology, Achilles or Achilleus was a hero of the Trojan War, the greatest of all the Greek warriors, and is the central character of Homer's Iliad.
Set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy (Ilium) by a coalition of Greek states, it tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles.

Homer

HomericHomeric epicsHomeric poems
In Greek mythology, Achilles or Achilleus was a hero of the Trojan War, the greatest of all the Greek warriors, and is the central character of Homer's Iliad.
It focuses on a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles lasting a few weeks during the last year of the war.

Peleus

PêleaPēleusPēleús
He was the son of the Nereid Thetis and Peleus, king of Phthia. Achilles was the son of the Nereid Thetis and of Peleus, the king of the Myrmidons.
In Greek mythology, Peleus (Ancient Greek: Πηλεύς Pēleus, "muddy" ) was a hero, king of Phthia and the father of Achilles.

Trojan War

Fall of TroySiege of TroyTroy
In Greek mythology, Achilles or Achilleus was a hero of the Trojan War, the greatest of all the Greek warriors, and is the central character of Homer's Iliad.
After the deaths of many heroes, including the Achaeans Achilles and Ajax, and the Trojans Hector and Paris, the city fell to the ruse of the Trojan Horse.

Achilles' heel

Achilles heelAchillesAchilles’ heel
Alluding to these legends, the term "Achilles' heel" has come to mean a point of weakness, especially in someone or something with an otherwise strong constitution.
In Greek mythology, when Achilles was a baby, it was foretold that he would die young.

Achilleid

Achilleis
Later legends (beginning with Statius' unfinished epic Achilleid, written in the 1st century AD) state that Achilles was invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel because, when his mother Thetis dipped him in the river Styx as an infant, she held him by one of his heels.
The Achilleid (Achilleis) is an unfinished epic poem by Publius Papinius Statius that was intended to present the life of Achilles from his youth to his death at Troy.

Paris (mythology)

ParisParis of TroyAlexander
Although the death of Achilles is not presented in the Iliad, other sources concur that he was killed near the end of the Trojan War by Paris, who shot him in the heel with an arrow.
Later in the war, he fatally wounds Achilles in the heel with an arrow as foretold by Achilles’s mother, Thetis.

Thetis

ThetysPeleussea-nymph
He was the son of the Nereid Thetis and Peleus, king of Phthia. Later legends (beginning with Statius' unfinished epic Achilleid, written in the 1st century AD) state that Achilles was invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel because, when his mother Thetis dipped him in the river Styx as an infant, she held him by one of his heels. Achilles was the son of the Nereid Thetis and of Peleus, the king of the Myrmidons. Achilles' descent from the Nereid Thetis and a similarity of his name with those of river deities such as Acheron and Achelous have led to speculations about him being an old water divinity (see below Worship).
In the Trojan War cycle of myth, the wedding of Thetis and the Greek hero Peleus is one of the precipitating events in the war which also led to the birth of their child Achilles.

Phthia

PhthiotisPhtia
He was the son of the Nereid Thetis and Peleus, king of Phthia.
It is frequently mentioned in Homer's Iliad as the home of the Myrmidones, the contingent led by Achilles in the Trojan War.

Myrmidons

MyrmidonMyrmidoneslegendary warriors
Achilles was the son of the Nereid Thetis and of Peleus, the king of the Myrmidons.
In Homer's Iliad, the Myrmidons are the soldiers commanded by Achilles.

Nereid

Nereidssea nymphsNereides
He was the son of the Nereid Thetis and Peleus, king of Phthia. Achilles was the son of the Nereid Thetis and of Peleus, the king of the Myrmidons. Achilles' descent from the Nereid Thetis and a similarity of his name with those of river deities such as Acheron and Achelous have led to speculations about him being an old water divinity (see below Worship).
The most notable of them are Thetis, wife of Peleus and mother of Achilles; Amphitrite, wife of Poseidon and mother of Triton; and Galatea, the vain love interest of the Cyclops Polyphemus.They symbolized everything that is beautiful and kind about the sea.

Greek mythology

GreekGreek mythmythological
In Greek mythology, Achilles or Achilleus was a hero of the Trojan War, the greatest of all the Greek warriors, and is the central character of Homer's Iliad.
Previously existing myths, such as those of Achilles and Patroclus, also then were cast in a pederastic light.

Troy

TrojanTrojansIlium
Achilles' most notable feat during the Trojan War was the slaying of the Trojan prince Hector outside the gates of Troy.
Alexander the Great, for example, visited the site in 334 BC and there made sacrifices at tombs associated with the Homeric heroes Achilles and Patroclus.

Neoptolemus

PyrrhusNeoptolemosPirrus
With Lycomedes' daughter Deidamia, whom in the account of Statius he rapes, Achilles there fathers a son, Neoptolemus (also called Pyrrhus, after his father's possible alias).
Neoptolemus (Ancient Greek: Νεοπτόλεμος, Neoptolemos, "new warrior"), also called Pyrrhus (Πύρρος, Pyrrhos, "red", for his red hair), was the son of the warrior Achilles and the princess Deidamia in Greek mythology, and also the mythical progenitor of the ruling dynasty of the Molossians of ancient Epirus.

Larissa

LarisaLarissa, GreeceArchbishop of Larissa
Legend has it that Achilles was born here.

Gladiatrix

female gladiatorfemale gladiatorsgladiatrices
The name grew more popular, even becoming common soon after the seventh century BC and was also turned into the female form Ἀχιλλεία (Achilleía), attested in Attica in the fourth century BC (IG II² 1617) and, in the form Achillia, on a stele in Halicarnassus as the name of a female gladiator fighting an "Amazon".
One is identified as Amazon and the other as Achillia; their warlike "stage names" allude to the mythical tribe of warrior-women, and the warrior-hero Achilles.

Telephus

TelephosTelaphus
When the Greeks left for the Trojan War, they accidentally stopped in Mysia, ruled by King Telephus.
Telephus was wounded by Achilles when the Achaeans came to his kingdom on their way to sack Troy and bring Helen back to Sparta, and later healed by Achilles.

Cypria

KypriaHegesias (or Hegesinus) of SalamisHegesias of Salamis
Also, in the fragmentary poems of the Epic Cycle in which one can find description of the hero's death (i.e. the Cypria, the Little Iliad by Lesches of Pyrrha, the Aithiopis and Iliou persis by Arctinus of Miletus), there is no trace of any reference to his general invulnerability or his famous weakness at the heel; in the later vase paintings presenting the death of Achilles, the arrow (or in many cases, arrows) hit his torso. According to the Cypria (the part of the Epic Cycle that tells the events of the Trojan War before Achilles' wrath), when the Achaeans desired to return home, they were restrained by Achilles, who afterwards attacked the cattle of Aeneas, sacked neighbouring cities (like Pedasus and Lyrnessus, where the Greeks capture the queen Briseis) and killed Tenes, a son of Apollo, as well as Priam's son Troilus in the sanctuary of Apollo Thymbraios; however, the romance between Troilus and Chryseis described in Geoffrey Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde and in William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida is a medieval invention.
"The author of the Kypria already regarded the Iliad as a text. Any reading of the Kypria will show it preparing for events for (specifically) the Iliad in order to refer back to them, for instance the sale of Lykaon to Lemnos or the kitting out of Achilles with Briseis and Agamemnon with Chryseis".

Potamoi

river godsriver godPotamus
Achilles' descent from the Nereid Thetis and a similarity of his name with those of river deities such as Acheron and Achelous have led to speculations about him being an old water divinity (see below Worship).

Briseis

BriseidaBreseydaBrisêis
According to the Cypria (the part of the Epic Cycle that tells the events of the Trojan War before Achilles' wrath), when the Achaeans desired to return home, they were restrained by Achilles, who afterwards attacked the cattle of Aeneas, sacked neighbouring cities (like Pedasus and Lyrnessus, where the Greeks capture the queen Briseis) and killed Tenes, a son of Apollo, as well as Priam's son Troilus in the sanctuary of Apollo Thymbraios; however, the romance between Troilus and Chryseis described in Geoffrey Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde and in William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida is a medieval invention.
Her role as a status symbol is at the heart of the dispute between Achilles and Agamemnon that initiates the plot of Homer's epic.

Zeus

JupiterCronidesZeus Chrysaoreus
Zeus and Poseidon had been rivals for the hand of Thetis until Prometheus, the fore-thinker, warned Zeus of a prophecy (originally uttered by Themis, goddess of divine law) that Thetis would bear a son greater than his father.

Chiron

Cheiron2060 ChironC
Peleus entrusted Achilles to Chiron the Centaur, on Mount Pelion, to be reared.
The Education of Achilles wall painting, from the basilica in Herculaneum (top right), is one of the most common Roman depictions of Chiron, as he teaches Achilles the lyre.

Troilus

Troilosa Trojan prince
According to the Cypria (the part of the Epic Cycle that tells the events of the Trojan War before Achilles' wrath), when the Achaeans desired to return home, they were restrained by Achilles, who afterwards attacked the cattle of Aeneas, sacked neighbouring cities (like Pedasus and Lyrnessus, where the Greeks capture the queen Briseis) and killed Tenes, a son of Apollo, as well as Priam's son Troilus in the sanctuary of Apollo Thymbraios; however, the romance between Troilus and Chryseis described in Geoffrey Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde and in William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida is a medieval invention.
Prophecies link Troilus' fate to that of Troy and so he is ambushed and murdered by Achilles.

Phoenix (son of Amyntor)

PhoenixPhoinix
He appointed five leaders (each leader commanding 500 Myrmidons): Menesthius, Eudorus, Peisander, Phoenix and Alcimedon.
Phoenix fled to Peleus, the king of Phthia, and Achilles' father, where Peleus made Phoenix a king of the Dolopians, and gave him the young Achilles to raise.

Styx

River StyxStygianStigian
Later legends (beginning with Statius' unfinished epic Achilleid, written in the 1st century AD) state that Achilles was invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel because, when his mother Thetis dipped him in the river Styx as an infant, she held him by one of his heels.
According to one tradition, Achilles was dipped in the waters of the river by his mother during his childhood, acquiring invulnerability, with exception of his heel, by which his mother held him.